native american – World Socialist CWI http://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ Wed, 13 Apr 2022 11:19:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4-150x150.png native american – World Socialist CWI http://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ 32 32 Editorial Summary: Michigan | Michigan News https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/editorial-summary-michigan-michigan-news/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 18:03:59 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/editorial-summary-michigan-michigan-news/ Iron Mountain Daily News. March 4, 2022. Editorial: Michigan to Salute Service, Donating with Governor’s Awards The Michigan Community Service Commission encourages Michiganders to nominate friends, family and peers who have made a difference for others for the 2022 Governor’s Service Awards. This annual event recognizes contributions made through volunteerism, service and philanthropy. It has […]]]>

Iron Mountain Daily News. March 4, 2022.

Editorial: Michigan to Salute Service, Donating with Governor’s Awards

The Michigan Community Service Commission encourages Michiganders to nominate friends, family and peers who have made a difference for others for the 2022 Governor’s Service Awards.

This annual event recognizes contributions made through volunteerism, service and philanthropy. It has been hosted by the Governor of Michigan for nearly 30 years to recognize the commitment of Michigan residents, organizations and businesses to improving the lives of people and communities.

political cartoons

Several nomination categories are available for volunteer and philanthropic efforts that have taken place over the past year, including honors for youth, mentors and older adults.

Organizations will be recognized for their civic engagement and businesses for maximizing the collective impact of employee volunteerism and corporate social responsibility programs.

Special awards will also be given for lifetime service and giving achievements.

Applications must be submitted by April 30. Nomination instructions are available at https://www.research.net/r/2022MIServiceAwards.

A hard copy of a nomination form is also available upon request. Contact the Michigan Community Service Commission at 517-335-4295 or gsa@michigan.gov.

“Michigan has a long tradition of serving and helping others,” said Ginna Holmes, executive director of MCSC. “The Governor’s Service Awards are a great opportunity for us to come together and celebrate those who have truly made a difference.

The nomination should tell the story of why the nominee deserves to be honored as one of Michigan’s outstanding individuals or organizations committed to making a difference. When creating the application, it is important to provide as much relevant information about the candidate as possible.

Self-nominations for individual categories are not permitted, but may be made for organization awards.

“I want to encourage every Michigander to consider nominating someone for the 2022 Governor’s Service Awards,” Governor Gretchen Whitmer said. “Although the past few years have been difficult, many Michiganians have responded with the courage and determination that define our state. Michiganders from all corners of our state have stepped up and worked hard to support their communities and help their neighbors.

During the pandemic, MCSC is mobilizing more than $21 million in federal funds for local communities for volunteer programs and activities. For more information, go to www.michigan.gov/volunteer.

Traverse City Record-Eagle. March 2, 2022.

Editorial: Supporting the Study of Indigenous-Run Residential Schools

The harrowing discovery last year of hundreds of unmarked graves at several Indian residential school sites in Canada has rightly set the wheels in motion – wheels already rusty from neglect.

Immediately after, promises to do better were made by governments, especially in states with their own government-sanctioned boarding school horrors.

Michigan is home to three such sites: the Mount Pleasant Indian Industrial Boarding School; the Holy Childhood boarding school in Harbor Springs; and the Holy Name of Jesus Indian Mission in Baraga.

Governor Gretchen Whitmer’s proposed budget for 2023 echoes that promise with a one-time $500,000 appropriation to study “the number of children who have been abused, died or disappeared in these schools, and the long-term impacts term about these children and families. of children forced to attend these schools” and submit a report a year later. This goes hand in hand with federal efforts led by Deb Haaland, our nation’s first Native American cabinet member.

The problem is that in Michigan, several tribal leaders were not involved in these early stages, in the request, in defining its parameters or do not know what roles Michigan’s 12 federally recognized sovereign nations will have. in the process.

So while attention and budgeting are welcome, the state must watch for blind spots to ensure that the course is set – and not by well-meaning bureaucrats – by our Indigenous communities. The role of the state should be one of support, while providing the same concentrated force to open up church record keeping as it has done in the past to address clergy sex abuse. .

The study and resulting report will no doubt uncover some uncomfortable truths.

More than 7,000 other unmarked graves have been discovered at several Indian school sites in the United States and Canada. Beyond the horrific scale of these deaths is the quieter destruction of families, culture and language that still marks communities today – the legacy of these schools.

But we cannot move forward without a clear look behind us – a look without bureaucratic blind spots. Support Anishinaabek leadership by leading the way in our state’s drive to uncover what happened, why it happened, and how its impacts ripple through time and generations.

Escanaba Daily Press. March 7, 2022.

Editorial: March is Michigan Food and Agriculture Month

Governor Gretchen Whitmer proclaimed March Michigan Food and Agriculture Month, to honor and celebrate Michigan farmers, the diversity of produce grown and processed in our state, and the partnerships that keep our food industry thriving. and agricultural.

“Michigan’s food industry is a national powerhouse. We have generated 805,000 jobs and more than $104 billion for our state’s economy each year, making things happen every day,” Governor Whitmer said. “Food and agriculture innovators and entrepreneurs continue to choose Michigan to grow and establish their businesses. They provide new business and career opportunities for Michigan residents, making food and agriculture the cornerstone of Michigan’s continued reinvention. In March, we recognize every person and business that helps make Michigan’s food and agriculture industry what it is today.

Throughout Michigan Food and Agriculture Month, the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD) will be partnering and presenting various events with the University of State of Michigan commodity organizations, Michigan McDonald’s, the Michigan Department of Labor and Economic Opportunity and others to highlight different facets of the state’s food and agriculture sector and provide opportunities to learn more about how the food and agriculture industry impacts and improves the lives of Michigan residents.

“One of the best parts of my job is traveling around the state to meet the people who make Michigan’s agribusiness industry strong, prosperous and successful, and I look forward to continuing those visits in March. “said Gary McDowell, Director of MDARD. “Throughout March, you will see posts on our social media channels featuring Michigan cultures, food and agriculture businesses, and MDARD employees who help support and grow our industry. We’ll also highlight nutrition tips to celebrate National Nutrition Month, share information about National Weights and Measures Week, feature children’s books on food and farming for March is Reading Month and provide safety information to our farmers, businesses and constituents during Weather Preparedness Week. .”

Throughout the month: Agriculture and Natural Resources Week at Michigan State University, featuring virtual learning opportunities, events and activities for farmers and others interested in Michigan’s agriculture and natural resources.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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The tribe is grappling with a crisis over missing women along the California coast https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/the-tribe-is-grappling-with-a-crisis-over-missing-women-along-the-california-coast/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/the-tribe-is-grappling-with-a-crisis-over-missing-women-along-the-california-coast/ YUROK RESERVATION, Calif. – The young mother had behaved erratically for months, hitchhiking and wandering naked through two Native American reservations and a small town clustered along California’s rugged Lost Coast North. Next, Emmilee Risling was charged with arson for starting a fire in a cemetery. Her family hoped the case would force her to […]]]>

YUROK RESERVATION, Calif. – The young mother had behaved erratically for months, hitchhiking and wandering naked through two Native American reservations and a small town clustered along California’s rugged Lost Coast North.

Next, Emmilee Risling was charged with arson for starting a fire in a cemetery.

Her family hoped the case would force her to seek mental health and addiction services. Instead, she was released at the request of her relatives and a tribal police chief.

The 33-year-old college graduate – an accomplished traditional dancer with ancestry from three tribes – was last seen shortly after, walking across a bridge near a spot marked End of Road, a remote corner of the reservation of Yurok where the rutted sidewalk dissolves into the thick woods.

A photo of missing Emmilee Risling sits on a table in the Risling family home in McKinleyville, California.
Nathan Howard/AP

Her disappearance is one of five cases in 18 months in which Indigenous women have gone missing or been killed in this isolated stretch of Pacific coast between San Francisco and Oregon, an area where Yurok, Hupa, Karuk people , Tolowa and Wiyot have co-existed for millennia.

Two other women died from what authorities say were overdoses, although relatives have questions about the severe bruising they had.

The crisis prompted the Yurok Tribe to issue an emergency declaration and added urgency to efforts to create California’s first database of such cases and regain sovereignty over key services.

“I came to this question as a researcher and a learner, but in the last year I knew three of the women who disappeared or were murdered – and we have so much in common,” said Blythe George, a member of the Yurok tribe who consult on a project document the problem. “You can’t help but see yourself in these people.”

Yurok Tribal Police Chief Greg O'Rourke visits the last confirmed location where Emmilee Risling was seen before she disappeared last October in Klamath, California.

Yurok Tribal Police Chief Greg O’Rourke visits the last confirmed location where Emmilee Risling was seen before she disappeared last October in Klamath, California.
Nathan Howard/AP

The recent cases highlight an epidemic that is difficult to quantify but has long disproportionately plagued Native Americans.

A 2021 report by a congressional watchdog revealed that the true number of missing and murdered Indigenous women is unknown due to reporting issues, high levels of distrust of law enforcement, and jurisdictional disputes.

But Indigenous women face murder rates nearly three times higher than white women overall — and up to 10 times the national average in some places, a 2021 study finds. summary of existing research by the National Congress of American Indians. And more than 80% have suffered violence.

In this region dotted with illegal marijuana farms and defined by wilderness, almost everyone knows someone who has gone missing.

Posters of missing persons float on gas station doors and street signs. Even the chief of the tribal police is not spared: he took in the daughter of a missing woman, and Emmilee – a registered member of the Hoopa Valley tribe with Yurok and Karuk blood – took care of her children.

Yurok Tribal Police Chief Greg O'Rourke walks through the Yurok Reservation, returning to locations where Emmilee Risling was last seen.

Yurok Tribal Police Chief Greg O’Rourke walks through the Yurok Reservation, returning to locations where Emmilee Risling was last seen.
Nathan Howard/AP

In California alone, the Yurok Tribe and the Sovereign Bodies Institute, an Indigenous-led research and advocacy group, have uncovered 18 cases of Native American women missing or killed in the past year or so — a number that ‘they consider a vast undercount. An estimated 62% of those cases are not listed in state or federal missing persons databases.

Hupa citizen Brandice Davis went to school with the daughters of a woman who disappeared in 1991 and now has daughters of her own aged 9 and 13.

“Here we are all connected, in a way,” she said of a place where many families are tied together through marriage or community ties.

Davis warns her daughters about what it means to be female, Native American and growing up on a reservation: “You are a statistic. But we must continue. We have to show people that we are still here.

Maile Kane, 13 (left), and his sister Gracie Kane, 9, jump on a trampoline outside their home in Hoopa, California.  Their mother Brandice Davis grew up with one of the missing women, Emmilee Risling, and worries about the safety of her own daughters.

Maile Kane, 13 (left), and his sister Gracie Kane, 9, jump on a trampoline outside their home in Hoopa, California. Their mother Brandice Davis grew up with one of the missing women, Emmilee Risling, and worries about the safety of her own daughters.
Nathan Howard/AP

As often happens in cases involving Aboriginal women, Risling’s disappearance received little attention from the outside world.

But many here see in its story the horrifying intersection of generations of trauma inflicted on Native Americans by their white colonizers, the marginalization of Indigenous peoples, and the lack of authority of tribal law enforcement over many crimes committed on their land.

Virtually all of the area’s Indigenous residents, including Risling, have ancestors who were sent to residential schools as children and forced to abandon their language and culture as part of a federal assimilation campaign. .

Further back, the Yurok spent years away from home as indentured servants for the colonizers, according to Abby Abinanti, the tribe’s chief justice.

The trauma caused by these evictions resonates among the Yurok in the form of drug addiction and domestic violence, which trickles down to young people, Abinanti said. About 110 Yurok children are in foster care.

“You say, ‘OK, how did we get to this situation where we’re losing our children?’ ” she said. “There were big gaps in knowledge, including parenting, and these play out generationally.”

Abby Abinanti, Chief Judge of the Yurok Tribal Court.

Abby Abinanti, Chief Judge of the Yurok Tribal Court.
Nathan Howard/AP

An analysis of the cases by the Yurok and sovereign bodies revealed that most of the missing women in the region had themselves been placed in foster care or had children taken from them by the state.

An analysis of jail bookings also showed that citizens of Yurok in the two-county region are 11 times more likely to go to jail within a year – and half of those arrested are women, typically for low-level crimes. intensity. That’s an arrest rate for Yurok women about five times the national incarceration rate for women, according to George, University of California sociologist Merced consulting the tribe.

The Yurok run a Tribal Drug Welfare Court and operate one of the only programs in the country for state-certified tribal domestic violence perpetrators. They also recently hired a tribal prosecutor, another step toward building an indigenous justice system that would ultimately deal with all but the most serious crimes.

The Yuroks are also working to regain foster care supervision and hope to transfer their first foster home from state court within months, said Jessica Carter, director of the Yurok Tribal Court. A tribe-run guardianship court is following 50 other children who live with relatives.

The long-term plan – mostly funded by grants – is a massive undertaking that will take years to accomplish.

But the Yurok see regaining sovereignty over these systems as the only way to end the cycle of loss that has cost their women the most.

“If we’re successful, we can use this as a giveaway to other tribes to say, ‘Here are the steps we’ve taken,'” said Rosemary Deck, the new tribal prosecutor. “’You can take this as a plan and assert your own sovereignty.’ ”

Gary and Judy Risling, whose daughter Emmilee Risling, 33, a college graduate and accomplished traditional dancer from three tribes, disappeared more than four months ago while crossing a bridge near End of Road, a far corner of the Yurok reservation in northern California.  .

Gary and Judy Risling, whose daughter Emmilee Risling, 33, a college graduate and accomplished traditional dancer from three tribes, disappeared more than four months ago while crossing a bridge near End of Road, a far corner of the Yurok reservation in northern California. . They struggled to protect her children, now aged 10 and almost 2, from the trauma of their mother’s disappearance. “It’s really hard when you’re taking care of the grandkids, and the grandkid says, ‘Grandpa, can you take me down the river, and can we pick up my mum?’ said Gary Risling, choking back tears. “What do you say to him? “We search, we search every day. And then he says, “What if we can’t find her?”
Nathan Howard/AP

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MCSA President testifies before MN House Higher Education Committee https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/mcsa-president-testifies-before-mn-house-higher-education-committee/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 21:33:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/mcsa-president-testifies-before-mn-house-higher-education-committee/ Morris Campus Student Association President Dylan Young, 23, was one of three University of Minnesota student union representatives to appear before the House Finance and Higher Education Policy Committee on Wednesday 16 February. Appearing before the committee via Zoom, Young focused his comments on the impact of the Multiethnic Resource Center on him as a […]]]>

Morris Campus Student Association President Dylan Young, 23, was one of three University of Minnesota student union representatives to appear before the House Finance and Higher Education Policy Committee on Wednesday 16 February.

Appearing before the committee via Zoom, Young focused his comments on the impact of the Multiethnic Resource Center on him as a student.

Young shared that he was Lakota from the Rosebud Sioux tribe of Parmelee, South Dakota, and spent his freshman year at Morris trying to reconcile the campus’ history as an Indian boarding school with his current experience as a as a student.

“I would wonder why an institution that once did so much harm to communities like mine should be allowed to operate today, even if it is not in its current form. Why not bury the past and move on? I especially hated the Multi-Ethnic Resource Center (MRC), the only building left on campus from the boarding school days.

The MRC is the main hub for some of the departments and student organizations that impacted Young as a student of Morris, including the Native American Student Success Program and the Circle of Nations Indigenous Association (CNIA).

My peer mentorship and time as co-president of CNIA are two experiences that turned me into a leader and turned this lost, confused, angry kid from the reservation into student body president at Morris. I never thought something like this was possible. And all thanks to my experiences as a student at the Morris campus.

But Young noted that the MRC building is not accessible, which means “there is a very visible structural barrier that prevents our students from enjoying the cross-cultural competence that is essential to the Morris experience.”

Young concluded that the MRC “is symbolic of why maintaining and preserving our historic campus is so important. Morris’ past cannot be undone, but the present and our future are still being written and I am here today to ask for your help in writing this.

Video of the entire committee meeting can be viewed at https://www.house.leg.state.mn.us/hjvid/92/895347

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Inside the fight for banks to benefit their communities • Sacramento News & Review https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/inside-the-fight-for-banks-to-benefit-their-communities-sacramento-news-review/ Wed, 16 Feb 2022 16:53:06 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/inside-the-fight-for-banks-to-benefit-their-communities-sacramento-news-review/ As banks continue to merge, advocates are trying to ensure low-income communities won’t have to pay for it. By Robin Urevich, Capital & Main This story is produced by the award-winning journalism association Capital and main and co-published here with permission. At a time when big banks are easily getting approval for profitable mergers, some […]]]>

As banks continue to merge, advocates are trying to ensure low-income communities won’t have to pay for it.

By Robin Urevich, Capital & Main

This story is produced by the award-winning journalism association Capital and main and co-published here with permission.

At a time when big banks are easily getting approval for profitable mergers, some California community groups say it’s not so fast. Dozens of them seek to block US Bank’s bid to acquire Union Bank unless the former cancels $90 billion for charitable loans and donations to low-income areas of the state and communities of color.

the $8 billion mergerannounced Sept. 21, 2021, would create California fifth largest bank, a $680 billion mega-corporation that would compete with giants like Bank of America and JPMorgan Chase. How the Biden administration responds to the merger will be a test of whether the administration intends to consider bank consolidation rather than rubber-stamp it.

In July 2021 Executive Decree President Biden has called for a more critical approach to merger approvals, noting that “excessive consolidation increases costs for consumers, limits credit for small businesses and hurts low-income communities.”

The merger would be a victory for bank executives, but Paulina Gonzalez-Britothe executive director of the Oakland-based company California Reinvestment Coalition, made up of local housing advocates and nonprofit development groups, is leading the opposition to the acquisition. According to Gonzalez-Brito, low-income communities have a lot to lose from this deal.

So far, US Bank and Union Bank have each provided financing for affordable housing. Each lends to individuals and small businesses, donates to local charities and community lenders.

“Now the danger is that we will disappear. You end up with less than you started with and communities get less,” Gonzalez-Brito noted.

Much of the $90 billion package proposed by the CRC would go toward one of the state’s greatest needs: housing. The California Housing Partnership reports that 1.2 million low-income tenants lack safe and affordable housing.

The California Reinvestment Coalition is calling for public merger hearings to be held in Los Angeles, Fresno and San Francisco. Among CRC’s proposals: special programs to boost home ownership among African Americans and small Native American businesses. Additionally, they are asking for smaller-scale opportunities for tenants like Maria Montes de Oca to own and manage their own buildings.

* * *

In Oakland, just before Christmas 2021, Montes de Oca and a handful of neighbors were celebrating. Its landlord, who she said had doubled the rent for the past two years while refusing to eradicate mold or fix backed-up plumbing, had tentatively agreed to sell her building to the Oakland Community Land Trust.

“Now I can relax,” Montes de Oca said, as after a two-year rent strike, the land trust promises to keep the building affordable and make repairs, i.e. to say if the case passes.

Oakland Community Land Trust executive director Steve King said he expected to secure funding from the City of Oakland and nonprofit lenders to purchase the building from Montes de Oca.

CRC argues that the $90 billion benefits package would ensure low- and moderate-income communities of color get housing and small business financing opportunities and mitigate the potential damage of a consolidation.

But such agreements are not legally binding and enforcement can be difficult. “It’s usually a hard thing to do,” said Mike Calhoun, president of the Washington, DC-based Center for Responsible Lending. “They’ll say they’ll make X dollars in loans. It’s often unclear if that’s beyond what they’ve done. How do you count which loans qualify?”

In New York, Kathryn Franco, president of the Buffalo Niagara Reinvestment Coalitionsaid that to help enforce agreements, his group tries to make sure the public is part of the process by “being really transparent with the information that we have, [and] let community members know. ”

* * *

The American bank, for its part, argues that its acquisition of Union Bank is in itself a benefit to the communities where it operates, and promises in its October 2021 merger filing to provide affordable and increased financial access, to “address systemic racism” and to support “sustainable environmental practices”. It is also noted in the merger application that both banks passed their latest Community Reinvestment Act exams with an “Outstanding” rating.

Under the Community Reinvestment Act, which aims to eliminate lending discrimination by banks, regulators periodically review each bank’s lending and community investment record, assigning ratings ranging from unsatisfactory to outstanding. But grade inflation is rampant, Gonzalez-Brito said, with 96% of banks passing their exams.

Banks often agree to community benefit agreements in order to weed out opposition and grease the shoes for mergers to proceed. The CRC obtained 12 offers of this type by calling on regulators to deny bank mergers and acquisitions based on poor community reinvestment performance. But a $90 billion commitment from the U.S. bank would be the biggest in California yet.

Yet the whole process, from merger announcement to concessions made to community groups to eventual consolidation, is more akin to Kabuki theater than transparent regulatory scrutiny, because bank mergers – at least over the past 15 years – have been virtually guaranteed approval.

In 2019, Senator. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) Removed all doubt by forcing Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell to publicly admit that since 2006 the Fed had approved 3,813 mergers and denied zero.

But that can change. After President Biden issued his executive order last July, both the DOJ and the FDIC signaled that they will be reviewing their merger approval rules more carefully.

California Congresswoman Maxine Waters (D-Los Angeles), who chairs the House Financial Services Committee, called on regulators to rein in the US Bank-Union Bank deal and other pending mergers that would create banks with more $100 billion in assets until federal agencies draft new regulations.

Echoing the Reinvestment Coalition’s call for public merger hearings, Waters wrote in a December 2021 letter to federal regulators that evidence “has shown that bank consolidation is hurting small business lending, financial inclusion, financial stability and the rights of workers in financial institutions”.

In its opposition to the merger, the CRC drew attention to the US bank’s branch closures in low-income neighborhoods and communities of color. The group cited a study by the National Community Reinvestment Coalition which showed that US Bank closed a quarter of its 643 California branches between 2017 and 2020. The CRC fears that the consolidation could lead to additional closings, which would encourage more people turning to high-cost check cashing and payday loans.

The bank’s lending record also shows that racial disparities persist for borrowers in California, despite its better CRA score.

In 2020, US Bank declined just 24% of loan applications from white areas, compared to 30% of applicants from predominantly African American neighborhoods and nearly 38% from predominantly Latino communities.

The data, derived from banking disclosures to federal regulators, also shows that in 2020, about 38% of Californians lived in majority-white communities, with roughly the same percentage in majority-Latino neighborhoods. But 56% of the bank’s loan applicants were white and only 16.1% were Latino.

* * *

American bank spokesperson Jeff Shelman argued in an email to Capital & Main that “the bank’s loan underwriting and approval processes have been carefully designed with fair lending requirements in mind.” He highlighted $37 million in charitable donations and $1.3 billion in community development investments, such as a recently built Building of 98 units in San Bernardino County or a from motel to affordable housing conversion in Anaheim. Shelman didn’t say the bank wouldn’t be closing branches, but he said, “We won’t leave any community that Union Bank currently serves and we’re committed to keeping all front-line branch employees.”

But the CRC insists that the banks put their commitments in writing. Gonzalez-Brito said Bank of America officials had held at least two “listening sessions” with his group, but so far no real negotiations.

“I’m surprised how slowly they’re moving,” she said, adding that the community groups she works with are getting nervous.

Now, with more critical merger reviews on the horizon, groups like CRC and New York State’s Buffalo Niagara Reinvestment Coalition may have greater leverage, and banks may be willing to spend more. for the communities in order to consolidate.

“I hope there will be a real change in the way banks approach mergers,” said Kathryn Franco of the Buffalo coalition.

Copyright 2022 Capital & Main

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Former Ugandan street child blossoms as an American adoptive father https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/former-ugandan-street-child-blossoms-as-an-american-adoptive-father/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 14:32:59 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/former-ugandan-street-child-blossoms-as-an-american-adoptive-father/ [ad_1] CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA – Peter Mutabazi was 10 years old and desperate when he fled his abusive father and his home in the town of Kabale in southwestern Uganda. “Life was just miserable,” he recalls. “I went to the bus station and asked the lady, ‘Hey, which bus goes the furthest? And I ended […]]]>


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Peter Mutabazi was 10 years old and desperate when he fled his abusive father and his home in the town of Kabale in southwestern Uganda.

“Life was just miserable,” he recalls. “I went to the bus station and asked the lady, ‘Hey, which bus goes the furthest? And I ended up in Kampala.

He lived on the streets of the capital for about four years, foraging for food and for a safe place to sleep – until a nice stranger put him in the way from a Ugandan street child to an American foster father. .

The boy was hanging out in a market, offering to help shoppers transport their wares, earn some money, and maybe eat a banana.

Peter Mutabazi, his children and his dogs pose on the steps of their home in Charlotte, North Carolina. He adopted Anthony, top left, and welcomes Zay, top right, and two younger children. (Betty Ayoub / VOA)

“When I saw this man, I think I wanted to steal some food from him,” Mutabazi recalled on a recent Saturday in December, sitting in the well-equipped kitchen of his home in Charlotte, North Carolina. But the man surprised the boy. “When I tried to get food from him, he said, ‘Hey, what’s your name? You know, no one has ever asked me my name.

Students gather for a meal at Mwisi Primary School in Peter Mutabazi's hometown of Kabale, southwestern Uganda.  Mutabazi helps raise funds for the school.  (Photo courtesy of Peter Mutabazi)

Students gather for a meal at Mwisi Primary School in Peter Mutabazi’s hometown of Kabale, southwestern Uganda. Mutabazi helps raise funds for the school. (Photo courtesy of Peter Mutabazi)

The man gave her respect – and food. And after repeated visits to the market, where he looked for young Peter, the man offered him the chance to go to school.

“For the very first time, someone saw the best in me,” said Mutabazi, now 47. “… He saw a child with potential and he was ready to say, ‘You know what, I want to invest in you. I want to do something for you. And that’s what changed my life.

The man enrolled the boy in a boarding school in Kampala, where he thrived. Later, Mutabazi worked and received scholarships to study business administration at Makerere University in the capital, then went to Oak Hill College, a theological academy in London, and Master’s University, a Christian institution. from southern California.

Entry into paternity

Eventually, real estate work led Mutabazi to Oklahoma City, Oklahoma State, in the south-central United States. He volunteered to mentor teens in foster care, when a social worker encouraged him to get even more involved. He signed up that day for foster parent training.

That was in 2017. Since then, Mutabazi has strived to bring out the best in young people who, like him, have experienced neglect, abuse, rejection or other hardships. It has taken in 20 children so far.

The first child placed with Mutabazi was white, as were all four of his current offspring.

“I was shocked, wait a minute the kid doesn’t look like me,” Mutabazi said. He quickly learned that violence and neglect are not discriminatory. And he decided, “Hey, I’m here to stand up for every child. “

Mutabazi has since looked after young people of diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds: African-American, Native American, Hispanic and Caucasian, he said. Of the nearly 424,000 children placed in foster care in the United States in the most recent federal snapshot, 44% were White, 23% were Black or African American, and 21% were Hispanic.

A distinctive dad

Observers say Mutabazi is rare among American adoptive parents: a single, black, foreign-born male.

“It’s extremely rare for a single person to be placed in foster care,” said Ken Maxwell, executive director of Seven Homes Inc., a North Carolina faith-based agency that has placed six children with Mutabazi. “It is rare to see African Americans adopt Caucasian children,” added Maxwell.

However, this was the case with Anthony. He arrived in Mutabazi at the age of 11 whose adoptive family had renounced parental rights after nine years. Mutabazi agreed to take the boy for a weekend visit.

“Once I got the story, I think it goes back to my time 10 or 11 years ago,” Mutabazi said, remembering to be “helpless, unwanted, not knowing what your future is. there was a kid in front of me who just reminded me of myself.

“My father’s story has really helped me connect with him better,” said Anthony, now 15. “… I realized that me and him, we’ve both been through a lot.”

It was adopted in November 2017 in a courtroom in Charlotte, where Mutabazi had moved to work as a regional director for World Vision, a Christian non-profit anti-poverty organization.

“As much as I help them through their trauma, they also help me through my own trauma. … They teach me so much about myself too, ”Mutabazi said.

Mutabazi added that he also relied on almost daily calls and texts with the man who had researched him in the Ugandan market a long time ago. Mutabazi said her informal adoptive father prefers not to be named publicly.

A demanding job

The entrepreneurial spirit that helped Mutabazi survive his difficult childhood has taken on new dimensions. He scaled back his work with World Vision, continuing as a speaker and children’s advocate for the organization, to allow more time for fatherhood (he receives a government allowance for the care of each child). He flips houses, improves and resells every property. As #FosterDadFlipper, he became a social media influencer, with over 132,000 followers on Instagram. He has a YouTube channel, Now I Am Known, which features some of his family’s experiences and antics. He markets a plush “support dog” resembling the family’s golden doodle, Simba, with a collar bearing affirmative phrases such as “You Count.”

Mutabazi doesn’t stop flipping houses: he also wants to overturn a series of negative stereotypes, emphasizing instead that most black men are responsible and engaged fathers, and that single men can provide a safe and child-friendly home. with a host family.

Also, “as an immigrant to the United States,” he said, “I think I would like people to know that we are here and that we are changing lives.”

When going out with his children, Mutabazi said he sometimes comes across prejudices and suspicions about differences in skin color.

Recently, at a big box store, he and his kids lined up to sample a food item for free, he said. The woman distributing the samples told the children that she needed a parent’s permission. “And they just said, ‘But he’s right here,’ Mutabazi said. “… There is a false narrative that I am not worthy to be the father of white children or that I do not have the skills and principles to raise white children. …. Yes, they don’t look like me, but they are my family.

Maxwell of Seven Homes sees a positive ripple effect from Mutabazi’s placement.

“What’s really going to be remarkable is all of these kids that he touched. They are going to come out and change the lives of others, ”said Maxwell. “And so, the impact of one will be spread over the years. It’s gonna be amazing.

Betty Ayoub of the Africa Division of VOA reported from Charlotte, North Carolina with Carol Guensburg of Washington, DC

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In the United States, the United States tries to find the graves of the Indian residential schools | Indigenous rights news https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/in-the-united-states-the-united-states-tries-to-find-the-graves-of-the-indian-residential-schools-indigenous-rights-news/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 15:55:35 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/in-the-united-states-the-united-states-tries-to-find-the-graves-of-the-indian-residential-schools-indigenous-rights-news/ [ad_1] San Francisco, CA – Phil Smith’s parents dropped him off at the Charles H Burke Indian School in New Mexico when he was five, in 1954. A member of the Navajo Nation, Smith attended boarding school just outside the country’s borders for a year, before moving to other similar schools in the United States. […]]]>


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San Francisco, CA – Phil Smith’s parents dropped him off at the Charles H Burke Indian School in New Mexico when he was five, in 1954.

A member of the Navajo Nation, Smith attended boarding school just outside the country’s borders for a year, before moving to other similar schools in the United States.

He spoke the Navajo language when he arrived, but was taught that “it isn’t good, it’s not useful, (and) you just have to learn English,” Smith’s daughter Farina explained. King, who shared his story with Al Jazeera.

As a result, Smith did not teach King or his siblings the Navajo language. “And then I’m not learning Navajo, and I’m placed in this very difficult position where I’m the one who has to do this reconnection work,” she said.

Hundreds of schools

In 1927, the Office of Indian Affairs, an agency of the federal government, converted old army buildings at Fort Wingate, about 210 km (130 miles) west of Albuquerque, into a school for Navajo and Zuni children.

In the 1860s, the ancestors of Navajo students were forced to walk in what is known as the “Long March” to Fort Sumner, where they were confined. A third is dead disease and starvation.

According to a researcher who visited the Charles H Burke Indian School in 1927 as part of an investigation into residential schools in the United States, a Navajo girl died of tuberculosis on the morning of her visit.

In The Meriam Report, an investigation into the living conditions of Native Americans across the country, Lewis Meriam wrote that school “was as painful as any place I have visited.”

The U.S. government has operated at least 367 schools (PDF) like this – institutions of forced assimilation that aimed to exterminate Indigenous language and culture, according to the Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition. The United States operated 25 of these schools and supported hundreds more that were run by churches, most often the Catholic Church.

Federal investigation

In June, following the discovery of hundreds of graves of Indigenous children at Kamloops Indian Residential School in western Canada, US Home Secretary Deb Haaland ordered a federal task force to investigate on school graves.

It was then that King said she realized that she exists today because her father and her ancestors outlived the institutions.

“In the United States, there has to be genuine recognition at all levels of the critical masses – not only from the top to the bottom of government, but how do we get Americans from all walks of life and all walks of life to understand the significance of that? said the king.

Now the search for missing children and graves has started in the United States. Native American communities have long known that graves existed at the sites of former residential schools, and they have borne the brunt of the trauma of survivors for generations.

In July, the remains of nine Lakota children who died at the government-run Carlisle Indian Industrial School in Pennsylvania were returned to their families.

Earlier this month, the Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition – the group that pushed the government to release residential school records for six years – announced it would work with the Home Office on its investigation.

The department is now consulting with indigenous communities, including tribal governments, Alaskan indigenous societies and Hawaiian indigenous groups, on key issues to be included in its report, a spokesperson wrote in an email. The consultation will also lay the groundwork for future work on the site to protect potential graves.

“Topics discussed include appropriate protocols for handling sensitive information in existing cases, potential repatriation of human remains, and management of former residential school sites,” the spokesperson wrote.

The task force is expected to submit a report by April 1 of next year.

“They most certainly have graves”

The schools, which operated from the late 1800s to the 1970s in the United States, were part of a policy that forced Indigenous peoples to leave their lands and settle on reservations. In an 1892 wordUS Army officer Richard Pratt, who founded one of the first schools, described the policy as: “Kill the Indian in him and save the man.” “

The American system inspired Canada’s similar network of so-called “residential schools”; in an 1879 report, Nicholas Flood Davin, then Minister of the Interior of Canada advised Canada adopts the Indian residential school system from the United States.

From 2008 to 2015, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada collected the testimonies of 7,000 survivors of the institutions. The Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement compensated students who attended 139 schools in Canada. An estimated 150,000 First Nations, Métis and Inuit children passed through the system, and the commission estimated that 6,000 children died in schools from disease, starvation, abuse, fires and others. causes.

Christine McCleave, CEO of the Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition, told Al Jazeera that she hopes the U.S. task force, along with a bill in Congress to establish a truth commission, will allow the government American to hear the testimony of survivors, in the same way as what happened. in Canada.

The United States had at least twice as many schools as Canada, so McCleave said she believed at least twice as many Indigenous people went through institutions. She also predicted that the U.S. government would likely find out that most schools have graves associated with them.

“If they were open at the turn of the century, then they most definitely have graves, because there was a high rate of student deaths from tuberculosis and influenza – preventable diseases,” she said. declared.

The Canadian commission has declared the schools a cultural genocide, and McCleave wants a similar statement from the United States. “Anyone can look at the United Nations definition of genocide and see that the United States has done all of these things to the indigenous people of this country. “

Research protocol

Marsha Small, a researcher from North Cheyenne, conducted an investigation in 2019 using multiple scan tools that found a total of 222 graves at the site of the former Indian School in Chemawa, Oregon.

That total included 210 graves associated with the residential school, Small said, while community members unrelated to the residential school era were also buried in the cemetery.

Small asked survivors about the harsh punishments at school; one person said his father still had scars after being whipped in Chemawa, Small told Al Jazeera. “They were really concentration camps, they were really prisons,” she said of the schools.

It was genocide, she said. “It is an eradication of our people.

Together, Small and King develop protocols for how to respond when graves are discovered in residential schools. King said he shared these protocols with the Navajo Nation.

When remains are found, they likely came from multiple nations, and each nation has different protocols for how to respond to graves, Small said. Some countries want the use of ground penetrating radar, while others do not want their children to be disturbed in any way. “They could be buried right next to each other,” she said.

Meanwhile, McCleave and Small are also calling on the federal government to establish a crisis line for survivors of the institutions. “The bandage has been ripped off, the scab is exposed, ripped off, and now it’s a raw sore,” Small said.

The Home Office told Al Jazeera that India’s federal health services are working with indigenous leaders to develop culturally appropriate resources to support those who may experience trauma as a result of the task force’s investigation.

McCleave said she hopes the April report will specifically mention schools with which graves are associated. “I see this as a very promising start on a long road ahead of truth and healing,” she said.

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Tribal College Helps More Indigenous Students By Expanding Reach https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/tribal-college-helps-more-indigenous-students-by-expanding-reach/ Mon, 13 Dec 2021 20:44:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/tribal-college-helps-more-indigenous-students-by-expanding-reach/ [ad_1] During the pandemic, Tohono O’odham Community College, founded in 1998 to serve his tribe, moved all of their courses online and made them free to any Indigenous student. Enrollment nearly doubled to over 900 students. Tohono O’odham has seen the biggest increase of any tribal college – 96% in 2020. Why we wrote this […]]]>


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During the pandemic, Tohono O’odham Community College, founded in 1998 to serve his tribe, moved all of their courses online and made them free to any Indigenous student.

Enrollment nearly doubled to over 900 students. Tohono O’odham has seen the biggest increase of any tribal college – 96% in 2020.

Why we wrote this

Can a tribal college support the culture of its own community while enrolling students from many other Native American groups? A school in Arizona has made a commitment to try.

There are now 55 tribal nations represented among the students, down from eight or nine, says college president Paul Robertson. The growing diversity has raised questions about the identity of the small college and how best it can contribute to Indigenous education.

College deans, faculty and staff have spoken in recent weeks to address what Dr Robertson initially called an “existential crisis” which begged the question, “What are we?” The school has since decided that it “can adapt to changes while retaining our identity,” notes the president.

Josie Pete of the Paiute Indian tribe of Utah founded the college a year ago. Online classes and free tuition allowed him to study from his home on the Utah reservation.

“It was something that was practical,” she says. “I didn’t really have to ask myself, ‘How am I going to pay for school? How am I going to pay for the books? “

TOHONO O’ODHAM NATION, Arizona.

Deep in the Sonoran Desert, near the Arizona-Mexico border, the picnic tables under the Ramadas at Tohono O’odham Community College are empty. A new amphitheater for songs, prayers and ceremonies is silent under a November sun.

But the college, located in the Tohono O’odham Nation, about an hour west of Tucson, has more students than ever before, but not on campus.

During the pandemic, the college, founded in 1998 to serve its tribe, moved all of its courses online and offered them free to any Indigenous student. Enrollment nearly doubled to over 900 students. Tohono O’odham has seen the biggest increase of any tribal college – 96% in 2020.

Why we wrote this

Can a tribal college support the culture of its own community while enrolling students from many other Native American groups? A school in Arizona has made a commitment to try.

The students loved the online classes and the free tuition so much that when the college reopened this fall, they didn’t return to campus. And the college has diversified. There are now 55 tribal nations represented among the students, down from eight or nine, says college president Paul Robertson. Growing diversity is changing the makeup of a campus rooted in service to the Tohono O’odham people, raising concerns about the identity of the small college and how it can best contribute to Indigenous education.

College deans, faculty and staff have come together in recent weeks to address what Dr Robertson initially called an “existential crisis” which begged the question, “What are we?” “

The question resonates across the country of India as tribal colleges and universities, heavily funded and federally founded to serve their specific communities, strive to meet a vast need for indigenous students in higher education. .

Colleges “against some really negative forces in our culture in terms of letting go of your background,” says Jon Reyhner, professor of education at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff and co-author of American Indian Education: A History. “Knowing your history breeds resilience. “


College President Paul Robertson stands near the new amphitheater on the Tohono O’odham Community College campus. The immense need of all native students suggests that the college has a purpose beyond its tribe. “There are a lot of students there,” he says. “I think we’re starting to see it.”

The Tohono O’odham Nation founded its college, one of some 35 tribal colleges in the country, with the goal of preserving the culture and traditions of a people whose ties to the region go back thousands of years. But college president Dr. Robertson says the immense need of all Indigenous students suggests the college has a purpose beyond its tribe. “There are a lot of students there,” he says. “I think we’re starting to see it.”

Josie Pete from the Paiute Indian tribe of Utah said she likely could not have enrolled in Tohono O’odham Community College a year ago without the availability of online classes and free classes since she worked from her home on the Utah reservation.

“It was something that was practical,” she says. “I didn’t really have to ask myself, ‘How am I going to pay for school? How am I going to pay for the books? ”

Ms. Pete wanted to study art and the college sent her supplies including sketchbooks, pencils, paints and charcoal. “The school believed in me enough to send me the supplies,” she says. “It was really special.”

Despite being from a different tribe, Ms Pete says she enjoyed taking Tohono O’odham’s compulsory language and history classes. “I actually totally agree,” she says. “It’s unique to discover another culture that is similar to mine. “

When she’s finished in about a year, she plans to go to a four-year institution where she can also study online to earn a bachelor’s degree in art and eventually become an illustrator.


Josie Pete, a member of the Paiute Indian tribe of Utah, began attending Tohono O’odham Community College during the pandemic. She lives in Utah and was able to take all of her classes online.

Feed a thirst for education

Tohono O’odham Community College has been able to accommodate additional students, like Ms Pete, thanks to a combination of federal funds and support from the Tohono O’odham Nation, which provides about 42% of the college’s annual budget, according to Dr. Robertson. Federal funding for tribal colleges and universities is only given to Native American students, who make up 95% of Tohono O’odham’s students.

The school is a model for what other tribal colleges and universities can achieve by developing a strong online presence, said Carrie Billy, president and CEO of the American Indian Higher Education Consortium.

“This is exactly how we want to serve aboriginal people wherever they are,” says Billy. “There is a thirst for culturally based education. “

Drawing native students from everywhere online can only enhance the academic success of American Indians, says Ofelia Zepeda, chair of the board of trustees of Tohono O’odham Community College and professor of linguistics at the University of Arizona in Tucson. “It’s just great to see because it’s been so long in coming.”

American Indian graduation rates have long been difficult: 15% of American Indians and Alaska Natives aged 25 and over have a bachelor’s degree or above, compared to 32% of Americans in this group. age, according to census figures. In Arizona, home to one of the largest indigenous populations in the country, the numbers for both groups lag even further, with 11% of American Indians and Alaska Natives aged 25 and over titular. a bachelor’s degree or higher, compared to 29% of Arizonans this age. group.

Studies have shown that the culturally enriched experience in tribal colleges fuels student success. Lessons in indigenous language, culture and history about their tribes are key to the program. This is the purpose of a tribal college or university – to build and win back a community. Schools are evaluated based on their specific tribe relationships. The tribal college movement of the late 1960s and 1970s grew out of the oppression and frustration that many Native American children suffered after decades of forced assimilation into Western customs at residential schools. Most tribal college graduates stay or return to their reserve.

The Tohono O’odham Nation, one of the largest in the country at nearly 3 million acres, has approximately 34,000 registered members, including those who live in Mexico, said Bernard Siquieros, vice chairman of the board of administration of the college.

The tribe founded the college to “provide an opportunity for our young people to have a good starting point in their higher education journey,” Siquieros said. The teaching of the nation’s language, history and culture – known as Himdag – is a key element of the study program. But welcoming students from other tribes helps all native students and the college, he says.

Yet the college balances this with its original mandate. Some students from other tribes ask to take a class in their own tribal language, but that is not what Tohono O’odham Community College is, says Alberta Espinoza, a university counselor. Students understand, she says, when she tells them, “This is Tohono O’odham Community College,” and they don’t have to pay tuition as a native student, she says.

“The universal Indigenous worldview is like, ‘It’s a gift,’” says Ms. Espinoza. “You just don’t look like a gift horse in your mouth. And so, be respectful. You take what’s given to you and go from there.

“It was like a family”

Authorities want students to return to the physical campus, offering incentives such as free meals and gas vouchers. And there are plans for a completed wellness center and a four-year diploma in Tohono O’odham studies.

Caralina Antone, who is currently studying for her bachelor’s degree at Arizona State University, credits the supportive atmosphere at the university for helping her return to college.

“They continued to encourage me,” she says. “It was like a family. … You’re not alone.”

Many indigenous people, like Ms. Antone, live in urban areas but wish to attend tribal colleges, which are often located in rural and remote areas. Mrs Antone, an orphan raised by her grandmother, wanted to attend Tohono O’odham middle school because it was her grandmother’s tribe. At first, she commuted nearly six hours a day from the Phoenix area to college and back. “I got up at 3 am to be out at 4:30 am,” she says. “I wanted to pay tribute to him and finish my studies.”

She missed having in-person classes after the pandemic started, but adapted to working online. She was college student of the year when she graduated in 2020. She hopes to become a social worker and help teens.

“You have to finish what you started,” she said. “I’m glad I got out of it.”

Tohono O’odham Community College officials gathered last week and are “united” in saying that the “mission of the college will remain the same” as the college faces a future rooted in serving the students of many others tribes, says Dr. Robertson in an email.

“Through much discussion, we came to a consensus that we can adapt to changes,” he notes, “while retaining our identity. “

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The “opaque” finances of the Indian school of Chemawa under surveillance https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/the-opaque-finances-of-the-indian-school-of-chemawa-under-surveillance/ Sat, 04 Dec 2021 00:47:40 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/the-opaque-finances-of-the-indian-school-of-chemawa-under-surveillance/ [ad_1] Merkley and Wyden Investigate Chemawa Indian School by: Joelle Jones Posted: Dec 3 2021 / 16:47 PST / Update: Dec 3 2021 / 17:01 PST Chemawa Indian School (KOIN) PORTLAND, Ore. (KOIN) – Following allegations of alleged financial misconduct against the state’s last residential school for Native American students, Senators Wyden and Merkley have […]]]>


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Merkley and Wyden Investigate Chemawa Indian School

Chemawa Indian School (KOIN)

PORTLAND, Ore. (KOIN) – Following allegations of alleged financial misconduct against the state’s last residential school for Native American students, Senators Wyden and Merkley have appealed to Inspector General to investigate the Chemawa Indian School in Salem, Oregon.

In a letter co-signed to Mark Lee Greenblatt on October 25, lawmakers called for transparency.

“This is a letter from an ongoing investigation that we have been doing for years because we are so dissatisfied,” Merkley said. “We are dissatisfied with the school’s financial practices, the lack of transparency in their accounting and a complete void as to the role of the school board in exercising real leadership.

According to the letter, the allegations of financial mismanagement of school funds date back to 2015.

Senators cited a review by the Office of the Inspector General of the US Department of the Interior in July 2015, which found that the Indian school in Chemawa “did not properly assess the academic needs of its students” and was ” unable to effectively prioritize its resources to ensure the academic success of its student population.

Since the 2015 report, lawmakers say they have yet to receive financial data from the school, despite multiple requests.

In an interview with KOIN 6 News, Merkley said, “We are not convinced that our Native American children in school are getting the opportunity they fully deserve, and we can do better.”

Most of the alleged allegations described in the letter relate to concerns that money for student programs has been mismanaged.

Asked about the alleged allegations, Merkley said: ‘While I cannot go into details, they all fall into the general category that funds have been poorly spent in many ways and not directed to programs. that the school is supposed to provide. for kids, ”Merkley continued. “And that is simply unacceptable.”

Currently, no federal charges have been filed against the school regarding these alleged allegations.

In the October letter, senators acknowledged that the allegations had been difficult to investigate due to the school’s “opaque financial practices”, citing the lack of a “satisfactory response” to their requests as a source of concern.

“Chemawa students and their families deserve answers to these questions that have been hanging around the school for far too long,” Wyden said in a statement to KOIN 6 News. “This is why Senator Merkley and I are pushing federal agencies for answers that offer a quick path to resolution and transparency that include steps such as annual budget audits, quarterly financial reviews, visits to significant monitoring sites and a functioning school board. “

Wyden continued, “All of these supervisory steps are essential for these students to have the best chance of success.”

Both senators say they have yet to receive a response from the Inspector General regarding the letter or requests for the agency to update its 2015 review of the school.

KOIN 6 News contacted the US Department of the Interior’s Office of the Inspector General and received the following statement:

We have received the senators’ request for the Chemawa Indian School and it is currently under review. Overseeing the taxpayer dollars that funds Native American schools and making recommendations for improvement is a priority for our office. We have repeatedly identified the management of Indian schools as a major challenge facing the Home Office and have issued reports regarding conditions in school facilities and monitoring of school expenses, among other issues.

Erica E. Paulson
Deputy Inspector General, Parliamentary and External Affairs
Ministry of the Interior, Office of the Inspector General

The Indian school of Chemawa and the Indian Education Bureau did not immediately respond to inquiries from KOIN 6 regarding the alleged allegations and the letter posed by Senators Merkley and Wyden.

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Free or reduced tuition now extends to all University of Minnesota campuses https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/free-or-reduced-tuition-now-extends-to-all-university-of-minnesota-campuses/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/free-or-reduced-tuition-now-extends-to-all-university-of-minnesota-campuses/#respond Tue, 02 Nov 2021 23:15:14 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/free-or-reduced-tuition-now-extends-to-all-university-of-minnesota-campuses/ [ad_1] This opportunity will be a huge relief for some, if not many families in the Native American community. “It really removes at least one barrier, financial for low to moderate income Native American learners. And, in addition to the freshman in 2022, he will also be offered for tribal college transfers. So the hope […]]]>


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This opportunity will be a huge relief for some, if not many families in the Native American community. “It really removes at least one barrier, financial for low to moderate income Native American learners. And, in addition to the freshman in 2022, he will also be offered for tribal college transfers. So the hope is that we let’s get this pipeline going through two-year degrees and uh take some of those barriers to getting a four-year degree, ”Ms. Diver told us.

According to the University of Minnesota website, University of Minnesota President Joan Gabel says the University has focused on improving this program for 170 years. “We have been very honest from my early days as President that we need to better serve the citizens of our tribal nations and their communities.” Gabel says that “the program is a significant step in increasing access and continuing to improve retention and graduation rates while closing the gap in opportunity …”

Eligible students with an annual family income of less than $ 75,000 can participate tuition-free. Those with families earning up to $ 125,000 per year will be eligible for tuition reductions of up to 80% to 90%.

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American Indian College Fund launches boarding school https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/american-indian-college-fund-launches-boarding-school/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/american-indian-college-fund-launches-boarding-school/#respond Tue, 26 Oct 2021 15:00:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/american-indian-college-fund-launches-boarding-school/ [ad_1] Denver, Colorado, October 26, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – The American Indian College Fund and the National Native American Boarding School (NABS) Healing Coalition have joined forces to provide scholarships to descendants of residential school survivors. Twenty scholarships of $ 3,000 each were awarded for the 2021-2022 academic year. The scholarship is designed to recognize […]]]>


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Denver, Colorado, October 26, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – The American Indian College Fund and the National Native American Boarding School (NABS) Healing Coalition have joined forces to provide scholarships to descendants of residential school survivors. Twenty scholarships of $ 3,000 each were awarded for the 2021-2022 academic year.

The scholarship is designed to recognize the experiences of residential school survivors and enable families to reunite and heal. In the application process, students share a 500-word essay on their relationship with a residential school survivor in their family. This process is designed to foster sharing and healing, while recognizing the impact of this trauma on their lives and relationships.

NABS has raised over $ 51,000 as part of a matching campaign to fund this academic year’s scholarships. In addition to financial support, the American Indian College Fund (The College Fund) provides students with holistic and culturally relevant support to facilitate persistence in education, academic success, personal and professional development, and career planning.

Christine Diindiisi McCleave, CEO of the National Native American Boarding School (NABS) Healing Coalition, said, “We know that the impacts of residential schools are intergenerational and have played a profound role in the educational disparities experienced by Native American students today. . This scholarship program is a first step for residential school descendants to heal intergenerational trauma, change their own narratives, and restore what was taken from us by residential schools.

Cheryl Crazy Bull, president and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said Indigenous students are reclaiming education. We are all survivors of intentional damage to the rights of our tribes to educate and socialize their own people. The College Fund is honored to work with NABS to support those directly affected by boarding schools. It helps us all to regain the abundant and healthy lifestyles that are our right. “

To be eligible for the scholarship, a student must be a U.S. citizen, member of a federally or state-recognized tribe or descendant of a tribe, a residential school survivor, or a direct descendant of residential school survivors. and enrolled full-time in a non-profit organization. higher education institution in the United States. Students do not need to demonstrate financial need for this scholarship. Applicants must complete the College Fund’s Online Full Circle Scholarship Application and a 500-word personal essay on the Boarding School Assimilation Model. Interested students can apply at https://collegefund.org/students/scholarships/.

About the National Native American Boarding School (NABS) Healing Coalition: The mission of the National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition (NABS) is to lead the pursuit of understanding and resolution of the continuing trauma created by the residential school policy of the United States. NABS’s work centers on the search for truth, justice and healing for residential school survivors and descendants.

About the American Indian College Fund– The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Indigenous higher education for 32 years. The College Fund estimates that “education is the answer” and provided $ 15.5 million in scholarships and other direct aid to Native American students in 2020-2021. Since its inception in 1989, The College Fund has provided over $ 259 million in scholarships, programs and The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and supportive programs at the country’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, located in or at proximity to Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools they need to graduate and succeed in their careers. Regularly receives top marks from independent charity reviewers and is one of the nation’s Top 100 Charities Named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.

Journalists: The American Indian College Fund does not use the acronym AICF. For the second referral, please use the College Fund.

Contact:


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