Residential Private Schools – World Socialist CWI http://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ Tue, 19 Oct 2021 13:44:02 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4-150x150.png Residential Private Schools – World Socialist CWI http://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ 32 32 Meet the Candidate: Lisa Henderson for Gaithersburg City Council https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/meet-the-candidate-lisa-henderson-for-gaithersburg-city-council/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/meet-the-candidate-lisa-henderson-for-gaithersburg-city-council/#respond Tue, 19 Oct 2021 12:53:30 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/meet-the-candidate-lisa-henderson-for-gaithersburg-city-council/ GAITHERSBURG, MD – Voters in Gaithersburg will have the opportunity to elect a new mayor and two city councilors in the November 2 election this year. Patch contacted all of the candidates and asked them to share with readers why they think they are the best choice on the ballot. Lisa Henderson, candidate for city […]]]>

GAITHERSBURG, MD – Voters in Gaithersburg will have the opportunity to elect a new mayor and two city councilors in the November 2 election this year.

Patch contacted all of the candidates and asked them to share with readers why they think they are the best choice on the ballot. Lisa Henderson, candidate for city council, completed the survey.
Early voting for the Gaithersburg election will take place at the Bohrer Park Activity Center on Saturday and Sunday, October 23 and 24, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The ordinary vote will also take place on November 2 at the activity center.

Candidate

54

Position sought (mayor, municipal council, school board, etc.)

Not included

Family

I have 5 siblings, 9 nieces and nephews, 3 grandnieces and nephews, and a community of people around me that I have learned to call family

Does anyone in your family work in politics or in government?

I work in local government and two of my sisters are MCPS educators. My mom is a retired school bus driver and union leader and one brother is a retired law enforcement officer

Education

BS in Computer and Information Science from the University of Maryland University College and an MA in Technical Management from Johns Hopkins University

Occupation

I work for the Montgomery County Government as the Computer Program Director for the Integrated Justice and Information System Program, where I provide automation to the county’s public safety and criminal justice agencies. I worked for the county for 16 years

Previous or current office elected or appointed

Nothing

Campaign website

www.lisahenderson.org

Why are you looking for an elective position?

As a native of Montgomery County and a resident of Gaithersburg for 25 years, I have witnessed the city’s growth and challenges. I personally know a once thriving Olde Towne and bustling Lakeforest mall. I know the government and I know the data and I want to lead from a pragmatic and data-driven approach. I’ve used data to serve people throughout my career, and I’m ready to use it to improve the lives of people in Gaithersburg. I want to be a voice on council to champion visions of revitalization and economic growth as we continue to build on the strengths of our beautifully diverse and urban city.

The most pressing issue facing our (council, district, etc.) is _______, and that’s what I intend to do about it.

Accessible / Affordable Housing – Gaithersburg achieves an estimated housing cost burden of 35%, where landlords and renters spend more than 30% of their income on housing costs, which is higher than the national average of 32%. Projections show continued population growth in Gaithersburg and the city has reached its limit of undeveloped land to develop for new affordable housing. As a council member, I would review the city’s current zoning laws and support strategic changes for residential and commercial areas to meet the land use needs of a growing urban community.

What are the critical differences between you and other candidates for this position?

As a native, I have witnessed both the growth and the struggles of the city. I personally know as a child and as an adult a thriving Olde Towne neighborhood and vibrant Lakeforest shopping center and will work to bring these businesses and communities into the innovative and urban fold of Gaithersburg. Additionally, I work and understand local government, the complexity of government tax structures, and the financial challenges of meeting public needs and economic growth.

If you are a challenger, in what way has the current board or leader failed the community (or district or constituency)

I am not a challenger to any current job holder

How do you think the local authorities reacted to the coronavirus? What if something would you have done differently?

As the IT lead for the implementation of the Montgomery County COVID-19 testing solution and vaccine registration site, I had an overview of the work and decisions related to COVID-19 that took place across the county. No one with any experience in driving residents safely during a pandemic, so I take my hat off to the performance of local authorities. It wasn’t all done perfectly, and some things weren’t done right, but the safety of residents has always been the primary focus, including when Gaithersburg was identified as a COVID-19 hotspot and targeted interventions were carried out. been applied.

Describe the other issues that define your campaign platform.

Job Skills Training – As Gaithersburg strives to become a national center for biotechnology and bioscience, it is important to me that these companies use the talent of Gaithersburg residents to develop their workforce. This gives city council the opportunity to develop and / or support public-private partnerships, city-private sector collaboration, educate Gaithersburg residents, include high school and college graduates and those who are looking for a career change, to become a valuable talent resource for these companies, which I salute for choosing Gaithersburg as their business house

What accomplishments in your past would you cite as proof that you can handle this job?

I am an IT professional and a self-proclaimed data addict. Government has always been a big data collector, but hasn’t always had the tools or the technology to use that data effectively and meaningfully. I understand these capabilities. For example, a big topic of conversation in the city is about green spaces and parks and the challenges of where to build more or remove space to make way for schools or businesses. As cities become smarter, sensors are used to detect human traffic in parks or other green spaces to determine usage, empirically validating future needs. I understand these cutting-edge technologies and how to partner with other public or private sectors to move our city forward in this way.

The best advice ever shared with me was:

Make your own race.

What would you like voters to know about yourself and your positions?

I come from a family of civil servants and civil servants, union representatives, pastors, teachers and law enforcement, to name a few. As far as I can remember, my siblings and I have been encouraged to serve others. I always took a behind-the-scenes approach until 2018, when I worked on the front of a local campaign as the African-American campaign liaison and watched the candidate work tirelessly simply because ‘he wanted to make the community better for everyone. and the seat he was seeking would give him the opportunity to do so. I am running for Gaithersburg City Council because it will place me in a position of great capacity to serve and work together, in a transparent manner, with the citizens of Gaithersburg to build on the strengths of our city. Gaithersburg has been my home for many years. I want to continue to make it a place of innovation and community


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Telangana: Private schools to reopen hostels after Dasara break | Hyderabad News https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/telangana-private-schools-to-reopen-hostels-after-dasara-break-hyderabad-news/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/telangana-private-schools-to-reopen-hostels-after-dasara-break-hyderabad-news/#respond Sun, 17 Oct 2021 23:00:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/telangana-private-schools-to-reopen-hostels-after-dasara-break-hyderabad-news/ HYDERABAD: While the Telangana High Court has yet to deliver its verdict on reopening residential schools, private schools in the city and elsewhere in the state have decided to open homes this week. Private schools, which will reopen on Monday after Dasara’s vacation, will also open hostels because those who study in boarding schools fail […]]]>
HYDERABAD: While the Telangana High Court has yet to deliver its verdict on reopening residential schools, private schools in the city and elsewhere in the state have decided to open homes this week.
Private schools, which will reopen on Monday after Dasara’s vacation, will also open hostels because those who study in boarding schools fail to learn even as their peers take physical classes. There are over 10,000 private schools and around 3,000 hostels run by private school principals across Telangana
“While many of us have already opened hostels, the rest will be reopening hostels from Monday. We have already informed parents and many are ready to send their children to hostels, ”said Y Shekhar Rao Y, president of the Telangana Recognized School Management Association (TRSMA), which has more than 10,000 low budget schools among its members. members. The TRSMA president said most of the boarding schools were located in Hyderabad, Karimnagar, Warangal, Khammam, Nizamabad, among other districts.
Heads of budget schools said parents asked them to reopen hostels citing a loss of learning. They claimed that although the High Court ordered the state not to reopen boarding schools, this does not apply to private schools because the education department of public schools does not recognize the hostels.
Principals have said they will face a loss if they do not reopen hostels as parents seek other options near their residences and they could lose admissions to nearby public schools or private schools. “We hope that attendance will increase within a week or so. Soon we will also be launching hostels for all classes, ”said S Srinivas Reddy, who runs a private school in the city.
Managers said they were prepared to take the risk of running hostels during the pandemic and would follow all Covid-19 standards on campus. Currently, more than 32 lakh students study in private schools in the state, of which about 40 percent are enrolled in boarding schools.
Quite a few of us (schools) have already opened hostels, the rest will reopen hostels from Monday. We have already challenged parents and many are willing to send their children to hostels


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2021 Grand County Voter’s Guide https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/2021-grand-county-voters-guide/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/2021-grand-county-voters-guide/#respond Sat, 16 Oct 2021 15:24:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/2021-grand-county-voters-guide/ Grand County voters will vote on a number of issues in November, from tax increases to school board memberships. The ballots were mailed last week and polling day is November 2. Drop boxes are located at the County Administrative Building in Hot Sulfur Springs, CSU Extension Office in Kremmling, Grand Lake Town Hall, Granby Town […]]]>

Grand County voters will vote on a number of issues in November, from tax increases to school board memberships. The ballots were mailed last week and polling day is November 2.

Drop boxes are located at the County Administrative Building in Hot Sulfur Springs, CSU Extension Office in Kremmling, Grand Lake Town Hall, Granby Town Hall and Grand Recreation Center Park in Fraser.

In-person voting will take place from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays from October 25 to November 1 on the top floor of the county administration building, as well as from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on October 1. November 30 and 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.



Ballots and election information are available at GrandVotes.org.

COUNTY PROBLEMS

Ballot paper number 1A



Grand County Emergency Medical Services are asking for a $ 1.75 thousandth tax increase, providing the department about $ 1.65 million more per year to maintain their standard of care.

If passed, it would be the first increase in EMS’s factory tax since the tax was established in 2003. The increase would cost residential property owners an additional $ 12.51 per year per year. $ 100,000 of property value.

The funds are intended to meet the growing needs of Grand County with an additional ambulance, six more full-time staff, a salary increase for existing employees and the repair or replacement of two aging EMS stations in Granby and Fraser. .

To learn more about EMS ‘proposal and plans for the funds, visit http://www.co.grand.co.us/167/Emergency-Medical-Services.

Voting questions 1B to 1G

These voting questions ask Grand County voters whether they want to restore term limits for six of the elected offices at the county government level.

Currently, only Grand County Commissioners are limited to three four-year terms. The Clerk and Recorder, Treasurer, Assessor, Sheriff, Surveyor and Coroner are to be re-elected every four years, but currently face no term limits.

With this measure, for all terms that voters decide to limit to term, individuals would be limited to three terms of four years from January 1. The measure would not be retroactive, so current serving officials could still serve three more terms after their current term.

By law, these elected officials are independent of each other and of the departmental commissioners. Their powers and duties are defined by the state constitution, and in Grand County officials tend to stay in these roles for a period of time.

County Surveyor Warren Ward and Clerk Sara Rosene have been in their posts for almost 30 years, while Assessor Tom Weydert and Coroner Brenda Bock have been in their posts for almost 15 years.

The newly elected Grand County, in addition to the commissioners, are Sheriff Brett Schroetlin, who began his term in 2015, and Treasurer Frank DeLay, who was elected last November.

EAST SCHOOL DISTRICT

School district offices

Three East Grand Board of Education positions are up for election in November. However, only one office will be competitive. Each position is for four years.

District 3 director will see Ed Raegner versus Deborah Relyea. Raegner was previously the chairman of the East Grand School Board, but had to resign after finding out his house was located just outside the principal’s district.

The incumbent Chris Raines was the only head of district principal 2 to run this year, while no one showed up for district head 6. The school board will appoint someone to the District 6 office after the election, a once he has found a candidate for the post.

Ballot paper number 4A

The East Grand School District wants voter approval to invest $ 85 million in capital improvements, including the construction of a new elementary school in Granby.

To fund the obligation, district taxes will increase to $ 7.1 million per year for the next 20 years. This means that an individual owner would pay $ 44.48 more in taxes per year for every $ 100,000 of value.

The bond money would be spent on the capital projects outlined in the poll question, including the acquisition of land and a new elementary school in Granby with potential for future growth. East Grand Superintendent Frank Reeves previously said the Granby Elementary School has reached its maximum capacity and has no room for additional classes.

The bond would not only finance the new primary school. The money would also be used for upgrades to safety, security and U.S. Disability Act compliant upgrades, physical upgrades and renovations at the other three schools, a facility for a new curriculum professional and technical skills, and a space for student mental health counseling and school nursing services.

GRAND WEST SCHOOL DISTRICT

School district offices

The West Grand School Board has nine candidates vying for five positions, each with a four-year term. Past President Shawn Lechman, Past Vice President Mitch Lockhart and Past Member Gordon Stuart Heller introduced themselves with H. Lee Bruchez, Brad Probst, Ralph Graves, Jackie Roppel, Wes Howell and Bryan Klotz.

Ballot paper number 5A

This election measure would raise West Grand’s taxes by $ 4.525 thousand, raising an additional $ 550,000 for the district, which would be used for infrastructure and salaries.

If passed, Measure 5A would increase annual taxes on private property by $ 100,000 from $ 32.35 per year. The school board would then decide how to allocate funds to meet both deferred maintenance and salary needs.

The district did not specify how the funds would be split between staff compensation and capital needs, but the superintendent warned that the district will have to make tough decisions without additional funds.

GREAT FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT N ° 1

Ballot paper number 6A

The Greater Fire Protection District, faced with increasing calls and struggling revenues, is also asking for a factory tax increase. The 152 square mile district serves Granby and the surrounding area.

By combining the current district mills and bond debt, Fire District taxpayers are currently paying 8.25 miles on their property to the Fire District. The 3.8 mill bond debt ends in 2025, so Grand Fire is asking to increase to 10 mill total for the district.

If passed, Ballot 6A would put bond debt into the department’s operating budget instead of letting it expire, while giving the district an additional income of $ 1.75 million.

The additional cost for residential property would be $ 12.19 per $ 100,000. This would raise an additional $ 341,000 for Grand Fire each year, which would be used for capital improvements, fire prevention and personnel costs.


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The 3 statewide questions on the 2021 poll, explained https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/the-3-statewide-questions-on-the-2021-poll-explained/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/the-3-statewide-questions-on-the-2021-poll-explained/#respond Fri, 15 Oct 2021 01:02:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/the-3-statewide-questions-on-the-2021-poll-explained/ Voters in Routt County will be asked to consider three statewide questions on their ballots for the Nov. 2 election. The Colorado Constitution requires changes in an out-of-year election to relate to tax matters like taxes or spending. One of the three issues is a constitutional amendment, which will require 55% of the vote to […]]]>

Voters in Routt County will be asked to consider three statewide questions on their ballots for the Nov. 2 election.

The Colorado Constitution requires changes in an out-of-year election to relate to tax matters like taxes or spending.

One of the three issues is a constitutional amendment, which will require 55% of the vote to pass, and the other two would amend the state’s statutes, requiring a simple majority to pass.



Amendment 78: Legislative power to spend state money

Colorado spending is typically approved by the legislature each year when it approves the state budget, but not everything is specifically allocated by the General Assembly.

The sums held are dollars that go directly to state agencies to decide how to spend them, without the legislator having to weigh it. The nationwide settlement money with Purdue Pharma owed in Colorado is an example of custody money distributed by the state attorney general’s office.



Constitutional Amendment 78 would end this practice, prohibiting state agencies from spending custody money without a specific allocation from the legislature. Instead, that money would go into a newly created fund, with interest from the fund going to the general state fund. Agencies can currently spend all interest accrued on money held.

The legislature would then be required to allocate the expenses of this new fund, but only after having held a public hearing.

In 2020, Governor Jared Polis spent $ 1.67 billion in CARES law money that the state received through an executive order. If amendment 78 were approved, a simple expenditure decree would no longer be authorized.

An independent commission is currently allocating transport funding, but if this measure were adopted, it would be in the hands of the legislator. The same goes for federal government grants and gifts or donations to organizations, colleges or universities.

Agencies would have to submit proposed spending of that money to the legislature for approval, which would require more budget staff for each, costing the state about $ 1 million each year.

“It will give power back to the people through the legislature,” said Pete Wood, Republican chairman of Routt County, who supports the measure. “Right now there is money flowing into the governor’s office that he can currently spend as he sees fit, and it undermines the integrity of our government.”

Opponents say this will add more costly bureaucracy to state government and could have significant unintended consequences, as the legislature only meets five months a year. The longer expenditure approval process could delay state spending, including in emergencies like wildfires.

“Some areas of government agencies are very apolitical, they are very technology-based, and you want them to focus on their technological expertise, not constantly reminding their legislature to make a decision,” said Catherine Carson, county chairperson. by Routt. Democrats, who oppose the measure. “If we got federal funds for wildfires, should we call a special session to help our communities?” It doesn’t seem very effective.

Proposition 119: Program for the enrichment of learning and academic progress

If approved, Proposal 119 would create the Learning Enrichment and Academic Advancement Program, which would provide financial assistance to eligible students for extracurricular enrichment such as tutoring.

The measure would be funded largely by an increase in the sales tax on recreational marijuana sales from the current 15% to 18% next year, 19% in 2024 and 20% for each year. next.

It would also create a new state agency to control that money, independent of both the State Board of Education and the Colorado Department of Education, governed by a board of directors appointed by the governor.

To fund this new agency, money would also have to be transferred from the State Land Trust Fund to the State Public School Fund, and then the corresponding money – about $ 22 million per year – from the general fund would go to the new agency.

Carson and Wood have both said they oppose the measure.

Carson said she opposes it because it is diverting money from the Land Trust, which goes to fund general schools, public schools for the benefit of private entities and because it adds more bureaucracy to the funding. schools.

Wood said at first glance that the measure had good intentions, but he doesn’t like the way the new agency spending the money is structured, which he says could lead to corruption. He was also concerned that an increase in the tax on marijuana sales would further incentivize the sale of weed on the black market.

Members of the Steamboat Springs School District School Board said they opposed the move, according to the Colorado School Boards Association.

“It’s one of those things that looks great in theory,” Chairman of the Board Kelly Latterman said on Monday. “The marijuana money is currently allocated to the BEST fundraising program, and (the school boards association) says there would likely be money taken out of it.”

BEST funding has had clear impacts in Routt County, including being the primary source of funding for the construction of the one-year-old Hayden Valley Schools Building.

“The other point is that this may be the start of school voucher initiatives, which would certainly take money away from public education,” said Lara Craig, board member.

Proposition 120: Reduction of the property tax assessment rate

The third measure on the ballot may have a different impact than when it was originally put on the ballot earlier this year due to Senate Bill 21-293 which went into effect in June.

Proposition 120 would have initially lowered property tax rates for all residential and most non-residential properties, but the June legislation created various categories of properties. This bill also temporarily lowered property tax assessment rates for residential, agricultural and renewable energy properties, dropping it to 6.8% for 2022 and 2023.

For this reason, the proposal would reduce residential property tax assessments on multi-family dwellings – duplexes, triplexes or those with four or more units but not including condos – to 6.5%, from 7.15% in 2021. Non-residential rates would drop from 29% to 26.4%, but this would only affect accommodation properties like hotels and motels.

Single-family homes, farmland, mines, and oil and gas properties would not be affected.

This would reduce the amount of property taxes collected by Colorado local governments by $ 45.9 million in 2022 and $ 50.3 million in 2023. Subsequent years are expected to see larger declines due to an expected increase. property taxes on multi-family homes.

Prior to Senate legislation, the measure was expected to reduce property tax revenues by about $ 1 billion – money that goes largely to counties, school districts, fire districts, libraries, and government districts. water and sewer and other county-level services.

School districts would not necessarily be the losers because the state is required to make up the difference between the funding described in state law and what is collected by taxes, although the legislature ultimately decides the funding levels of the schools. schools. If there was a decrease in funding for schools, it would vary by district.

The impacts will vary from county to county, with Routt County experiencing more revenue losses than others because it has a higher concentration of multi-family homes.

Analysis by the non-partisan, business-focused Common Sense Institute shows that if 120 were approved and SB 21-293 upheld by the courts, Routt County would lose an estimated $ 2.2 million in 2024 If 120 is approved and the courts overturn the law and the measure is enacted as originally written, Routt County could lose up to $ 7.4 million in 2024.

Supporters say the measure will reduce the tax burden on many rented units, easing pressure on tenants and prompting investment in more housing amid a local and statewide housing shortage. It could also free up money for hotels to hire more staff or cut rates, further boosting tourism.

Wood said he supports the measure because it will lower taxes for some, especially as inflation outside the pandemic increases costs. He also wasn’t worried about the county’s declining revenue, pointing to increased revenue and pandemic aid that the county decides how to spend.

“Giving people who have multi-family homes is going to give them some relief, and that’s always a good thing,” said Wood. “The more money they have in their pocket, the more they will spend or invest in other things, which is good for our economy.”

Carson said she opposed the measure because while the measure may provide short-term relief to people whose property tax values ​​have increased, the Taxpayers Bill of Rights (TABOR) means the only way raising these taxes in the future would be another ballot measure. SB 21-293 is already providing the immediate relief needed, she said.

“They’ve reduced the factory tax to a statutory level, and that way they can fix it as the economy changes,” Carson said. “The challenge of doing it by ballot is that it’s permanent. … (The legislature) must be able to react to changing economies and changing situations.


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Archdiocese of Philadelphia and Rosemont College announce innovative partnership https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/archdiocese-of-philadelphia-and-rosemont-college-announce-innovative-partnership/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/archdiocese-of-philadelphia-and-rosemont-college-announce-innovative-partnership/#respond Wed, 13 Oct 2021 14:47:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/archdiocese-of-philadelphia-and-rosemont-college-announce-innovative-partnership/ Rosemont will offer a 50% discount on tuition fees to high school graduates from the Archdiocese ROSEMONT, Pa., October 13, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – The Archdiocese of Philadelphia and Rosemont College today announced a new partnership that will provide a clear and affordable path for high school students to pursue their Catholic education at the […]]]>

Rosemont will offer a 50% discount on tuition fees to high school graduates from the Archdiocese

ROSEMONT, Pa., October 13, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – The Archdiocese of Philadelphia and Rosemont College today announced a new partnership that will provide a clear and affordable path for high school students to pursue their Catholic education at the college level.

Beginning in the 2021-2022 school year, Rosemont College will offer a tuition grant of $ 9,750 to students graduating from Catholic high schools in the Archdiocese and committing to attend Rosemont as residential students. The grant is 50% off standard Rosemont tuition fees and reduces annual tuition fees to less than $ 10,000 per year. In addition, students will remain eligible for merit scholarships.

“We are delighted to offer this opportunity to students who are already engaged in a rewarding Catholic education and who wish to remain in a Catholic academic environment for their graduate studies,” said Jayson Boyers, Ed.D., President of Rosemont College. “While we hope this grant helps to continue a Catholic education, we understand that fit into college is far more than the cost. “

Sister Maureen Lawrence McDermott, IHM, Ph.D. The Director of Studies and Superintendent of High Schools of the Office of Catholic Education of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia said: “The partnership between the high schools of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia and Rosemont College offers our students a wonderful opportunity to continue their educational journey in a Catholic environment. The sister continued, “I look forward to the success of this initiative and the fruits it will bear for our young adults. “

Irene Horstmann Hannan, Executive Director of Faith in the Future, said: “Partnering with Rosemont College to provide dedicated scholarship funds to graduates of Archdiocesan high schools is one of the great opportunities. Hannan continued: “I look forward to a fruitful partnership with one of the most reputable Catholic higher education institutions in the region. “

“We believe Catholic high school graduates will find their unique place within Rosemont’s small, intentionally diverse faith community,” Boyers said. “This scholarship aims to give Catholic high school graduates the opportunity to graduate with very little or almost no debt to graduate.”

Char Hoppel, a freshman from Rosemont, is one of the many students who come to Rosemont from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. Hoppel, who attended Archbishop Ryan High School, was awarded the Cornelian Scholarship for his extensive service work. She plans to major in political science at Rosemont and aspires to work in local politics or in the private sector as a policy analyst.

“Coming from an Archdiocesan high school, I’m so glad I made the decision to come to Rosemont,” said Hoppel. “In high school, I really appreciated the mentorship I received from my teachers and the opportunity to explore a subject in depth in class. I wanted a similar experience in college and found this and more in Rosemont. We are a small community where I get to know everyone in my residence and have been able to get involved in many organizations on campus. I am convinced that other students from the Archdiocese would find their place here in Rosemont, just like me.

About Rosemont College

With an 11: 1 student-teacher ratio, students receive special attention in their lessons throughout their stay at Rosemont. They can choose one of 27 undergraduate majors or create their own through individualized study. A Division III school, Rosemont also offers 15 sports and more than 20 clubs and organizations on campus.

Founded in 1921 by the Société du Saint-Enfant-Jésus, Collège Rosemont is a private co-educational establishment rooted in Catholicism and welcoming people of all faiths. Rosemont provides a comprehensive education through small group and experiential learning experiences while providing campus-wide academic, spiritual and professional support. The College respects and embraces diversity and individuality and promotes student success throughout their lives. For more information, visit www.rosemont.edu.

About Catholic Schools in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia

For more information on Catholic schools in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, please visit https://aopcatholicschools.org/. For more information on the Faith in the Future Foundation, please visit https://www.faithinthefuture.com/.

Contacts: Kenneth A. Gavin
Head of communications
Archdiocese of Philadelphia
kgavin@archphila.org

Annie speer
annie.speer@buchananpr.com


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Brick, NJ man charged with murder for account in the brutal death of his father https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/brick-nj-man-charged-with-murder-for-account-in-the-brutal-death-of-his-father/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/brick-nj-man-charged-with-murder-for-account-in-the-brutal-death-of-his-father/#respond Mon, 11 Oct 2021 20:27:10 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/brick-nj-man-charged-with-murder-for-account-in-the-brutal-death-of-his-father/ TOMS RIVER – Prosecutors say a new for-hire murder charge against a New Jersey man in his father’s death two years ago could result in a life sentence without the possibility of parole. Mark Austin and a co-accused were originally charged with murder, conspiracy and weapons counts in the death of Austin’s father, Mark, 55, […]]]>

TOMS RIVER – Prosecutors say a new for-hire murder charge against a New Jersey man in his father’s death two years ago could result in a life sentence without the possibility of parole.

Mark Austin and a co-accused were originally charged with murder, conspiracy and weapons counts in the death of Austin’s father, Mark, 55, who was found beaten to death at his home in Brick Township in September 2019.

Ocean County prosecutors on Friday announced a replacement indictment against Austin, 30, alleging he had the murder committed with payment or a promise to pay.

Prosecutors said this aggravating factor, if proven, would require the imposition of a life sentence without parole.

When the initial charges were laid, “it was not known at the time that this was a vicarious murder situation,” prosecutors said.

Austin co-accused Jeray Melton, 30, of Salem City, pleaded guilty in February 2020 to aggravated manslaughter and is awaiting conviction, prosecutors said.

Melton initially alleged that Austin, his former cellmate at a juvenile correctional facility, threatened to kill him if he did not kill the victim, but he changed his story several times, according to The Asbury Park Press.

Melton told the judge during his plea hearing that Austin offered him $ 50,000 for the murder, Austin defense attorneys Robert De Groot and Oleg Nekretin told the newspaper.

When asked why he changed his story multiple times, Melton told investigators he was scared and had “mental health issues,” according to a transcript of a statement he made. made to detectives in February, the newspaper reported.

Melton told the court the dispute involved a debt between $ 5,000 and $ 8,000 owed by Austin to his father, the newspaper reported.

Austin defense attorneys in October 2019 accused authorities of a “campaign of coercion and trickery to obtain false confessions and a false statement” from Melton.

(Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

25 real crime scenes: what do they look like today?

Below, find out where 25 of history’s most infamous crimes took place – and what the locations are for today. (If they remained standing.)

WATCH: Here are the pets banned in every state

Because the regulation of exotic animals is left to the states, some organizations, including the Humane Society of the United States, are advocating for standardized federal legislation that would ban the possession of large cats, bears, primates, and large snakes. poisonous as pets.

Read on to see which animals are banned in your home country, as well as across the country.

The best outdoor beer gardens at breweries in NJ

There are more options than ever to enjoy Garden State craft beer in an outdoor setting.

New Jersey is tied for first place (with Kentucky) with 43% growth in the craft beer scene from 2015 to 2019, according to C + R Research.

What follows is a roundup of the state’s breweries with quaint, dedicated outdoor seating if the weather permits.


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$ 425 million ‘The Fountains’ development in eastern New York City completed with 1,163 affordable housing units https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/425-million-the-fountains-development-in-eastern-new-york-city-completed-with-1163-affordable-housing-units/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/425-million-the-fountains-development-in-eastern-new-york-city-completed-with-1163-affordable-housing-units/#respond Sun, 10 Oct 2021 14:44:48 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/425-million-the-fountains-development-in-eastern-new-york-city-completed-with-1163-affordable-housing-units/ The Fountains, a major $ 425 million transformation project at the former Brooklyn Developmental Center site in eastern New York, has been completed. This redevelopment of a six-acre complex includes 1,163 affordable housing units spread over several buildings, nearly 22,000 square feet of retail space and a new public plaza. 192 apartments are reserved for […]]]>

The Fountains, a major $ 425 million transformation project at the former Brooklyn Developmental Center site in eastern New York, has been completed. This redevelopment of a six-acre complex includes 1,163 affordable housing units spread over several buildings, nearly 22,000 square feet of retail space and a new public plaza. 192 apartments are reserved for assisted living homes for adults with intellectual or developmental disabilities.

“The Fountains embody our commitment to providing equal opportunity for every New Yorker, and this resort goes above and beyond to provide quality, affordability, and access to the resources necessary to lead healthy and successful lives.” Governor Hochul said. “This mixed-use development provides housing, services and amenities that will revitalize the community and build a better future for everyone, but especially for our most vulnerable residents.”

Originally opened in 1973 as a residential care and treatment center for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, the 35-acre Brooklyn Developmental Center was closed in 2015 due to a change in national policy for the housing to integrated supportive housing.

The decommissioned state property, purchased through Empire State Development’s competitive RFP process, was developed by the Arker Companies. The Arker Companies paid $ 10 million for the property, which previously belonged to the New York State Dormitory Authority.

Built in several phases, The Fountains complex comprises 1,163 apartments in six residential buildings. Most apartments are affordable for households earning at least 60% of the region’s median income, with 85 units for households earning up to 100% of the MAI. There are 200 apartments for adults 62 or older.

192 homes throughout the complex are reserved for adults with intellectual or developmental disabilities who will have access to on-site support services provided by the Block Institute. Funding for housing services and supports is provided by the New York State Office for People with Developmental Disabilities. In addition, OPWDD will rent office space on the complex.

The complex also includes Schroeder’s Walk, a new one-acre public plaza that extends Schroeder Avenue for pedestrians. The fountains also have 21,700 square feet of new retail space on the ground floor and off-street parking.

The six completed buildings include:

  • A six-story building at 11629 Seaview Avenue with 65 affordable apartments. 17 units are reserved for adults with intellectual or developmental disabilities. 10 apartments are fully accessible and adaptable to residents with reduced mobility, hearing or visual impairments.
  • A nine story building at 911 Erskine Street with 267 affordable apartments. 67 apartments are reserved for adults with intellectual or developmental disabilities.
  • A seven-story building at 10 Schroeder’s Walk with 200 apartments for residents 62 and over and 11,100 square feet of retail space on the ground floor. 60 of the apartments are reserved for homeless seniors.
  • A nine-story building at 702 avenue Vandalia, with 65 affordable apartments. 13 homes are reserved for adults with intellectual or developmental disabilities. 10 apartments are fully accessible and adaptable to residents with reduced mobility, hearing or visual impairments.
  • A nine story building at 881 Erksine Street with 144 affordable apartments. Twenty-nine homes are reserved for adults with intellectual or developmental disabilities. The main floor has 10,600 square feet of retail space.
  • A nine story building at 894 Fountain Avenue with 422 affordable apartments. There are 85 apartments for households earning up to 100 percent of the MAI. Sixty-six homes are reserved for adults with intellectual or developmental disabilities.

All six buildings were constructed to meet Enterprise Green Community standards and include energy efficient features such as ENERGY STAR labeled appliances, heating and cooling systems, and lighting.

The fountains are located near public transportation, Shirley Chisholm State Park, bike paths, and community resources such as grocery stores, parks, schools, and other retail establishments.

State funding for The Fountains includes more than $ 216 million in resources from New York State Homes and Community Renewal. Additional support was provided by the OPWDD, the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, and the New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development.

The fountains complement the state’s $ 1.4 billion Vital Brooklyn initiative that targets and invests in eight integrated areas, from health care to housing, setting a new standard for addressing chronic economic and racial disparities in communities. Brooklyn’s poorest communities. The Vital Brooklyn initiative will create 4,000 affordable housing units in downtown Brooklyn neighborhoods. Since 2011, New York State Homes and Community Renewal has invested nearly $ 2.5 billion in Brooklyn, creating or preserving nearly 12,000 affordable homes.

Senator Roxanne J. Persaud said: “With nearly a third of these 1,163 new homes reserved for adults aged 62 and over (200 units) and adults living with intellectual or developmental disabilities (192 units), this project is very responsive to the crying local need for permanent, safe and affordable housing. housing, especially for vulnerable New Yorkers. I’m proud to be here with this great group of public-private partners and look forward to working with you to bring more affordable housing to the 19th Senate District.

Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams said: “The development of Fountains will provide stable and very affordable housing to those who need it most. I was proud to support this project as Borough President, emphasizing the need to prioritize people at risk of displacement in the East New York and Brownsville areas. Providing on-site support services to residents with intellectual and developmental disabilities is also an important step in providing people with disabilities with stable and nurturing environments, and I urge other developments to follow this model to ensure that we are meeting the needs of people with disabilities. this vulnerable population. I would like to thank our city and state partners for making this necessary project a reality.

Alex Arker, Director of The Arker Companies, said: “This is an incredible time for our affordable housing community. We are proud to work alongside our partners, ESD, UNHCR and HPD, to open the fountains and provide a safe and stable home for thousands of New Yorkers. Les Fontaines revitalized this site with nearly 1,200 apartments, support services, a public square and more. As we continue to try to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic, it is an honor to do our part to help New Yorkers who need it most. “

Subscribe to East New York News for updates on housing, development, politics, health, events and more.


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The gifted and talented programs helped me, de Blasio took away my hope https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/the-gifted-and-talented-programs-helped-me-de-blasio-took-away-my-hope/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/the-gifted-and-talented-programs-helped-me-de-blasio-took-away-my-hope/#respond Sat, 09 Oct 2021 01:11:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/the-gifted-and-talented-programs-helped-me-de-blasio-took-away-my-hope/ Mediocrity has been the hallmark of Mayor Bill de Blasio’s nearly eight-year tenure at City Hall and he is leaving that mark on the city’s public school system. With 85 days remaining in office, he announced he is phasing out the Gifted and Talented program from the city. My brothers and I are products of […]]]>

Mediocrity has been the hallmark of Mayor Bill de Blasio’s nearly eight-year tenure at City Hall and he is leaving that mark on the city’s public school system. With 85 days remaining in office, he announced he is phasing out the Gifted and Talented program from the city.

My brothers and I are products of the gifted and talented programs of the public school system (ridiculously called “intellectually gifted children” at the time) and I have a science degree from the Bronx. An older cousin dated Stuyvesant in the 1970s, when he opened up to more participation from minority students. Her son is a graduate of both Bronx Science and Carnegie-Mellon. We all grew up in the South Bronx.

Accelerated learning programs with like-minded and capable classmates provided the academic stimulus, challenge and competition that made us better students.

So when it comes to these programs like ladders for kids who would otherwise be bored in regular classrooms, I’m a fierce advocate.

Since de Blasio couldn’t kill special high schools for entrance exams (hypocritical since First Son Dante is a Brooklyn Tech graduate), he is eliminating the foster school system.

De Blasio said the program was only for a select few and was not as inclusive.
Robert miller

Since his entry into town hall, the mayor has waged a merciless war against excellence. From targeting elite public high schools for elimination to blocking the expansion of successful charter schools to cutting gifted and talented programs across town, he has been on the warpath.

He chose to burn the only attractive academic program keeping many families in the city’s public schools. Private, parochial, and charter schools – as well as programs like Prep for Prep and A Better Chance, which recruit the brightest minority children to attend elite private schools – will be the beneficiaries of his myopia.

My former Assembly colleague, Jeffrey Dinowitz, understood correctly when he told me that all children deserve to have their specific needs taken into account. “Eliminating gifted and talented programs will mean that many children will be left behind. “

De Blasio dropped his explosive announcement without having serious discussions with stakeholder parent groups, elected officials or alumni of the city’s G&T programs. With this action, he created programs popular with immigrant families who see quality educational experiences as the key to future success.

Bronx High School of Science
Author Michael Benjamin and members of his family are products of New York schools like Bronx Science (above).
Robert miller

Did G&T need reform? Yes. But he threw the baby out with the bathwater.
Testing 4-year-old toddlers into accelerated learning classes was always the wrong way to go. It was too easy for the wealthiest families to play and it led to demographic and residential distortions.

The replacement program titled Brilliant NYC (what’s new with de Blasio adding “NYC” to every wacky program) promises to provide accelerated learning for students ages 8 and up. Instead of being in separate classes, children will be offered advanced work tailored to their interests while being integrated.

Brilliant NYC doesn’t even claim to offer advanced education because that wouldn’t be egalitarian. The new approach promises to go beyond traditionally difficult subjects like math and science to include coding, robotics and community advocacy.

Jeffrey Dinowitz had talked about getting rid of the gifted program in New York.
Jeffrey Dinowitz had talked about getting rid of the gifted program in New York.
William Farrington

So if your little Jamaal isn’t reading, writing, or maths well, don’t worry, he’s good at being an activist. He just canceled his teacher for giving him a B.

I’m still trying to figure out how accelerated math will be taught while the majority of the class is still trying to master the basic concepts.

Unfortunately, this 11th hour movement is not aimed at improving the quality of public education for those in underperforming community school districts. Like Thrive NYC, Brilliant NYC appears to be the exact opposite of what its noble moniker suggests.

Once again, the champion of mediocrity targets the fruits at hand and fails to solve an intractable systemic problem: poor performance in predominantly black and Hispanic public schools.

I think the real intention here is simple: Dumb everything down. Keep every child stuck in the mud. And with the dropping of academic metrics, like standardized testing, who will be the wiser.

A boy walks into Brooklyn PS 245 on Monday, September 13, 2021, in New York City.
Democrat Eric Adams and Republican Curtis Sliwa have said they don’t want to get rid of the G&T program.
Mark Lennihan / AP

The next administration will arrive on January 1 and will have to stem a mass exodus from a declining public school system that is sinking into greater mediocrity.

Black, Hispanic and Asian families like the one I grew up in deserve better. Rigorous and quality public education is the way to a better future for our children.

I pray that whoever follows in de Blasio’s wake will repair and replace our broken school system.

Michael Benjamin is a former member of the State Assembly and a member of the Post’s editorial board.


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The government publishes guidelines for the PM-CARES for Children program. Check eligibility and other details https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/the-government-publishes-guidelines-for-the-pm-cares-for-children-program-check-eligibility-and-other-details/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/the-government-publishes-guidelines-for-the-pm-cares-for-children-program-check-eligibility-and-other-details/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 08:55:40 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/the-government-publishes-guidelines-for-the-pm-cares-for-children-program-check-eligibility-and-other-details/ The Union government has issued guidelines for the PM-Cares for children program, which will provide full support to children who have lost their parents due to the Covid-19 pandemic. The scheme will provide a monthly allowance from the age of 18 and ??10 lakh at the age of 23. Eligible children must register from 29.05.2021 […]]]>

The Union government has issued guidelines for the PM-Cares for children program, which will provide full support to children who have lost their parents due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

The scheme will provide a monthly allowance from the age of 18 and ??10 lakh at the age of 23.

Eligible children must register from 29.05.2021 which is the date of the announcement by the Prime Minister on 31.12.2021 to benefit from PM-CARES benefits for children. The program is expected to continue until the year each identified beneficiary turns 23.

Eligibility criteria

The program eligibility criteria will cover all children who have lost both parents or a surviving parent or legal guardian / adoptive parents / single adoptive parent due to the Covid-19 pandemic, as of March 11, 2020, date to which the WHO has declared and characterized Covid-19 as a pandemic until December 2021, will be entitled to benefits under this plan.

In addition, the child must not have reached the age of 18 on the date of the parents’ death.

The rights under the plan include:

Support for boarding and accommodation:

– Efforts will be made by the district magistrate with the assistance of the Child Protection Committee (CWC) to explore the possibility of rehabilitating the child within his extended family or relatives

– If the extended family or relatives of the child are not available / do not wish / are not considered suitable by the CWC or the child (aged 4 to 10 years or more) does not wish to live with them , the child must be placed in foster care, after due diligence prescribed under the Juvenile Justice Act, 2015 and its rules, as amended from time to time.

– If the host family is not available / does not wish / is not deemed suitable by the CWC, or if the child (aged 4 to 10 years or more) does not wish to live with them, l Child 1 Beneficiary / Recipients refers to eligible child beneficiaries under the CARES for Children PM Program.

– Children over 10 years old, not received by extended families or relatives or foster families or not wishing to live with them or living in childcare institutions after the death of the parents, can be enrolled to Netaji Subhash Chand Bose Awasiya Vidyalaya, Kasturba Gandhi Balika Vidyalaya, Eklavya Model Schools, Sainik School, Navodaya Vidyalaya, or any other boarding school by the district magistrate, subject to the directions of the respective regime.

– We can make sure that the siblings stay together, as much as possible.

– For non-institutional care, financial assistance at the prevailing rates prescribed under the Child Protective Services (CPS) program must be provided to the children (on account with the guardian). For the child placed in an institution, a maintenance allowance at the rates in force prescribed under the program of child protection services (CPS) is granted to childcare institutions. Any subsistence allowance under the public scheme may also be provided in addition to children.

Preschool and school education assistance

For children under the age of 6, the identified beneficiaries will receive support and assistance from Anganwadi services for supplementary nutrition, preschool education / ECCE, vaccination, health referrals and health check-up.

For children under 10 years old

– Admission must be provided to any nearest school as an external, i.e. government-sponsored or government-sponsored school or private schools

– In public schools, two sets of uniforms and free textbooks will be provided, under Samagra Shiksha Abhiyan, according to program guidelines.

– In private schools, tuition fees are exempt under article 12 (1) (c) of the RTE law.

– In cases where the child cannot benefit from the above services, the costs, according to RTE standards, will be covered by the PM CARES for Children system.

The program will also cover the cost of uniforms, textbooks and notebooks.

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Nearly 300 new affordable housing units in Truckee-Tahoe https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/nearly-300-new-affordable-housing-units-in-truckee-tahoe/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/nearly-300-new-affordable-housing-units-in-truckee-tahoe/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 00:25:32 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/nearly-300-new-affordable-housing-units-in-truckee-tahoe/ RENO, Nevada (AP) – The recent opening of five new residential developments has added nearly 300 affordable housing units for workers in Truckee, Calif. And on the north shore of Lake Tahoe, an area where such housing has been in high demand these last years. . The projects are the result of public-private partnerships that […]]]>

RENO, Nevada (AP) – The recent opening of five new residential developments has added nearly 300 affordable housing units for workers in Truckee, Calif. And on the north shore of Lake Tahoe, an area where such housing has been in high demand these last years. .

The projects are the result of public-private partnerships that injected around $ 150 million into the local economy during their development, the Reno Gazette Journal reported.

Many units are reserved for households earning less than 50% of the region’s median income, and most are capped at 80%.

California State Treasurer Fiona Ma said at a groundbreaking ceremony on Oct. 1 that she would increase the mix of regional housing while providing “critical relief” to families, workers and artists low or moderate income that form the backbone of high cost California communities.

“Developments like these help ensure our children have opportunities to stay in the communities they love,” said District 5 supervisor Cindy Gustafson.


They include the Truckee Artist Lofts, 77 mixed-use units at Truckee Railyard for local artists and workers. Many are limited to households earning 80% of the region’s median income, with about a quarter limited to less than 50%.

The 48 Coldstream Commons units near Donner State Memorial Park limit income to 60% of the median.


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