Boarding School – World Socialist CWI http://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ Tue, 19 Oct 2021 01:39:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4-150x150.png Boarding School – World Socialist CWI http://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ 32 32 Lakota culture teachers discuss the importance of learning local Native American history and traditions https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/lakota-culture-teachers-discuss-the-importance-of-learning-local-native-american-history-and-traditions/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/lakota-culture-teachers-discuss-the-importance-of-learning-local-native-american-history-and-traditions/#respond Mon, 18 Oct 2021 22:46:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/lakota-culture-teachers-discuss-the-importance-of-learning-local-native-american-history-and-traditions/ RAPID CITY, SD (KEVN) – A few weeks ago, Governor Kristi Noem decided to reignite the conversation about changing South Dakota’s social studies standards, potentially removing references to the state’s second population. . In the middle of the reserve, a private school immerses its students in Native American culture. “Being here at Red Cloud, their […]]]>

RAPID CITY, SD (KEVN) – A few weeks ago, Governor Kristi Noem decided to reignite the conversation about changing South Dakota’s social studies standards, potentially removing references to the state’s second population. .

In the middle of the reserve, a private school immerses its students in Native American culture.

“Being here at Red Cloud, their immersion classes and the Mackert School alone, they are very focused on the language, the culture, who they are and they speak Lakota most of the time in the other classes and here we let’s focus more on leading a healthy lifestyle through contemporary, historical and social songs and dances, ”said Jason Flags Jr., K-4 Lakota culture teacher at Red Cloud Indian School.

Between two reservations, a public school now offers its students the opportunity to discover the history and culture that surrounds them.

“We really use and allow the students to use the WoLakota project and we took it more as an open course where we learn together and we allow the students to control it in a way,” said DJ Toczek, the Lakota. culture teacher at Bennett County High School. “Maybe a bit like a college class.”

Jason Flags Jr. is a young adult Native American, distant from a generation of his grandfather who could not learn his own history and culture while in residential school.

Now the grandson takes this opportunity to teach what so many people could not learn in school.

“Going to school in Bennett County when I was young, the age of these guys, kindergarten through sixth grade, being able to do what I didn’t learn in school for the take and be able to bring it to school, to my own classroom and to have this space where I only had this space if I went to a sun dance, for me I’m very lucky to be in that position to do it, ”Flags continued.

New to Bennett County High School this year is an elective course in Lakota culture, which students of all races have enrolled in.

“The things most people don’t know when they’re in South Dakota is that there’s a lot of history, there’s a lot of recent history, but I think it’s important to learn about a variety of cultures, regardless of your culture or ethnicity. is, to learn as much as possible to make sure that you are a diverse and well-rounded individual, ”continued Toczek.

For both these educators and native descendants, the potential to overlook part of South Dakota and American history is “disheartening and unfair.”

“We have had a lot of major events that have happened here in this region that deserves state attention and deserves the attention of the whole country,” Toczek said.

“Being able to teach the truth of American history and the history of this land, and the history of all the people here, we can hug each other, kiss each other, kiss each other,” Flags concluded. “It does not belong to Native Americans, it is a human race, it is the story of a human being. And we are all human beings on this Earth.

India’s Red Cloud School is also working to expand the number of disappearing Lakota speakers through immersive classroom language and a comprehensive curriculum: Knowledgeable and Engaged Lakȟóta Leaders. With fewer than 6000 speakers fluent in Lakȟóta, there are few opportunities for young Lakóta to learn the language which is inextricably linked to their cultural heritage and identity. The first comprehensive K-12 Lakóta language program is now in its twelfth year and has improved academic performance and improved language skills at school and at home. Recent funding has helped support the development of Lakóta online multimedia tools, the creation of literature based on the Lakóta language for students and other practical opportunities to increase the use of the Lakóta language, ”said Rilda Means , with Red Cloud Indian School. “In September 2019, we announced the first Lakȟóta DualImmersion class for kindergarten students, where all subjects are taught in English and Lakȟóta, as they pass into 5th grade. To keep the language alive, over the past decade our staff, students and families have seen the positive impact of learning and practicing the Lakȟóta language. Students have developed a deeper connection to their culture and spiritual identity, which translates into extraordinary academic results. After only a few months of teaching, our kindergarten students are already reading, doing homework and singing songs in Lakȟóta! By 2023, every student attending Red Cloud’s K-5 classes will be taught using a curriculum translated into Lakóta and taught in the Lakȟóta language.

Copyright 2021 KEVN. All rights reserved.


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Teenage daughter of BBC star “kicked out of boarding school after found with drugs” https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/teenage-daughter-of-bbc-star-kicked-out-of-boarding-school-after-found-with-drugs/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/teenage-daughter-of-bbc-star-kicked-out-of-boarding-school-after-found-with-drugs/#respond Sun, 17 Oct 2021 14:53:11 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/teenage-daughter-of-bbc-star-kicked-out-of-boarding-school-after-found-with-drugs/ Sources claimed the teenager was found with drugs at school for £ 20,000 a year and her parents were asked to pick her up the next day. Teenage daughter of BBC star kicked out of boarding school after being found with drugs, it has been learned ( Image: In pictures via Getty Images) The teenage […]]]>

Sources claimed the teenager was found with drugs at school for £ 20,000 a year and her parents were asked to pick her up the next day.

Teenage daughter of BBC star kicked out of boarding school after being found with drugs, it has been learned

The teenage daughter of a BBC star has been kicked out of boarding school after being found with drugs, it has been reported.

According to sources who know the family, the girl threw herself into the party during the summer vacation and did not settle in time for the new term.

It is understood that staff at the anonymous school – who charge £ 20,000 a year for fees – have found drugs in their possession.

The parents, who cannot be named for legal reasons, were made aware of the findings on Zoom and asked to come and pick her up the next day.

A source said to the Sun : “The famous mom is disappointed and upset because she loved school and has an incredibly busy work schedule.








The parents, who cannot be named for legal reasons, were made aware of the findings on Zoom and asked to come and pick her up the next day.
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Picture:

Getty Images)



“Both parents begged to let her stay, but the chief has one hit and you’re out of politics.

“It’s a shame because she was popular and brilliant even though she was distracted by extracurricular activities.

“The star had her own issues with the party, so don’t blame her. She just doesn’t want her to waste her opportunities.”

The girl’s parents would be keen to find another school for their daughter as soon as possible.


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American mom in the UK school system: what it looks like https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/american-mom-in-the-uk-school-system-what-it-looks-like/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/american-mom-in-the-uk-school-system-what-it-looks-like/#respond Thu, 14 Oct 2021 14:02:54 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/american-mom-in-the-uk-school-system-what-it-looks-like/ As an American raising children in England. I have grown to love school uniforms. Everything has a different meaning: public schools are not free. College is not higher education. Because the program is so different, I also feel like I’m back in school. Loading Something is loading. As an American raising children in England, a […]]]>
  • As an American raising children in England. I have grown to love school uniforms.
  • Everything has a different meaning: public schools are not free. College is not higher education.
  • Because the program is so different, I also feel like I’m back in school.

As an American raising children in England, a lot is lost in the translation, even though I don’t speak a foreign language.

Getting to know the education system here has been a particular challenge: the English-style button-up uniforms and boarding schools couldn’t be more different from my super-liberal school experience in New York.

Public schools are not free and college is not higher education

It doesn’t help that the vocabulary here is the same, but the meanings of the words are so different. I come from a place where public schools are open to everyone. Here, they are usually the oldest, most expensive and chicest boarding schools in the country. Thus, in the United Kingdom, public schools are private schools. This is the fanciest type of private school you can get, and it usually has a boarding component.

“College” is another word that means something completely different depending on what country you are in. In the UK, it’s a reference to sixth-grade college – the last two years of “high school” and the A-level exams that prepare you for college (what Americans would call college). You can also get 100% professional and non-university higher education.

Even kindergarten has a different name in the UK: welcome, followed by first grade, second grade, etc. While you could assume this is grade one, grade two, etc. in the US, that would be way too easy. Children start school earlier in the UK, so an 11-year-old here and a 10-year-old in the US could be three years apart, depending on what time of year their birthdays fall.

Public versus private education is a hot topic in the UK, with frequent debates over whether private schools should be abolished or taxed more heavily, and what percentage of students educated by the The state should be represented in leading universities. High schools are also contentious. These are highly selective academic schools that admit students on the basis of arduous testing at age 11 – they are simply the top performing schools in local and national rankings, and most importantly, they are free.

To sum up: public school is free, high school is free for smart kids, and private school costs money. Religious schools are also completely free.

In London, competition for the best schools is fierce. Parents must register babies “from birth” if they want to have a chance to enter. There are also around 500 boarding schools in the UK, and some accept children as young as 7 years old.

As single-sex schools become less popular, they still seem quite ubiquitous in the private sector. Most of the secondary schools in my patch of London are not coeducational.

Most children wear uniforms

Even school uniforms have become politicized here. The question of whether they are “repressive” has recently been debated in the House of Lords. They are certainly expensive, averaging 213 pounds per child each year, and over 90% of English schools are thought to have uniforms.

Repressive or not, they make children look like attractive extras in a period film: breeches, culottes, straw boaters, pinafore dresses, ties, hats and kilts have all been spotted on private students. The uniforms change from season to season, and children have separate uniforms for physical education and any specific sports they play.

My children are happy, enthusiastic, and appreciate school for its social and academic benefits. I even almost got used to the annual tradition of seeing them tied up like innkeepers, stars and sheep as they perform in the annual Christmas Nativity play – something that happens in every school here, denominational or not.

As the curriculum is so different here, from topics covered in history and geography to the authors they read in English, I almost feel like I’m in school again, discovering and learning with them.


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The former Native residential school still exists at Lac du Flambeau https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/the-former-native-residential-school-still-exists-at-lac-du-flambeau/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/the-former-native-residential-school-still-exists-at-lac-du-flambeau/#respond Tue, 12 Oct 2021 22:59:09 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/the-former-native-residential-school-still-exists-at-lac-du-flambeau/ Many of these Wisconsin schools were demolished and the land they were on is now privately owned, making it more difficult to find whether Wisconsin would have burial sites similar to those found in Canada. But a structure of that painful part of history still stands in the Northwoods of Wisconsin. “It’s a really traumatic […]]]>

Many of these Wisconsin schools were demolished and the land they were on is now privately owned, making it more difficult to find whether Wisconsin would have burial sites similar to those found in Canada.

But a structure of that painful part of history still stands in the Northwoods of Wisconsin.

“It’s a really traumatic story for Native Americans, but it’s also a story that needs to be told,” said Sarah Schuman. Schuman is the tribal historical preservative for the Lac du Flambeau tribe. She heard directly from family and tribe members what happened within these walls.

“When they first came here they had to have their hair cut, their braids were taken, they were told to wear dresses, shoes, hats, if they spoke their language they were punished. As for the punishment, we don’t know what it was. ”

These schools were operating at a time known as the Age of Assimilation. Families were forced to send their children to these schools and leave behind their families, their culture and their identity.

“It was just to get them used to white culture.”

The Flambeau Lake boarding school operated from 1895 to 1932. During this time, hundreds of Native American children were taken from their families for education under the US federal government.

According to records, the majority of the children there were from the Potawatomi, Ho Chunk and Menominee tribes. There were a few children from Lac du Flambeau because their villages were right across the lake from the boarding school complex but that changed quickly.

“Some kids would run away,” Schuman said, “and then people would have to go back and sort of argue over the kids. So eventually what they started to do was send the kids out of the lake. du Flambeau off reserve to other residential schools to make it more difficult for them to return to their families. ”

Each year at the school, they housed over 150 students and several staff members each year. He said it was a school for children between the ages of 5 and 8, but accounts and photos from tribes suggest it even started at a younger age.

“Some of the kids seem smaller than the age of 5. What was happening was that a lot of communities were saying their kid was only 3 or 4 and they ended up taking a tape measure and if the ‘kid was as tall as a yard or taller, they would just take the kids out no matter if they were 3 or 4 years old. ”

The building that still stands has witnessed a painful part of tribal history, but now sees a bright future for the tribe and its people.

“It’s a bit like putting our foot on the ground. No need to deprive ourselves of our culture anymore,” said Schuman. “We are just trying to preserve this as future generations advance.”

The building and grounds are now used for classes to teach tribe members their language, arts and a place to celebrate their culture. ”

“Teaching our kids about our culture, rather than just a side of the culture they only know from the history books.”

According to the Lac du Flambeau tribe, at this time, their boarding school is not under investigation by the US Department of the Interior. We asked them if they knew of any burial sites in the area. According to Schuman, given that the area around it has been developed over the past two decades, it is difficult for them to determine whether there are – or had been – burial sites around the school.


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River’s Edge Theater Company to present RIVERSIDE HAUNTS this month https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/rivers-edge-theater-company-to-present-riverside-haunts-this-month/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/rivers-edge-theater-company-to-present-riverside-haunts-this-month/#respond Sat, 09 Oct 2021 22:41:15 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/rivers-edge-theater-company-to-present-riverside-haunts-this-month/ River’s Edge Theater Company presents “Riverside Haunts”, a chilling storytelling performance that perfectly blends Hudson Valley history, creative fiction and live music. The show will take place October 28-29 (rain date is October 30) outside at the Good Witch Coffee Bar in Hastings on Hudson, NY. Show time is at 7 p.m. Five ghosts share […]]]>

River’s Edge Theater Company presents “Riverside Haunts”, a chilling storytelling performance that perfectly blends Hudson Valley history, creative fiction and live music. The show will take place October 28-29 (rain date is October 30) outside at the Good Witch Coffee Bar in Hastings on Hudson, NY. Show time is at 7 p.m. Five ghosts share their spooky stories about love, hate, and what it means to live and die by the Hudson River. Recommended for an adult audience only.

Local actors Ed Herbstman (Hastings on Hudson), Jessica carmen (Ossining), Traci Redmond (Dobbs Ferry), Mika Wurf (Dobbs Ferry) and Bryant Lewis (Bronx) will embody the ghosts of the bygone era of Rivertown. Local musicians Joanna Levine and Jupiter Dune will provide the musical score. Meghan Covington, artistic director and co-founder of River’s Edge Theater Co., will be the playwright and director of the show.

The five stories featured in “Riverside Haunts” are inspired by the history of Rivertown in the Lower Hudson Valley from colonial times through the 1940s. The Hastings Historical Society, Ardsley Historical Society, and area history books and articles have helped bring these stories to life.

“Lavender Lady”, played by Jessica carmen, is inspired by the spirit of a young immigrant who is said to reside in the famous Armor-Stiner Octagon House in Irvington. Carl Cramer, the well-known writer who lived in the Octagon House published a story describing the origins of the ghost as well as his own encounter with the spirit while living in the iconic residence. In the tale “Riverside Haunts” we hear his side of the story.

“The New Girl,” played by Mika Wurf, tells the story of a city girl who leaves her apartment to live at the Ardsley Heights Country School for Girls. The school served as a boarding school for Ardsley. NY in the 1940s, and the book “Sunday” by Tina Louise (Tina played Ginger from Gilligan’s Island) inspired this story. Tina wrote the book as a memoir about her time at school, revealing horrific memories of how she was treated as a student. River’s Edge Theater co-founders Meghan and David Covington currently live in the former school dormitory with their three daughters. “The New Girl” ends up enjoying her time at school … until she gets into trouble.

“The Hermit”, played by Ed Herbstman, is based on the tales of the Irvington hermit who once lived alone in the Irvington Woods in the mid-19th century. Historians say the hermit spoke several languages, bathed in the Saw Mill River, and slept in his own coffin for the latter part of his life. His grave can still be found on the trail today by following the Hermit’s Grave (HG) trail markers. In “The Hermit” we learn more about this mysterious character and his strange ways.

“The Captive”, played by Traci Redmond, takes place among the Weckquaesgeek tribe who resided at Dobbs Ferry near Wicker Creek. This story was inspired by a historical account that colonial women who were taken captive by Native Americans often decided to stay with the tribes. Women were held in higher esteem in Native American circles compared to the European patriarchal view. What happens when the Dutch find out their wives want to stay?

“The Visitor”, played by Bryant Lewis, is inspired by the old Chauncey house that was abandoned and left in the woods at Dobbs Ferry in the mid-19th century. The structure became known as the “haunted house” before it was demolished and replaced by the children’s village. This story also includes facts about Dudley’s Grove, which was a steamboat excursion destination in the 19th century. In “The Visitor”, a town man finds more adventures than he expected.

“These stories will appeal to both history buffs and horror fans,” said writer / director Meghan Covington. She also points out that River’s Edge Theater Co’s mission to inspire social change plays a big part in this production. Social injustice and discrimination will be addressed in these disturbing stories. “Our society is rife with some pretty fierce demons, so members of the public can expect to explore deep-rooted issues that still haunt America today.”

For tickets and more information visit www.riversedgeheatre.com/onstage.


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“To bring them home like the bosses they are:” Send more children from the Carlisle Indian school https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/to-bring-them-home-like-the-bosses-they-are-send-more-children-from-the-carlisle-indian-school/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/to-bring-them-home-like-the-bosses-they-are-send-more-children-from-the-carlisle-indian-school/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 03:06:17 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/to-bring-them-home-like-the-bosses-they-are-send-more-children-from-the-carlisle-indian-school/ SIOUX FALLS, SD (KELO) – Native American boarding schools are a dark piece of United States history. One of the first was the Carlisle Indian School in Pennsylvania, where nearly 200 children died from 1879 to 1919. Some of these children have ties to South Dakota. Last July, the remains of nine Native American children […]]]>

SIOUX FALLS, SD (KELO) – Native American boarding schools are a dark piece of United States history. One of the first was the Carlisle Indian School in Pennsylvania, where nearly 200 children died from 1879 to 1919. Some of these children have ties to South Dakota.

Last July, the remains of nine Native American children who died at the Carlisle Indian School were brought home to the Rosebud Sioux tribe. Today, a South Dakota lawmaker and historian is working to bring more children home to the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate and Spirit Lake Nation.

“It is with the understanding that we are here because of them,” said Tamara St. John, tribal historian for Sisseton Wahpeton Oytae. “We’re here because of their prayers, their will to survive their fight to, you know, ensure that we have life.”

From left to right: Nancy Renville, Emily Justine LaFramboise, Edward Upwright, John Renville, George Walker at Carlisle Indian School in 1879. Not pictured: Amos LaFramboise. Photo courtesy of Tamara St. John.

The children in this photo, and one not in the photo, were the first to leave the Sisseton area and attend Carlisle Indian School in 1879. Over a century later, two of those six children are still in Pennsylvania.

Amos LaFramboise died 20 days after arriving in Carlisle. He was the first to die at school. Her sister, Emily Justine LaFramboise was later able to return home to the Lake Traverse reserve.

“Who is the son of Mr. Joseph LaFramboise who is one of us, and to use a description that I think the rest of the world could understand, one of our founding fathers,” said St. John.

Edward Upwright is the other child St. John wants to bring home. He was the son of a Chief of the Spirit Lake Nation.

“The idea that this traditional chief Waanataan Nupa, which in our language means two, he was the second, is his boy,” said St. John.

John and Nancy Renville were the children of former Sisseton Wahpeton chief Gabriel Renville. John Renville also died at the Carlisle Indian School. However, his father was able to get there and bring his remains home. Around this time, he also brought Nancy home.

“That said his sister adored him, his little sister, by his side and he had a distant look in his eyes as he spoke, spoke calmly to his sister,” said St. John. “And I can only imagine that he takes care of his sister like, shall we say, on his trip. What a loving and powerful thing to do.

Amos LaFramboise, John Renville and Edward Upwright each died of illnesses contracted at school.

“There is also the search or concern for any physical abuse and I will not at all minimize that understanding among our people because associated with our residential schools was a lot of violence,” said St. John.

George Walker was the last boy in the group at Carlisle. He was able to leave the Carlisle Indian School and settle on the Lake Traverse reservation. Shortly after, he passed away. The four boys had left in 1881. George Walker is believed to be an orphan.

“He has written letters and it is clear to me through his letters that he hopes to return home,” St. John said. “He wants to go home. I would even dare to say that he is alone.

With the family ties between Amos LaFramboise and Edward Upwright, it is important that their remains be sent home.

“To bring them home like the chefs they are,” St. John said. “You know these young men, they were that hope for our next generation, you know, and we have to bring them home with honor.”

And St. John is confident that they will do just that.

“I see nothing will stop us from making sure these things are ready,” said St. John. “Everything is rolling now, there is no turning back.”

The hope is to bring Amos LaFramboise and Edward Upwright home next summer.


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Churches are holding a Day of Truth and Repentance today to recognize their role in cultural genocide | Opinion https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/churches-are-holding-a-day-of-truth-and-repentance-today-to-recognize-their-role-in-cultural-genocide-opinion/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/churches-are-holding-a-day-of-truth-and-repentance-today-to-recognize-their-role-in-cultural-genocide-opinion/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 13:12:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/churches-are-holding-a-day-of-truth-and-repentance-today-to-recognize-their-role-in-cultural-genocide-opinion/ By Reverend Victoria A. Rebeck First Nations Pennsylvanians still bear the scars of their ancestors from the physical, emotional and cultural abuse they endured in residential schools established in the late 19th century. Churches, which bear the shame of having run many of these schools, celebrate a Day of Truth and Repentance on October 6 […]]]>

By Reverend Victoria A. Rebeck

First Nations Pennsylvanians still bear the scars of their ancestors from the physical, emotional and cultural abuse they endured in residential schools established in the late 19th century. Churches, which bear the shame of having run many of these schools, celebrate a Day of Truth and Repentance on October 6 to recognize their role in the cultural genocide.

This date recognizes the 142nd anniversary of the founding of the Carlisle Industrial School, the first such school founded by the US government. According to Associated Press.

These schools were designed to “assimilate” Native American children. Their languages, cultures, names and religions have sometimes been literally beaten to them. In the case of schools run by the church, children were forced to adopt Christian practices.

Students have experienced physical, sexual, cultural and spiritual abuse and neglect, says the National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition. For speaking their mother tongue, the children were punished, sometimes to the point of torture. Many children have never seen their homes again, and not all the missing were counted.

Elsie, a Yakima woman forced into one of these schools, recounted interview Denise Lajimodière, “I was four years old when I was robbed and taken to Chemawa, Oregon. The matron grabbed me and my sister, undressed us and put us in a trough and cleaned our genitals with laundry soap, shouting at us that we were “dirty savages, dirty”. I had to tiptoe around screaming in pain.

Residential schools also served as a strategy to subdue Native American tribes. Lt. Col. Richard Henry Pratt, who promoted the establishment of the Carlisle School, recruited students from the Sioux Oglala and Sioux Brule, essentially holding these children hostage in an attempt to gain tribal cooperation with the government. American.

Schools damaged Native American nations at the individual, family and community levels. The children lost their identity, suffered from low self-esteem, felt no sense of security, and found it difficult to form healthy relationships. Parents lost their rights and power to care for and guide their children, and the extended family system was almost completely destroyed.

Communities have been severely weakened as their languages ​​and tribal traditions have been lost for a number of generations. In turn, the structure of tribal nations began to crumble and fewer people were enrolled.

These schools betray the values ​​the church found in their own scriptures. From the Hebrew Bible to the Gospels and Epistles, believers learn to welcome and serve their neighbors with kindness. The needs of children, widows, the poor and other neglected people had to come before the interests of the rich and powerful.

Through the prophet Isaiah, God identifies it as the highest religious practice: “Is not the fast that I choose: to loosen the bonds of injustice, to undo the bonds of the yoke, to free the oppressed and break all yoke? Is it not to share your bread with the hungry, and to bring the poor homeless into your house; when you see the nudes, to cover them up, and not to hide from your own parents? (Isaiah 58: 5-6)

Jesus taught his disciples to serve others humbly, not to destroy them with abusive and arrogant power: “For all that exalt themselves will be humbled, and those that humble themselves will be exalted” (Luke 14:11) .

At the request of the United Methodist Native American International Caucus, United Methodist Bishops urge churches to take these steps:

  • Learn more about the violence committed by these boarding schools
  • On October 6, wear the color orange in solidarity with others who stand up for the truth and fight against violence
  • Hold prayer circles and sacred gatherings to remember our children and invite others to join
  • Advocate for federal, state and local government officials and religious leaders to investigate and bring the truth to light on the massacre of Native American children, peoples and culture, especially in the context of boarding schools
  • Call for the return of the remains of deceased children to schools in their family homeland
  • Talk about the trauma that has been passed down from generation to generation in First Nations communities
  • Persevere in governmental, ecclesiastical and private organization institutions responsible for restitution

The Presbyterian, Quaker and Episcopal churches are taking similar steps.

While the horrors of residential schools are remembered for a day, let churches commit to repentance and restitution until Indigenous peoples and cultures receive the honor and respect they deserve as Americans.

Reverend Victoria Rebeck is a United Methodist clergyman and director of connectional ministries for the United Methodist Church’s annual Susquehanna Conference in Mechanicsburg.


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Interior to Hold Tribal Consultations on Federal Residential Schools Initiative | New https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/interior-to-hold-tribal-consultations-on-federal-residential-schools-initiative-new/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/interior-to-hold-tribal-consultations-on-federal-residential-schools-initiative-new/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 21:46:24 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/interior-to-hold-tribal-consultations-on-federal-residential-schools-initiative-new/ WASHINGTON – On September 30, the Home Office announced it would begin tribal consultations as the next step in the Federal Indian Residential Schools Initiative, a comprehensive review of the troubled legacy of U.S. residential school policies. In June, Home Secretary Deb Haaland announcement the initiative directing the DOI, under the supervision of Assistant Secretary […]]]>

WASHINGTON – On September 30, the Home Office announced it would begin tribal consultations as the next step in the Federal Indian Residential Schools Initiative, a comprehensive review of the troubled legacy of U.S. residential school policies.

In June, Home Secretary Deb Haaland announcement the initiative directing the DOI, under the supervision of Assistant Secretary of Indian Affairs Bryan Newland, to prepare a report detailing available historical documents, with an emphasis on potential cemeteries or burial sites, regarding the federal program of boarding school for future action.

In letters to tribal chiefs on September 30, the DOI called on tribal governments, Alaska Native societies, and Hawaiian Indigenous organizations to provide commentary on key issues to be included in the DOI’s report and help shape the basis for future work on the site to protect potential burial sites and other sensitive information.

“I launched the Federal Indian Residential Schools Initiative to begin the long healing process that our country must tackle in order to build a future we can all be proud of,” said Haaland. “As we move forward, working with tribal nations is essential to deal with this legacy with transparency and accountability. Tribal consultations are at the heart of this long and painful process of redressing the intergenerational trauma of residential schools and shedding light on the truth in a way that honors those we have lost and those who continue to suffer trauma.

Newland said engaging the tribes is a “necessary step” as the DOI sheds light on what happened in federal residential schools and charts a “way forward”.

“These conversations will not be easy, but they are essential as we are truly investigating the legacy left by these institutions,” he said.

In order to facilitate discussion during the consultations, participants are requested to address the following topics:

· Appropriate protocols for handling sensitive information in existing files;

· The means to respond to cultural concerns and to process information generated from existing records or potential work activities on the site;

· The potential repatriation of human remains, including cultural concerns and compliance with the law on the protection and repatriation of Native American graves;

· Future implementation of policies and procedures to protect burial sites, sites, confidential information and culturally sensitive information;

· Management of former boarding schools sites;

· Confidentiality issues or cultural concerns to be identified within the framework of the Initiative; and

· Other issues the DOI should address in their review.

The formal consultations mark a new phase in the ongoing work of this initiative, says DOI. The ministry also says agency staff compile decades of files and records to facilitate proper review to organize documents, identify available and missing information, and ensure record systems are in place. standardized.

The DOI also states that it is building a framework for how it will partner with outside organizations to guide the next steps in the review. Additionally, leaders are working with the Indian Health Service to develop culturally appropriate support resources for those who may experience trauma as a result of the initiative. This work will result in the submission of a final written report on the investigation to Haaland by April 1.


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Long game: Father Watters develops the Jesuit “ecosystem” to encompass kindergarten through high school https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/long-game-father-watters-develops-the-jesuit-ecosystem-to-encompass-kindergarten-through-high-school/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/long-game-father-watters-develops-the-jesuit-ecosystem-to-encompass-kindergarten-through-high-school/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 00:11:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/long-game-father-watters-develops-the-jesuit-ecosystem-to-encompass-kindergarten-through-high-school/ Justin Fowlkes, left to right, Jesuit Father William Watters and Kintrez Fowkles stroll around the Loyola Blakefield campus in Towson. (Kevin J. Parks / CR staff) Kevin Marshall spent the summer touring the Western National Parks, pursuing a passion he traced back to an eighth grade immersion experience in the Grand Tetons. DeJonna Farmer uses […]]]>
Justin Fowlkes, left to right, Jesuit Father William Watters and Kintrez Fowkles stroll around the Loyola Blakefield campus in Towson. (Kevin J. Parks / CR staff)

Kevin Marshall spent the summer touring the Western National Parks, pursuing a passion he traced back to an eighth grade immersion experience in the Grand Tetons.

DeJonna Farmer uses her degree from Stevenson University as a Marketing Coordinator for the Greater Baltimore Economic Alliance.

Farmer attended Cristo Rey Jesuit High School in Fells Point. Marshall is one of three alumni of the faculty of St. Ignatius Loyola Academy in Federal Hill, the boy’s college that has broadened its horizons.

Both came through a Jesuit educational “ecosystem” in Baltimore City that is the inspiration of Jesuit Father William J. Watters. He is 87 years old and last month announced his intention to expand a kindergarten based in St. Ignatius Parish to Loyola School, a school that will also serve students from grades 1 to 4.

High school tuition is capped at $ 2,500. The other two are free. All of them depend heavily on sponsors.

“Father Bill has an incredible quality,” said Earl Linehan, a parishioner from St. Ignatius who helped start St. Ignatius Loyola Academy and is on the board of directors of Cristo Rey Jesuit. “People want to help him, because there’s never anything about him in there. There is no ego. His people have a hard time saying no because they know he is doing good.

In 1952, fresh out of St. Peter’s Preparatory in Jersey City, NJ, Bill Watters climbed from a train platform at Penn Station in Baltimore and discovered life south of the Mason-Dixon Line.

“I walked into the great hall and saw ‘white’ bathrooms and ‘colorful’ bathrooms,” he said. “The exits were marked in the same way. I said, ‘Wow, it’s a different world.’ “

The recent graduates of the Loyola Early Learning Center are now called The Loyola School, where they will be on their way to becoming its first fourth graders as the school grows in Mount Vernon. (Courtesy Marie Machin / Loyola Early Learning Center)

Seeking to enter the Society of Jesus, he walked to 740 N. Calvert St. St. Ignatius Church opened there in 1856, a year after the Jesuits of Maryland established a school that became what is now Loyola Maryland and Loyola Blakefield University.

“The great task of the Jesuits, their mission, was to educate the poor,” said Father Watters. This is what we have done here.

His affinity for education included teaching at Loyola Blakefield. He had two terms as parish priest of Saint-Ignace, where he remains assistant priest; ran a retreat center; and kept an eye on 215 priests.

The Jesuits encouraged service in Africa. He went there on sabbatical, fell in love with the people of Nigeria and eventually returned as pastor of a parish where Mass was in the thousands.

Father Watters saw “all these young Nigerian scholastics enter Catholic schools which are not our schools”, and created a steering committee which led, in 1996, to the opening of Loyola Jesuit College, a secondary boarding school. mixed with 600 students in Abuja.

By then, heart disease had sent Father Watters back to Baltimore, where he had already opened a school.

Opportunity, experience

In 1993 he founded St. Ignatius Loyola Academy, with $ 150,000 from the Jesuits and a matching grant from the Abell Foundation. In 2013, the school moved from the cramped quarters of Calvert Street to the former South Baltimore Catholic Community School on the St. Mary’s, Star of the Sea campus.

Kneeling Adewale Otusajo and, left to right, Sterling Holliday, Cristian Quesada, Zonte Painter, Dominic Marine, Aaron Sievers, Jerry Watkins and Howard Wicker graduated from St. Ignatius Loyola Academy and then Cristo Rey Jesuit in 2019 ( Credit: Grant Gibson / Jesuit Lycée Cristo Rey)

Marshall, the fan of national parks, learned in the first and teaches social science and reading in the second.

“This school offered opportunities and experiences that I might not have had (otherwise),” Marshall said. “Some of our boys can’t mark Maryland on a map when they come to see us. Until I got there I couldn’t locate Wyoming on a map.

Marshall experienced more Jesuit rigor at Loyola Blakefield, Wheeling Jesuit University in West Virginia, and Loyola University Maryland, where he received his Masters in Education. Kintrez Fowlkes, among the triplets of the class of 2017, had a similar experience.

“They had Latin in St. Ignatius Loyola,” Fowlkes said. “I didn’t realize how much that put me forward until I got to Loyola Blakefield.”

His brothers, Justin and Tre, went to Archbishop Curley High and Baltimore City College, respectively. All are freshmen at Towson University, among 567 St. Ignatius Loyola graduates who have also attended service academies and Ivy League schools.

Father Watters resigned as president in 2004 and said to himself, “We have to have a high school for these kids. Following a model he observed in Chicago and with considerable human capital from Loyola University Maryland, Cristo Rey Jesuit opened in 2007.

Farmer, the Marketing Director, is one of its 714 graduates. Students at CRJ supplement tuition through an internship program, which sent her to an adult daycare, an insurance company in Owings Mills, and a children’s museum.

DeJonna Farmer and Kevin Marshall benefited from the educational vision of Jesuit Father William Watters. (Courtesy photos)

“The academics were also top notch,” Farmer said. “In my second year, I was at a point of a higher grade in Spanish. I argued for this B-plus, but my teacher said, “You haven’t done the homework for this extra point. That’s not how we do it at Cristo Rey Jesuit. ‘ “

These internships are among the reasons CRJ is the only school in the Archdiocese of Baltimore to require COVID-19 vaccines for teachers and students.

The next stop for Father Watters is Loyola School, which plans to accommodate 200 students from preschool to grade 4.

“We will certainly find a way, with the grace of God,” he told the Review.

For two days in mid-September, half a dozen teens and pre-teens were among the victims of gun violence in Baltimore City, which could exceed 300 murders for a seventh year in a row.

“I don’t know of a better way out of some of the city’s problems than education,” said Linehan, president of Brown Advisory, an investment management firm. “I take my hat off to Father Watters and all the people who are trying to solve this problem.”

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Another Voice: Residential School Trauma Still Affects Indigenous Communities | Opinion https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/another-voice-residential-school-trauma-still-affects-indigenous-communities-opinion/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/another-voice-residential-school-trauma-still-affects-indigenous-communities-opinion/#respond Sat, 02 Oct 2021 23:00:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/another-voice-residential-school-trauma-still-affects-indigenous-communities-opinion/ We know that thousands of children died in schools. The deaths of hundreds, if not thousands, are believed to have gone unreported. These young lives were extinguished for a reason – their legacy did not fit the mold of what white settlers believed to be appropriate. These heinous crimes can never and should never be […]]]>

We know that thousands of children died in schools. The deaths of hundreds, if not thousands, are believed to have gone unreported. These young lives were extinguished for a reason – their legacy did not fit the mold of what white settlers believed to be appropriate. These heinous crimes can never and should never be forgotten.

Indigenous people around the world, including many Senecs, still bear the scars and terror of that time. The sounds and memories of their experience can never be silenced.

Finds like those from old schools in Canada earlier this year, where the remains of nearly 1,000 children were found in mass graves, reopen these wounds. It is almost certain that there will be more horrific finds at other sites. Yet the majority of non-natives ignore this dark chapter of history.

In the years since the schools were closed, some, including the Government of Canada and Catholic bishops, formally apologized for their role in the terror perpetuated by residential schools. Others made no formal acknowledgment of the human and cultural damage that occurred under their watch, preferring to remain silent and close their eyes to what they left behind in the past.

If this is truly the time of truth and healing, all residential schools, whether federal, state or private, must be reviewed.


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