Boarding Institution – World Socialist CWI http://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ Sun, 17 Oct 2021 21:37:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4-150x150.png Boarding Institution – World Socialist CWI http://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ 32 32 Boko Haram and the migration crisis in Nigeria | The Guardian Nigeria News https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/boko-haram-and-the-migration-crisis-in-nigeria-the-guardian-nigeria-news/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/boko-haram-and-the-migration-crisis-in-nigeria-the-guardian-nigeria-news/#respond Sun, 17 Oct 2021 03:37:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/boko-haram-and-the-migration-crisis-in-nigeria-the-guardian-nigeria-news/ On April 15, 2014, I sat in my living room in Lagos State, Nigeria at around 10 p.m. and watched with great attention the latest news regarding the kidnapping of schoolgirls (aged 16 to 18 years old) in a boarding school in Chibok, Borno State by the Boko Haram sect. While surprised by the news, […]]]>

On April 15, 2014, I sat in my living room in Lagos State, Nigeria at around 10 p.m. and watched with great attention the latest news regarding the kidnapping of schoolgirls (aged 16 to 18 years old) in a boarding school in Chibok, Borno State by the Boko Haram sect. While surprised by the news, I took to Twitter to see people’s opinions on the kidnapping, and to my surprise, Twitter was literally on fire. It was said that prior to the kidnapping, the school had been closed for four weeks due to deteriorating security conditions in the state, but students had to return to school to take their final exam of physical.

This opinion is a wake-up call for the Nigerian government: to ensure the safety of its citizens, in particular schoolgirls, against attacks, to reintegrate the displaced people into their communities of origin and to offer them good living conditions. As a Nigerian mother with my own children, the safety of the Nigerian schoolgirl worries me.

In present-day northern Nigeria, the schoolgirl appears to run the risk of being afraid of school or of being kidnapped and used as bait for ransom every time she goes to school. It must stop! I believe in the saying that “when you educate a girl, you educate a nation”.

Before answering questions surrounding the news, I would like to explain Boko Haram as a movement. Boko Haram means “Western education is prohibited”. It is a terrorist group based in northeastern Nigeria, Chad, the Republic of Niger and northern Cameroon. In February 2018, a part of Boko Haram called the Islamic State, West African Province (ISWAP) kidnapped more than 100 students in Dapchi, Yobe state – Leah Sharibu is the only girl left behind held hostage for refusing to renounce his religion, Christianity. .

Recently, in February 2021, 279 schoolgirls were kidnapped in Jangebe, Zamfara state. Schools have been easy targets for this sect. It appears that the leaders of the Boko Haram sect are standing by their movement to perpetuate acts of violence against schoolchildren, thus dissuading young children from accessing a good education. The question that comes to my mind as a Nigerian is, what steps has the government taken to avoid them? This clearly shows the incompetence of the government. A government (not linked to the ruling government but to the Nigerian government as an institution) that cannot avoid such an event certainly cannot be taken seriously.

According to the United Nations relief agency, the Boko Haram insurgency has killed 324,000 children and displaced an estimated 2.1 million people. With these numbers it is evident that migration – caused by the quest for a safe school, fear of being kidnapped, hunger, unemployment and the search for a better life – thrives well in crisis-prone areas. . Affected families have had to flee their homes to the internally displaced persons (IDP) camps that have been set up by the government.

The crisis has also led to international migration, as families have sought asylum in other countries. Most of the interventions that residents of northeastern Nigeria have received so far have come from international NGOs. International organizations like UNDP and UNHCR- https://www.unhcr.org/news/briefing/2019 have been proactive in providing solutions for the resettlement of these internally displaced people, but the Nigerian government has not done as much in the implementation of these plans and policies.

There are questions for the Nigerian government: How long will these internally displaced people continue to stay in camps with little or no hope for their future? When will they be fully integrated into the society to which they originally belong? Will the Nigerian government continue to put all its responsibilities on international organizations?

In my opinion, I think there are two sides to this. It seems that the fight against Boko Haram is overwhelming the government or that the government is being nonchalant in exercising its responsibilities to citizens.
Eduviere is a doctoral student and teaching assistant in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Iowa.


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Jackie Chan’s parents may have abandoned him after he was born because of their unusual job https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/jackie-chans-parents-may-have-abandoned-him-after-he-was-born-because-of-their-unusual-job/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/jackie-chans-parents-may-have-abandoned-him-after-he-was-born-because-of-their-unusual-job/#respond Sat, 16 Oct 2021 16:40:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/jackie-chans-parents-may-have-abandoned-him-after-he-was-born-because-of-their-unusual-job/ Movie star Jackie Chan is a renowned global actor who has dominated Hollywood with his films for decades. Unfortunately, his education was more painful than anything else. Jackie Chan’s parents abandoned him when he was just a child. The Guardian reported in April 2003 a film titled “Traces of the Dragon: Jackie Chan and His […]]]>

Movie star Jackie Chan is a renowned global actor who has dominated Hollywood with his films for decades. Unfortunately, his education was more painful than anything else.

Jackie Chan’s parents abandoned him when he was just a child. The Guardian reported in April 2003 a film titled “Traces of the Dragon: Jackie Chan and His Lost Family” which revealed the deepest and darkest secrets of his family which he was not aware of until later in his life. life.

The film was directed by Hong Kong director Mabel Cheung. The documentary revealed that when Jackie’s parents fled China for Hong Kong after the Communists came to power in 1949, they left their offspring behind.

Her father, Charles Chan, had two sons and her mother, Lee-Lee Chan, had two daughters. No one knew whether or not the couple had been alive for years. Cheung explained that the couple fled for survival, saying the idea was common in China at the time. She said:

“It’s a common thing to do, abandon your children. In every family there were abandoned children.

As he rose to fame around the world, rumors circulated in Jackie’s home country for years that he was living under a false name and had been adopted.

In turn, no one knew the star had two brothers, Shide and Shishen, who are still alive and living anonymous lives in China.

They also didn’t know that her mother was once a gamer in the Shanghai underworld, or that her father had been a nationalist spy and gang leader.

Cheung found the revelations astounding and said that the fact that Lee-Lee was an opium smuggler, gambler and big sister to the underworld was shocking to many, including his son Jackie, 67.

She explained why it came as a shock to everyone in Hong Kong, saying it was because she was known as an ordinary, kind and gentle housewife.

Jackie was reunited with his parents permanently in the Land Down Under when he was a teenager.

As for his father, Charles, Cheung described him as a dignified and very energetic man. He liked to drink whiskey daily and smoke a pipe.

Cheung added that when she interviewed him he appeared to be a funny and straightforward man. During an interview, when she asked him about the past, that was when her son first learned the truth about his brothers, whom he did not know existed.

This is also how the martial artist discovered how his parents met. His father had previously arrested his mother for smuggling opium.

Seeing that she had two daughters to care for, she resorted to gambling and racketeering. In addition, his father, whom he knew as Chan Chi-Long, was instead Fang Daolang.

Although Charles agreed to speak about his family history for a doccie, he seemed somewhat reserved when the filmmakers delved into his past life. Moreover, he was reluctant to speak of his wife as an opium trafficker.

In September 2017, Jackie revealed in an interview that her father was a spy in hiding at the U.S. Embassy in Canberra, Australia. At the time, he was promoting his animated film “The Lego Ninjago Movie”.

He explained his connection to Canberra, sharing that his father was in hiding because he was a Chinese nationalist agent who fled home to avoid being captured by rival Communists.

Jackie spent most of her childhood away from her parents while they resided in Canberra. He grew up in a boarding school in Hong Kong.

Jackie was reunited with his parents permanently in the Land Down Under when he was a teenager. The couple moved to Canberra in the early 1970s, where Charles found a job as a chef at the U.S. Embassy.

Sadly, his wife passed away in February 2002, and almost six years later he also passed away in February 2008 at the age of 93. He had a long battle with prostate cancer.

His son brought his body back to Canberra, where he deposited it next to his wife. Speaking of his passing, Jackie said he loved his father very much because he had done so much for him when he was young.

He told reporters they came from a low-income family, and his father raised and left his homeland to support himself, adding that he was the best for him.

That same month, he paid tribute to his late parents in Australia by funding a new science education center at the country’s largest cancer research institution.

He and Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd opened the Jackie Chan Science Center at Australian National University to honor them. He thanked the country for taking care of his parents for 46 years.

Previously, the father of two had disclosed that he would not have been known as “Jackie” today without having lived in Australia. The actor said he was initially referred to as “Steve” when he attended Dickson College in the Australian Capital Territory.

Courtesy of a friend at the US Embassy, ​​his name was “Jack” at the time. When he went to look for a job, a guy asked him what his English name was, and he replied that he didn’t have one.

Her boyfriend was a driver for the embassy, ​​and his name was Jack, so the guy agreed to call him Jack. The Academy Honorary Award winner then revealed that he added an “ie” to his name to give him more momentum when he returned home to Hong Kong to pursue an acting career.

Jackie began studying martial arts, drama, acrobatics and singing at the age of seven. He studied at the Chinese Opera Research Institute.

Once considered a successor to Bruce Lee, the director developed his martial arts style and merged it with some wacky physical comedy.

Jackie made her film debut at the age of eight in “Big and Little Wong Tin Bar” in 1962. Her big movie hiatus came after the release of the classic movie “Drunken Master”.


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Why Roedean is a school worth saving https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/why-roedean-is-a-school-worth-saving/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/why-roedean-is-a-school-worth-saving/#respond Fri, 15 Oct 2021 14:24:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/why-roedean-is-a-school-worth-saving/ At Roedean, I shared rooms, courses, meals, and trips (legal and illegal) to Brighton with Russian, Chinese, African, Thai and Canadian girlfriends. I can’t imagine a more multicultural life experience and I haven’t experienced anything like it since. In my second year, two new girls arrived – an Israeli and a Palestinian. The rooms were […]]]>

At Roedean, I shared rooms, courses, meals, and trips (legal and illegal) to Brighton with Russian, Chinese, African, Thai and Canadian girlfriends. I can’t imagine a more multicultural life experience and I haven’t experienced anything like it since.

In my second year, two new girls arrived – an Israeli and a Palestinian. The rooms were assigned in alphabetical order and because their last names started with R they were placed in the same dormitory. I remember the first day they heard a big argument, one of them yelling at the hostess that they couldn’t share because they would kill each other. I also heard his calm response, only slightly frightening. “This,” she said, “is the way we do things here. There will be no room change, there will be no rowing, and there will certainly be no murder – except by me. In less than two weeks they were best friends and the last time I heard they were sharing a flat in London.

I am more than grateful for my time at Roedean. It gave me confidence, independence, strength in my own beliefs, the ability to get along with just about anyone, and the most fantastic education. I would find it sad beyond measure if this iconic institution, with its 135 years of significant feminist history and ethics, did not survive.

Sara Lawrence is the author of Jinx slater book series


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4 inspiring schools in the United States, 4 paths to university success https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/4-inspiring-schools-in-the-united-states-4-paths-to-university-success/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/4-inspiring-schools-in-the-united-states-4-paths-to-university-success/#respond Thu, 14 Oct 2021 08:39:27 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/4-inspiring-schools-in-the-united-states-4-paths-to-university-success/ International families can’t go wrong with an American education. Schools in the United States are known to stand out for their academic excellence, their focus on individual student learning, and their dedication to personal development. More importantly, each has a strong record of successful admissions to top colleges and universities. By training students to become […]]]>

International families can’t go wrong with an American education. Schools in the United States are known to stand out for their academic excellence, their focus on individual student learning, and their dedication to personal development. More importantly, each has a strong record of successful admissions to top colleges and universities.

By training students to become future athletes, artists, collaborators and leaders, they produce graduates who stand out in the pools of competitive candidates. Schools that offer boarding schools provide 24/7 exposure to this excellence. Residents of American schools often live and learn alongside a variety of peers who teach them the importance of appreciating and respecting different perspectives – another benefit that attracts the attention of admissions officers.

While the officers are impressed, the students are confident. In fact, studies show that 78% of residential school students feel prepared for college against only 28% of students in public schools. Half of these students obtain higher degrees, compared to 21% of public school students.

Now that we’ve highlighted the “why,” let’s move on to the “where,” here are four days and boarding schools in the United States known to offer the above and more:

Emblematic school

At Landmark School, every student has a curriculum they call their own. Source: Landmark School

Families looking for a highly effective and individualized educational approach will find everything they need at Landmark School. Located just 30 miles north of Boston – one of the fastest growing cities in the United States – this coeducational day school and boarding school specializes in the education and empowerment of learners diagnosed with dyslexia or another language-based learning disability (LBLD) for academic and social success.

How? ‘Or’ What? With personalized programs, one-on-one daily tutorial (orientation), classes of six to eight students, highly qualified teachers, robust extracurricular activities, community service and much more. Landmark is a leader in serving dyslexic students in the United States and internationally. Learn more about Landmark’s unique and proven approach.

Each student’s curriculum is tailored to their specific learning needs. It fosters respect, trust and a sense of trust to turn every obstacle into an opportunity.

“At Landmark, I am with students who also suffer from dyslexia, and my teachers fully understand me and understand how to teach me,” says Sunaina “Su” Hoon, an international student from New Delhi, India. “They encourage me to ask questions and ask for help. It’s really heartwarming to know that the people in class with me are having the same difficulties as me.

Su is a college preparatory student at Landmark School, which is as rigorous as it is holistic.

Landmark School offers three academic programs: the Expressive Language Program, the Founders Program, and the Preparation Program – each helps students develop their language skills and study for success in college, university and beyond. .

Every highly sought after program results in what graduates and their families call the Landmark Advantage.

Once students’ educational needs are met and they gain the social and emotional well-being they have always needed, they realize their potential and thrive. Ninety-four percent pursue their vocation in college or university. All of them get acceptance.

Take a virtual tour, hear from current students, and meet the admissions team.

The avant-garde school

Source: The avant-garde school

Vanguard School offers independent, coeducational, boarding and daytime education for grades 6-12. Source: The Vanguard School

The avant-garde school certainly does not lack zeal and pedagogical talent to achieve its mission: to help guide students in the development of their character and academic potential through academically rigorous and content-rich educational programs. This is where individualized, focused and study-oriented education meets a safe, supportive and compassionate community.

Here, learning is tailored to the needs of each student. Students are tested upon admissions, upon entering each school year, and collectively during the last term of school in April. Currently, the school has students with IQ levels of 70 to 140.

“By emphasizing individualized attention in the context of a small classroom, Vanguard ensures the academic, social and personal growth of each student,” says school principal Shannon Graves.

Vanguard School offers independent, coeducational, boarding and daytime education for grades 6 to 12. Each student receives an individualized program, bolstered by an 8: 1 student-teacher ratio, small class sizes, and technology to keep them engaged.

The 77-acre campus is home to 120 students and supports outdoor activities year-round. Here, teamwork, sportsmanship and character are nurtured. Students can choose from a range of sports including soccer, basketball, tennis, archery, swimming, golf and more.

New Hampton School

Source: New Hampton School

New Hampton School’s signature approach to education is an extension of the school’s mission and goals. Source: New Hampton School

Put on 340 magnificent hectares in the village of New Hampton, New Hampshire, 325 students work for a future that is not only successful, but fulfilling. Well-equipped, the New Hampton School is a co-ed college preparatory institution that hosts 12 residential houses, state-of-the-art classrooms and science labs, computer labs, research center, library, studios for every art, athletics complex and endless mountain area for outdoor exploration. The aim is to train lifelong learners who want to become active citizens of the world.

New Hampton School’s signature approach to education is an extension of the school’s mission and goals. The fully customizable Foundations of Learning Program shapes dynamic students by providing the rigor and support each student needs with International Baccalaureate, advanced placement and academic support offerings.

When it comes to nurturing interests and passions, the school ensures that every child has the opportunity to immerse themselves. Interschool teams include downhill skiing, baseball, cross-country skiing, equestrian sports, field hockey and more.

For creatives, there is several courses available in visual, digital and performing arts including comedic improvisation, environmental art, animation, graphic design, and photography – to name a few. The result? New Hampton’s senior class, made up of over 100 people, enjoys an impressive success rate, enroll in over 85 different colleges and universities.

Greenwood School

Source: Greenwood School

For decades, students from all over the world have chosen Greenwood School to study in a family, supportive and supportive atmosphere. Source: Greenwood School

Founded in 1978 in rural Putney, Vermont, Greenwood School is a small preparatory boarding school and day school for boys between the classes of 6 and 12. For decades, students from all over the world, including Spain and Singapore, have chosen to come here for a family, understanding and supportive atmosphere.

These are the traits needed to nurture talents who have struggled in traditional environments due to language-based learning differences such as dyslexia, executive function issues, ADD or ADHD, weaknesses in expression written, dysgraphia or mathematical difficulties such as dyscalculia.

The study program here is structured enough to ensure students with these differences develop the self-discipline and confidence they need to excel in independent studies. Main themes include: English, Arts, Math, History, Science, STEAM, Creations, and Language Literacy.

Outside of the classroom, students can be found socializing with their peers or faculty members; or embark on various excursions that contribute to their personal development. They play with puppies, cycle, kayak, train their bodies in the gym, explore in the STEAM lab, paint on canvases in the art studio, practice their favorite instruments in the music studio, and more. . These activities were put in place to ensure that young boys grow up to be talented young men.

* Some of the institutions featured in this article are Business Partners of Study International


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National speaker explains how historical trauma haunts Native American communities – the Durango Herald https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/national-speaker-explains-how-historical-trauma-haunts-native-american-communities-the-durango-herald/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/national-speaker-explains-how-historical-trauma-haunts-native-american-communities-the-durango-herald/#respond Wed, 13 Oct 2021 03:34:05 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/national-speaker-explains-how-historical-trauma-haunts-native-american-communities-the-durango-herald/ Recognizing past events and lingering impacts helps the healing process Saleena Boyington, left, a social worker in social services, and Elena Giacci, an advocate for indigenous communities and victims of sexual and domestic violence, share a moment outside the Southern Ute multi-use facility in Ignacio. Both said discussions of historical trauma can help Native American […]]]>

Recognizing past events and lingering impacts helps the healing process

Saleena Boyington, left, a social worker in social services, and Elena Giacci, an advocate for indigenous communities and victims of sexual and domestic violence, share a moment outside the Southern Ute multi-use facility in Ignacio. Both said discussions of historical trauma can help Native American and Indigenous communities heal. (Shannon Mullane / Special for the Herald)

Editor’s Note: This article contains descriptions of violence and abuse that may be sensitive to some readers.

IGNACIO – In a room in the Southern Ute Reservation, nearly 65 people were ordered to take a rubber band, bite one end, stretch it away from their mouths, and hold it.

The group was participating in training on historical and current trauma among Native American and Indigenous communities, held Monday on the occasion of Indigenous Peoples Day. National speaker Elena Giacci was demonstrating a tactic used against Native American children in residential schools to teach English and punish Native language.

At the front of the room, Giacci stretched a rubber band to his demonstration assistant, the 6th district attorney, Christian Champagne.

She asked him to say “Hello, how are you?” in the Lakota language. Since he could not, she stopped the demonstration. The boarding school teachers weren’t that nice.

“It was told to me by a grandfather. He said it would happen three to 30 times a day, ”Giacci said, adding that other elders had told him similar stories. “He said, ‘Elena, when I speak my own language, my lips hurt.’ And he was out of residential school then, probably about 65 years old.

Grieving and counseling services are available through community resources such as the Grief Center of Southwest Colorado, Axis Health System, and Colorado Crisis Services at (844) 493-8255.

Giacci shared this memory as part of a presentation on historical events, the traumas they caused and the lasting impacts they have today. Acknowledging the pain of the past is a step in the healing process, said Giacci, a Diné trainer and advocate specializing in antisexual and domestic violence and advocacy for Native American and Indigenous communities.

The two-day training was attended by a mix of Native American and non-Native community members, therapists, lawyers, teachers, health providers and more.

It was organized by Champagne and the 6th Judicial District Attorney’s Office, the Mercy Regional Medical Center, and the Colorado Coalition Against Sexual Assault.

The first day focused on the links between traumas experienced by past generations and lasting impacts. Giacci presented decades of harmful policies and practices against Native Americans, as well as discussions of prejudice, the importance of apologies, healing, and advice for non-natives who wish to help.

“It’s like there is one thing after another after another,” she said during the presentation. “But you have to understand this story to understand our rage.”

Historic trauma and now

Giacci began its historic outline in 1500 – but its impacts, she said, extend until 2021.

At that time, historians estimate that there were approximately 60 million Native Americans in North America. In 1900, the population fell to 1 million, Giacci said.

“Just imagine how your life would change if you were the only person surviving in your entire state,” she said.

At the end of the 15th century, the Doctrine of Discovery was published by the Catholic Church. It worked its way into established American law to justify “manifest destiny,” the takeover of Native American lands, the punishment of non-Christians, and ultimately the establishment of residential schools.

The Sand Creek Massacre was described as murder and barbarism in an 1864 Joint Committee on Warfare report, Giacci said. But still to get to the scene of the massacre, people pass by the town of Chivington, which is named after the colonel who led the attack on non-combatant women, children and the elderly.

The historical trauma and sexual violence training held Monday and Tuesday in Ignacio by national speaker Elena Giacci aimed to give attendees a better understanding of past events that influence the Native American experience to date. (Shannon Mullane / Special for the Herald)

She spoke about the forced sterilization of Indigenous women in the 1970s and transracial adoption practices, when an Indigenous mother learned her baby was stillborn as adoption agencies delivered the healthy baby to a non-native family.

People aged 43 and over lived in a time when Native Americans could not freely practice their traditional religions before the American Indian Religious Freedom Act of 1978, she said.

“You can practice your religion without fear of punishment. Not our community, ”she said.

She described Ronald McDonald wearing a headdress, which has symbolic and ceremonial significance, in an advertisement. She compared it to the way religions are portrayed in the ad, asking if it was a priest’s necklace, how long would it last?

She joked about her love for cheese available on reserve, one of the many low-nutrient staple foods provided by the federal government.

If anyone sees higher levels of diabetes among Native Americans, “stop and look at what’s going on on the reservation,” Giacci said.

Then, during the residential school days of the 19th and 20th centuries, children were removed from their homes, forced to abandon their indigenous traditions and adopt non-indigenous practices as part of a national policy of forced assimilation. .

Residential school records showed incidents of beatings, poisoning, electric shock, starvation, radiation exposure and pedophile rings, Giacci said.

The history of these schools, like the “Old Fort” belonging to Fort Lewis College, was further amplified this summer when anonymous student graves were discovered at old school sites in Canada and the United States, according to national reports.

Saleena Boyington, a member of the Diné tribe who works as a counselor and social worker, recalled that she was 7 or 8 years old when it was her turn to go to residential school.

“You have the love of your parents, and all of a sudden you’re just ripped off. Then you are placed in an institution and you don’t even understand why, ”she said. “So you are called wild or slow and retarded. … You learn to be, in a sense, stoic. I see that with a lot of American Indians. They’re like, I’m fine. But in reality, they are not.

Christianity imposed itself on her at school and still occupies an important place in her life. He was told not to share his birth name, which means the warrior who turned around. We gave her a number: 13, she said.

“To this day, that’s all I know,” Boyington said. “I don’t know anything about my culture and my traditions. I struggled with it.

It’s confusing, she said.

“I don’t know who I am,” Boyington said.

These historic policies are linked to a continued mistrust of medical institutions and organized religion, and health issues, such as diabetes, drug addiction, suicidal tendencies and depression, Giacci said.

Sometimes in medical circles, Boyington has said she seemed angry or unapproachable. But internally, she faces memories of nurses at the boarding school, she said.

Younger generations remember grandparents who used corporal punishment in the home or the impacts of destroyed family systems.

“When you see corporal punishment, where do you think it comes from? Giacci asked during training.

Righting the wrongs

Inside the Southern Ute Multi-Purpose Facility, the atmosphere was often heavy, punctuated by moments of Giacci humor.

As the discussion evolved into the healing process, she shared a clip from The Stylehorse Collective with a message of resilience from Native American artists. The group listened to Kevin Gover’s “Never Again,” formal apology to Native Americans as head of the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

Giacci gave advice to non-natives who wanted to help the healing process. They could request the removal of stereotypical images, such as the “chef” panel at the Toh-Atin Gallery in Durango.

Doctors could make it clear to patients that after the procedures they will still be able to have children, Giacci said.

“One of the main lessons I have is that we need to do a better job in the criminal justice system by working with people of color, especially our Native American community, to help them believe that we are there for them. serve, ”said Champagne. “Being here to serve them with honesty, loyalty and integrity is the best way to do that.”

He saw a deep distrust of the justice system reflected during the training.

“We need to do a better job of bringing them into the fold and helping them understand that we are also working for them,” he said.

The seminar was a reminder of how present these problems are, said Cristen Alexandria, multicultural advocate for Alternatives Horizons.

“And remember all the work we need to do to continue the conversation and deepen our understanding of historical trauma and trauma, especially within our Indigenous community,” said Alexandria. “We have a lot of listening to do.”

Some participants came to connect with others with similar experiences; others to acquire cultural tools and skills.

“This event was difficult. It was really hard to hear about some of those traumas, ”said Mandi McKinley, COO and former lawyer for Alternative Horizons. “I came away feeling that there is a lot of room for people who are not Indigenous to become allies and play a role that can help. “

“It’s a really big eye-opener for me,” said Anna Spencer, forensic nurse at Mercy Regional Medical Center. “The historical trauma has repercussions. So how can we solve this problem? “

For Boyington, her goal was to help other Native Americans in her capacity as a social worker.

“All of this information that I’m getting here, I’m using it in some way to educate a lot of Native Americans on why we behave and do the things we do,” Boyington said.

In the future, she hopes more Native Americans can find healing by dealing with both historical and current trauma.

“We’re not just stuck on a reservation. We can be more than that, ”she said. “For non-natives, when it comes to their education, there is a reason why Native Americans are the way they are and why they behave that way. “


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Lack of internet access delays school digital literacy project https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/lack-of-internet-access-delays-school-digital-literacy-project/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/lack-of-internet-access-delays-school-digital-literacy-project/#respond Sun, 10 Oct 2021 08:12:38 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/lack-of-internet-access-delays-school-digital-literacy-project/ The principal of the primary school Flouspar Amos Orina inside the old computer lab on September 29, 2021 [Joseph Kipsang, Standard] When the government introduced the digital literacy program in primary schools in 2016, the Fluorspar Primary School in Elgeyo Marakwet County was among the pilot institutions. However, just five years later, the once esteemed […]]]>

The principal of the primary school Flouspar Amos Orina inside the old computer lab on September 29, 2021 [Joseph Kipsang, Standard]

When the government introduced the digital literacy program in primary schools in 2016, the Fluorspar Primary School in Elgeyo Marakwet County was among the pilot institutions.

However, just five years later, the once esteemed institution is a shell of itself.

School equipment is dilapidated, the ceiling panels in most classrooms are collapsing, and the computer lab has been closed indefinitely due to lack of internet connectivity.

According to Amos Orina, the principal of the school, the problems started when the Kenya Fluorspar Company, located just two kilometers away, ceased operations in April 2016 and then withdrew its sponsorship for the school.

At its peak, the mining company injected millions of shillings into the development of the primary day school and boarding school, which was one of its successful corporate social responsibility projects.

Even after ceasing mining activities in 2016, the company continued to support the school for the next two years.

However, in 2018 he officially withdrew his sponsorship and the school was transferred to the Ministry of Petroleum and Mines as a private institution.

Orina said the school’s population has grown from 270 students in 2019 to 215 this year, following the financial difficulties she is facing.

“But the saddest thing is that not all of our teachers and support staff have received a salary since 2019 due to the confusion,” he said.

“Our ICT systems are down and digital learning has collapsed due to lack of maintenance. We have no money for maintenance.

According to the school administration, the digital equipment has not been used since 2019 because the school has not paid the electricity bills. Deputy principal Lydia Kipyego said teachers were struggling.

“Things are bad. We have a huge electricity bill and teachers depend on parents for everything, including food. We hope that a solution will be found soon, ”she said.

The president of the school’s parents’ association, Hosea Toroitich, said the school was abandoned following a delay in changing its registration status from a private school under the Ministry of Mines at a public educational institution under the authority of the Ministry of Education.

“The school was abandoned. We ask the Ministry of Mines to come back and save our institution from collapse, ”Toroitch said.

He said parents made several attempts to seek help from the Ministry of Mines, but were told the school was under the Ministry of Education. Toroitich said parents paid teachers Sh5,000 each month for upkeep.

“We have 35 workers, including teachers, who were handed over to the Ministry of Mines during the transition. They are now demoralized because they depend on the parents’ meager monthly tokens, ”he said.

Elgeyo Marakwet County Education Director Kituyi Masibo said the process of converting the school to a public institution has started, but is not yet complete.

“Fluorspar Primary School is a private institution and there is not much we can do at this point. I sent a team to assess the situation and make a report, ”Masibo said.



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Atonement for sins against Indigenous peoples begins by facing the past. India’s Red Cloud School is leading the way. https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/atonement-for-sins-against-indigenous-peoples-begins-by-facing-the-past-indias-red-cloud-school-is-leading-the-way/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/atonement-for-sins-against-indigenous-peoples-begins-by-facing-the-past-indias-red-cloud-school-is-leading-the-way/#respond Fri, 08 Oct 2021 16:59:57 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/atonement-for-sins-against-indigenous-peoples-begins-by-facing-the-past-indias-red-cloud-school-is-leading-the-way/ When the Holy Rosary Mission was founded on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota in 1888, many Jesuits and Franciscan Sisters who created the mission learned the Lakota language. The missionaries believed that this method of inculturation would be effective pastorally. Community of the Sisters of Saint Francis of Penance and Christian Charity, […]]]>

When the Holy Rosary Mission was founded on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota in 1888, many Jesuits and Franciscan Sisters who created the mission learned the Lakota language. The missionaries believed that this method of inculturation would be effective pastorally.

Community of the Sisters of Saint Francis of Penance and Christian Charity, nd, 1890-1920, Saint François, S. Dak. Photo provided.

Ironically, at the residential school they founded at Holy Rosary Mission, they banned native Lakota speakers from speaking their own language, in accordance with federal government policy at the time. In doing so, the men and women religious have become complicit in the destruction of the Lakota culture.

We, a former Lakota Catholic student in Red Cloud and a White Jesuit in training, are working directly on the Red Cloud Indian School Truth and Healing initiative to address this story.

A traumatic story

The founding of the Holy Rosary Mission was part of a much larger settlement project ultimately devised by the United States government. Over 300 boarding schools have been funded by the government and often run by various Christian denominations. Like the Holy Rosary Mission Residential School (renamed Red Cloud Indian School in 1969), these schools were places where aspects of Indigenous culture were intrusive and forbidden. The government’s vision for residential schools was explained by one of their architects, General Richard Henry Pratt of the Carlisle Indian Industrial School in Pennsylvania, as a method of assimilation: “Kill the Indian, save the man.” .

To ensure the effectiveness of this assimilation, boarding schools rely on the removal of children from their families. As the church today preaches the sanctity of family life and the need to pass on values ​​and faith in the family, in the 19th and 20th centuries in North America, the church participated in the process that has systematically broken indigenous families.

A survivor of the Holy Rosary Mission described family separation as “damaging” to the bond between parents and their children. “This is probably the most important thing they took away from us…. You lose that part of your culture…. I think you spend the rest of your life not knowing who you are.

Jesuit and Lakota students pose for a photo outside the Holy Rosary Mission.
Jesuit and Lakota students pose for a photo outside the Holy Rosary Mission., Nd, 1890-1900. Photo provided.

Long hair was cut, given names changed, and traditional clothing was banned in most of these schools, including Holy Rosary Mission. “I found that very ironic,” said one mission survivor of his haircut. “[They] told me one thing, then they showed us Christ on the cross who had long hair.

“We regret our participation in the separation of families and the removal of indigenous sacred languages, cultures and ways of life,” the Jesuit Conference of Canada and the United States said in a statement last month. “While these practices and our participation in such schools ended decades ago, their traumatic effects have continued to reverberate through generations and are still very much present in many today.”

“The basic structures and practices of these schools required indigenous children to be separated from their families and prohibited these children from speaking their language and practicing their culture. “

“We regret our participation in the separation of families and the removal of indigenous sacred languages, cultures and ways of life,” said the Jesuit Conference of Canada and the United States.

Indigenous Peoples Day and Orange Shirt Day

Many Indigenous peoples recognize the history of Indigenous cultures two days each fall. In addition to Indigenous Peoples Day, which is celebrated this year on October 11 in the United States, several in Canada and the United States begin to commemorate the historical trauma suffered by Indigenous peoples as a result of colonization each September 30. , on the occasion of what is now known as Orange Shirt Day. Orange Shirt Day is named after Phyllis Webstad, a survivor of St. Joseph’s Residential School in Williams Lake, B.C., who remembers wearing an orange shirt her grandmother bought her on her first day school.

“When I arrived at the Mission, they undressed me and took off my clothes, including the orange shirt! Recalled Ms. Webstad of the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation. “I never wore it again,” she added. “The color orange always reminded me of that and how much my feelings didn’t matter, how nobody cared and how I felt like I was worthless.”

In addition to Indigenous Peoples Day on October 11, many Canadians and the United States begin to commemorate Orange Shirt Day every September 30.

The tensions we experience today in Red Cloud stem directly from its foundations as part of a similar colonial project. The Jesuits came to Pine Ridge at the invitation of Chief Red Cloud, but the deleterious impacts of their assimilation efforts, carried out in conjunction with the United States government, are undeniably still being felt – one of the reasons Orange Shirt Day resonates with Indigenous peoples. from Red Cloud today.

As part of Orange Shirt Day commemorations this year, Red Cloud students created a memorial using early 19th century school desks that they collected from our store. They painted the desks orange and invited the community to write on them, as well as donate memorials of flowers, fruits and traditional medicines as a way to honor the more than 6,000 children who died in Native American residential schools across the city. ‘North America.

From the same desks, students were once forbidden to speak Lakota, our students wrote, in Lakota, words of remembrance and honor.

From the same desks, students were once forbidden to speak Lakota, our students wrote, in Lakota, words of remembrance and honor.

The mission today

Once an institution that systematically suppressed the Lakota language, Red Cloud Indian School is today a Lakota language immersion school. Lakota culture and sacred rites are also practiced and taught in our classrooms, and Indigenous artists and culture are supported by our Heritage Center.

Yet the changes that have taken place at Red Cloud over the years may seem hollow, as our tragic past has not been sufficiently recognized. That’s why we embarked on a process of truth and healing inspired by the research of Dr. Maria Yellow Horse Braveheart, a psychologist who has studied the effects of generational trauma and healing pathways. Dr Braveheart presents a four-pronged path to dealing with this trauma: confrontation, understanding, healing and transformation. We hope this process will help us recognize this damage and lead our community to collective healing.

At Red Cloud, we are now in the confrontation phase. This includes collecting survivor stories and facilitating frequent talking circles within our community to provide a space to unbox this story and its impact on our present. Some survivors carry stories of pain with them; others have fond memories and gratitude for their time at the Holy Rosary. Their stories will help create a complete picture of our history.

A former institution that systematically suppressed the Lakota language, Red Cloud Indian School is today a Lakota language immersion school.

The confrontation also signified the initiation of a community-wide process that will culminate in the use of ground penetrating radar (GPR) on our campus. It is already clear to us that in our historic cemetery, there are graves that have lost their bearings. This technology will help us determine the exact location of these graves and allow us to mark and commemorate them in a way that honors those buried there.

The confrontation also prompted questions from students and educators about our classrooms and our curriculum. What does it mean to teach American literature, for example, in an English department of a former boarding school where English was once a means of assimilating children into white culture?

Henry Westropp, SJ, visiting John Fool Head and his family, nd, 1890-1920, Slim Buttes, S. Dak.
Henry Westropp, SJ, visiting John Fool Head and his family, nd, 1890-1920, Slim Buttes, S. Dak. Photo provided.

An exploration of our Lakota-Catholic identity is also fundamental to the experience of confrontation. We are fully aware that some members of the Lakota community wish that Red Cloud was no longer a Catholic school. Yet there are Lakota who wish Red Cloud to claim an even more vibrant Catholic identity. We believe that an essential component of confronting this past is to confront these questions directly and at their deepest levels. No amount of balancing Lakota and Catholic spiritual practices by equal weight or mandate can solve the fundamental problem of discomfort or anger towards Catholicism.

The Red Cloud Indian School is the starting point for the much needed intercultural and interfaith dialogue that seeks to address the tragic history of the Native American boarding system.

Red Cloud Indian School is the ground zero, in many ways, for the much needed intercultural and interfaith dialogue that seeks to address the tragic history of the Native American boarding system. For Aboriginals, it is a family affair. We have grandparents who were in these boarding schools and can draw a straight line through the trauma experienced through the generations. For Jesuits and other white Catholics, our spiritual lineage and privileges are directly linked to this history of colonization.

We are all hurt by this story. All people are affected by intergenerational trauma and feel both oppressive and downtrodden.

Delving into this story probes both the mysteries of evil and of grace. We don’t yet know what a decolonized church looks like. We hope, however, that by engaging with the past and its legacy, we can move forward towards collective healing and discover new avenues of relationship between Indigenous peoples and the Catholic Church.


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Altitude Adjustment: 5 Things You Do At The Airport That Makes You A Hole https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/altitude-adjustment-5-things-you-do-at-the-airport-that-makes-you-a-hole/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/altitude-adjustment-5-things-you-do-at-the-airport-that-makes-you-a-hole/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 23:23:18 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/altitude-adjustment-5-things-you-do-at-the-airport-that-makes-you-a-hole/ Traveling can be stressful. When most people find themselves at an airport, they are either late or outright exhausted and ready to arrive at their final destination. But that doesn’t mean none of us should ignore proper airport etiquette. Being a thoughtful traveler is in everyone’s best interest, right? With that in mind, we’ve compiled […]]]>

Traveling can be stressful. When most people find themselves at an airport, they are either late or outright exhausted and ready to arrive at their final destination. But that doesn’t mean none of us should ignore proper airport etiquette.









Being a thoughtful traveler is in everyone’s best interest, right? With that in mind, we’ve compiled a short list of things not do while flying. (No, we’re not bitter. What makes you say that?)





When traveling, follow these simple rules of airport etiquette:





1. Don’t be a drag





While everyone is thrilled that you have joined the rest of us in the 21st century by acquiring a trolley bag, let’s make sure you know how to walk with it. Please do not drag your luggage two feet behind you; keep it close. In fact, think of it as a part of you – you should always be aware of where your bag is and how it could be.





2. What is that smell?





Hey you all in line [insert overpriced airport restaurant here], don’t even think about packing that hot meal and bringing it on the plane! While you surely deserve a hearty dinner, your fellow travelers don’t deserve to smell roast beef au jus or linguini in clam sauce until JFK.





3. Checkpoint yourself





Here is one that only applies to those who have traveled, say, more than once in his life: How not to know how airport security works ?! Take those shoes off before you get to the big radioactive machine and put this laptop in its own trash can!









4. Wait your GD turn!





I’m pretty sure it says on your ticket which group you will be boarding the plane with. Haven’t heard if Group C is ready to board? Ask another traveler. Everyone goes to the same place, so there’s no need to rush out the door and hamper those who are supposed to get on. Also unacceptable: congestion of the baggage carousel on landing.





5. Move your ass





Moving walks (you know, those flat escalators) have been a standard offering at airports for quite some time, although unfortunately some people still don’t know the protocol: if you have all the time in the world and you don’t rush. not to a flight, which means you are going to stand on the catwalk instead of trotting, move to the right. Let your traveling companions in a hurry walk past you to the left, and the airport will be a much friendlier and less stressful place.





Are there other rules of airport etiquette that we’ve left out?





Image presented by izusek via iStock










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Video safe – October 6, 2021 | Movie https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/video-safe-october-6-2021-movie/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/video-safe-october-6-2021-movie/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 14:38:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/video-safe-october-6-2021-movie/ CHOICE OF THE WEEK ALONE IN THE DARK (Scream Factory / Shout! Factory): Director / co-writer Jack Sholder’s feature debut in 1982 is among the most star-studded slasher films, with a spicy cast and a generous dose of dark comedy amid blood and guts . Dwight Schultz, shortly before joining Team A, plays Dan Potter, […]]]>

CHOICE OF THE WEEK






ALONE IN THE DARK (Scream Factory / Shout! Factory): Director / co-writer Jack Sholder’s feature debut in 1982 is among the most star-studded slasher films, with a spicy cast and a generous dose of dark comedy amid blood and guts .

Dwight Schultz, shortly before joining Team A, plays Dan Potter, the sweet-mannered, bespectacled new psychiatrist in an asylum run – rather indulgently – by dowry Leo Bain (the inimitable Donald Pleasence), a regular practitioner of medical marijuana before it was legal .

The true gallery of thugs Potter meets, played, with varying degrees of chewing glee, by future Oscar winners Jack Palance and Martin Landau, and the imposing Erland Van Lidth – as well as a fourth patient (nicknamed “The Bleeder” ) whose identity is not disclosed until much, much later.

A convenient power failure allows the inmates to escape, and they head for Dr. Potter’s house, having mistakenly thought he murdered his predecessor. In what can only be called “brutal irony,” the Potters must become more vicious and violent than their attackers to survive the night.

Alone in the dark, which has the distinction of being the first film produced by New Line Cinema (which hit paydirt with Freddy two years later), isn’t a horror classic, but it delivers operating goods and a fair amount of laughs along the way. Moreover, the film has absolutely no relation to the video game of the same name or its (appalling) film versions.

The “Collector’s Edition” Blu-ray (retail $ 34.98) features audio commentary, retrospective interviews and features, a theatrical trailer, and more. Classified R. ** ½

ALSO AVAILABLE

AWAKENING (Cohen Media Group / Kino Lorber): The award-winning, R-rated 2011 Cooler Blu-ray arc ($ 29.99 retail) from director / screenwriter Nick Murphy set in 1920s England, with Rebecca Hall in as an investigator delving into the dark past of a boarding school where a wave of ghost sightings allegedly caused the death of a young child, with Dominic West, Imelda Staunton, Diana Kent, Shaun Dooley and John Shrapnel (deceased in 2020) at hand. Bonus features include retrospective and vintage reports and interviews, deleted scenes, and more.

BLADES (Vinegar Syndrome): Mutilated bodies keep showing up at the Tall Grass Country Club, and a Possessed Lawnmower (!)?) Aired to an unsuspecting audience in 1989. A horror parody too long but sometimes inspired that passes the time quite easily, available in a limited edition Blu-ray ($ 39.98 retail) featuring audio commentary, retrospective documentary, and more. To classify. **

SPIRIT DESIRE (IFC Films / IFC Midnight / Shout! Factory): Director Edward Hall’s feature debut is the latest incarnation of Noel Coward’s classic farce, in which struggling writer Dan Stevens and his new wife Isla Fisher are haunted by the spirit of his first wife (Leslie Mann) after a botched shoot led by an eccentric medium (stage thief Judi Dench). The cast goes to great lengths – perhaps too much – but despite a few fun scenes, it pales in comparison to the final 1945 version. The DVD ($ 19.98 retail) and Blu-ray ($ 22.98 retail) include behind-the-scenes functionality, rated PG-13. **

THE CANNIBAL MAN (Severin Films / MVD Entertainment Group): Director / screenwriter Eloy de la Iglesia’s Macabre Shock of 1982 (originally titled The semana del asesino) stars Vicente Parra as an increasingly deranged slaughterhouse worker who sets out on a killing spree but finds getting rid of his victims a hindrance – at least at first. There isn’t much else to say, although it has its devotees. Bonus features include original audio options in Spanish (with English subtitles) and English, retrospective interviews, and more. Classified R. * ½

THE CONJURING: THE DEVIL MADE ME DO (Warner Bros. Home Entertainment): Vera Farmiga and Patrick Wilson reprise their roles as real-life paranormal investigators Lorraine and Ed Warren in the latest R-rated installment of the popular – and highly profitable horror franchise, based on a true 1981 case in which the defendant (Ruairi O’Connor) pleaded not guilty due to demonic possession, available on DVD ($ 29.98 retail), Blu-ray ($ 34.98 retail) and 4K Ultra HD combo (44 , $ 98 retail), each loaded with bonus features.

A DAY OF JUDGMENT (Severin Films / MVD Entertainment Group): A Special Edition Blu-ray ($ 34.95 retail) of the only feature film directed by and starring CDH Reynolds, A 1981 Low Budget Supernatural Shock – Shot in North Carolina – in which the corrupt the inhabitants of a small rural town are brutally massacred for their moral transgressions. Bonuses include retrospective interviews.

DOWNSTREAM FROM KINSHASA (Icarus Films Home Video): Dieudo Hamadi’s feature-length documentary (originally titled On the way to the Millard) details the efforts of survivors of the Ugandan / Rwandan Six Day War in June 2000 which demand recognition and reparations from the government. Well-intentioned and touching at times, but his low-key approach is further undermined by a lack of momentum – at least until the last third. In Swahili with English subtitles, available on DVD (retail $ 29.98). ** ½

FOR CRAZY ONLY (Utopia Distribution / Vinegar Syndrome): Director Heather Ross makes her writing debut with this feature documentary (subtitled Del Close stories) retracing the life and career of improvisational comedy legend and teacher Del Close (1934-’99), with interviews with comedy luminaries including Dave Thomas, Bob Odenkirk, Tim Meadows, George Wendt, Jason Sudekis , Patton Oswalt, Michaela Watkins and others. The Limited Edition Blu-ray ($ 34.98 retail) features audio commentary, additional and extended interviews, vintage improv footage, a trailer, and more.

FRIDAY 13E 8-FILM COLLECTION ” (Paramount Home Entertainment): The title tells all in this Blu-ray collection ($ 79.99 retail) including the first eight films from the venerable horror franchise: Friday the 13the (1980), Friday the 13the Part 2 (nineteen eighty one), Friday the 13the Part 3 (1982), Friday the 13the: The last chapter (1984), Friday the 13the Part V: A New Beginning (1985), Friday the 13the Part VII: New blood (1987), and Friday the 13the Part VIII: Jason Takes Manhattan (1989), each is loaded with bonuses (including access to digital copies of every movie) and every movie is rated R (for obvious reasons).

PARADISE (Virgil Films / Kino Lorber): Angus Benfield wrote, produced, and directed this award-winning PG-13 faith-based drama based on the Alan Duprey novel Sky: the adventure begins, in which he portrays a disillusioned paramedic who wakes up in Heaven and finds his life made more sense than he thought, available on DVD ($ 19.95 retail).

I CARRY YOU WITH ME (Sony Pictures Home Entertainment): Writer / Producer / Director Heidi Ewing’s award-winning, fact-based, R-rated debut feature film stars detail the relationship between budding chef Armando Espita and free spirit Christian Vaszquez, and the unintended consequences the two face when the former travels to New York City to establish a career and live openly as a gay man. In Spanish with English subtitles, available on DVD ($ 21.99 retail) and Blu-ray ($ 24.99 retail).

NAKOM (Corinth Films): Producer Kelly Daniella Norris and first-time writer / producer TW Pittman co-directed this 2016 award-winning drama with Jacob Ayanaba (in his feature debut) as a young returning medical student. him in the titular Ghanaian village to take responsibility for his impoverished family, to meet resistance from the townspeople and even from his own family. In Kusaal with English subtitles, available on DVD ($ 24.95 retail).

NIGHT OF THE ANIMATED DEAD (Warner Bros. Home Entertainment): As the title suggests, this is an animated version of the 1968 horror classic by George A. Romero Night of the Living Dead, in which the dead mysteriously rise up and besiege the living on a remote farm in Pennsylvania. Surprisingly effective and unsurprisingly gory, with a range of premium voice overs including Josh Duhamel, Nancy Travis, Dulé Hill, Katharine Isabelle, James Roday Rodriguez, Katie Sackoff, Will Sasso and Jimmi Simpson. Both DVD ($ 14.99 retail) and Blu-ray combo ($ 19.99 retail) include behind-the-scenes functionality. To classify. ***

NOTORIOUS NICK (LionsGate): Cody Christian is making headlines in this factual drama as a wrestler determined to succeed in mixed martial arts despite being born with one hand. Formula but well-intentioned and watchable, thanks in large part to heartfelt performances, especially Elisabeth Rohm as Christian’s mother and especially Barry Livingston (far from My three sons) as a Support Coach, available on DVD (retail $ 19.98). Classified PG-13. **

PLAYING FRISBEE IN NORTH KOREA (Kino Lorber): Producer / director Savanna Washington has become the African-American director to direct a feature documentary in North Korea, as she explores the region’s political and social turmoil and its impact on the people, available on DVD ($ 19.95). retail).

THE WOMAN WHO CRIES (Kino Lorber Studio Classics): Olivia de Havilland brings considerable empathy (and star power) to this intermittently whimsical and effective 1972 ABC-TV adaptation of Ray Bradbury’s short story, in which she stars as a recently freed woman from At a mental institution that meets resistance when she insists, she hears a woman screaming underground. Along with the costumes by Edith Head and a score by John Williams, this is further reinforced by a cast of old pros: Joseph Cotten, Walter Pidgeon, Ed Nelson and Laraine Stephens. Both DVD ($ 14.95 retail) and Blu-ray ($ 24.95 retail) include audio commentary and trailers. ** ½

SOPHIE JONES (Oscilloscope Laboratories): Producer / Director / Co-Writer Jessie Barr’s debut feature stars her real cousin Jessica Barr (who makes her debut as a co-writer / producer) in the title role, a teenage girl from American suburb trying to come to terms with the death of her mother and her burgeoning sexuality. A compassionate coming-of-age story that benefits from Barr’s utterly believable performance, but the narrative tends to meander. Both DVD ($ 27.99 retail) and Blu-ray ($ 32.99 retail) include audio commentary, behind-the-scenes functionality, trailer, and more. ** ½

(Copyright 2021, Mark Burger)


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Prince Charles Heartbreak: Duke ‘intimidated’ at school – Students attempted to ‘whip’ heir gang | Royal | New https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/prince-charles-heartbreak-duke-intimidated-at-school-students-attempted-to-whip-heir-gang-royal-new/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/prince-charles-heartbreak-duke-intimidated-at-school-students-attempted-to-whip-heir-gang-royal-new/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 20:35:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/prince-charles-heartbreak-duke-intimidated-at-school-students-attempted-to-whip-heir-gang-royal-new/ Majesty magazine editor Ingrid Seward told GB News a story of Prince Charles while dating Gordonstoun when he was younger. Ms Seward revealed that her late husband Ross Benson went to school with Prince Charles and was quite close to the future king. But the royal commentator spoke about how Prince Charles struggled at boarding […]]]>

Majesty magazine editor Ingrid Seward told GB News a story of Prince Charles while dating Gordonstoun when he was younger. Ms Seward revealed that her late husband Ross Benson went to school with Prince Charles and was quite close to the future king. But the royal commentator spoke about how Prince Charles struggled at boarding school and was bullied, recalling a story from her husband who saw students attempting to record the Prince of Wales snoring for sale.

Speaking on GB News, host Nigel Farage asked Ms Seward if she was close to the Royal Family and asked if her husband was dating Gordonstoun.

She explained: “He let everyone know that, yes, he was in Gordonstoun with Prince Charles, in the same class.

“They became great friends and knowing Ross like me, he made sure he befriended Prince Charles.

“[Ross] loved Gordonstoun and he said Charles had a really hard time there because … if you were friends with Charles they accused you of being a sycophant.

“And if you weren’t friends with him, they would call you a bully, and Charles was bullied there.

“There was this story that I really love, and I didn’t find out until much later when Ross wrote it for an article.

“He tells this wonderful story because Prince Charles used to snore and [he was] in one of those beds near the window which remained open all summer.

“So the boys in the dormitory upstairs put a little speaker attached to a tape recorder and recorded it snoring …

“And they were going to whip the tape like ‘it’s the future snoring king’, well you can imagine when the headmaster found out.”

Ms Seward added that the gang probably still exists somewhere and Mr Farage asked her if she was a friend of the royals.

She explained that no member of the royal family was true friends of hers, as many are “just friends in themselves”.

When Charles was younger, he had no kind words to say about Gordonstroun, whom he described as “Colditz in a kilt,” but later changed his mind.

In a 1975 interview, the Prince of Wales praised the institution, which he credits for teaching it “a lot about my own abilities and disabilities.” It taught me to accept challenges and take initiative.

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In the same interview, he said he was “happy” to have attended Gordonstroun and admitted that “the harshness of the place” was “much exaggerated”.

The heir apparent also served two terms in 1966 on the Timbertop campus of Geelong Grammar School in Victoria, Australia.

Letters published by the then-teenage royal show what Charles thought about college.

He said in 1964: “It’s such a hell out here, especially at night. I hardly sleep at all these days.

“The people in my dorm are filthy. My God, they’re horrible, I don’t know how anyone can be so mean.

“They throw slippers all night or hit me with pillows or run across the room and hit me as hard as they can, then come back as fast as they can, waking everyone in the dorm by same time.

“I still wish I could come home. This place is such a hole! “


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