public private – World Socialist CWI http://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ Wed, 13 Apr 2022 11:18:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4-150x150.png public private – World Socialist CWI http://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ 32 32 Royal Oak Planning Commission recommends denying marijuana business near school https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/royal-oak-planning-commission-recommends-denying-marijuana-business-near-school/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 23:53:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/royal-oak-planning-commission-recommends-denying-marijuana-business-near-school/ Members of the public pack the rooms of Royal Oak City Hall for a public hearing into a proposed marijuana facility within 100 feet of the Oakland Schools Southeast Technical Campus. A rendering shows the proposed marijuana retail development at 420 E. Harrison Ave. near Lincoln Avenue and Main Street. On February 8, the Royal […]]]>

Members of the public pack the rooms of Royal Oak City Hall for a public hearing into a proposed marijuana facility within 100 feet of the Oakland Schools Southeast Technical Campus.

A rendering shows the proposed marijuana retail development at 420 E. Harrison Ave. near Lincoln Avenue and Main Street. On February 8, the Royal Oak Planning Commission recommended that the City Commission approve the special land use and site plan for the project.

Rendering courtesy of Stucky Vitale Architects

    A render shows the proposed marijuana grower, processor and retailer at 5130 Meijer Drive near Coolidge Highway and 14 Mile Road.  On February 8, the Royal Oak Planning Commission recommended that the City Commission deny the special land use and site plan.

A render shows the proposed marijuana grower, processor and retailer at 5130 Meijer Drive near Coolidge Highway and 14 Mile Road. On February 8, the Royal Oak Planning Commission recommended that the City Commission deny the special land use and site plan.

Rendering provided by Krieger Klatt Architects

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ROYAL OAK — On February 8, the Royal Oak Planning Commission held public hearings into special land use and site plans for two proposed marijuana facilities selected from more than 30 applicants by the City Manager’s office.

The Planning Commission voted 3 to 2 to recommend rejection of the Gatsby Cannabis Co. proposal and 3 to 1 to recommend approval of the Royal Treatment proposal. The Royal Oak City Commission will have the final say on both points.

Two planning commissioners — Eric Klooster and Woody Gontina — were absent from the meeting.

Proposal from Gatsby Cannabis Co.
Members of the public packed rooms at Royal Oak City Hall over the first proposal after Oakland Schools made their opposition to the Gatsby Cannabis Co.’s proximity to the Schools Tech Campus widely known. Oakland-Southeast.

The plan calls for an 8,400 square foot growing area, a 1,400 square foot processing area and a 1,600 square foot retail space. The petitioners are proposing a complete exterior upgrade, substantial interior improvements and a significant number of environmentally sustainable features at the Karl Heinz Auto Center site, 5130 Meijer Drive.

In a letter, Oakland Schools Superintendent Wanda Cook-Robinson wrote, “If approved, Gatsby Cannabis Co. may operate within yards of our OSTC-SE. Michigan law prohibits a marijuana establishment from operating within 1,000 feet of a pre-existing public or private school.

During the meeting, Oakland Schools Legal Counsel Lara Kapalla-Bondi said the distance from the proposed marijuana business was 88 feet.

” This is unheard of ! I don’t know of any other community that allows a marijuana facility near a school,” Kapalla-Bondi said. “City ordinances require a buffer zone of 1,000 feet (with schools with a curriculum equivalent to K-12).”

She said the Tech Center provides vocational instruction and training to 11th and 12th graders who are bussed from county high schools for morning and afternoon sessions.

She added that the Michigan Regulation and Taxation of Marihuana Act also provides for a buffer zone of 1,000 feet from a school.

“(Endorsing this) sends a horrible message that the value of children is determined by their career path,” she said. “There is no way to grant a special land use permit for this site without violating state law or demeaning the aspirations of 800 children.”

Parents and other members of the public have expressed concerns about traffic, visual distractions and messages.

Royal Oak City Attorney Aaron Leal said the school was established before the area in question was zoned industrial; while its ability to operate as a school would not be permitted under the current zoning map, it is grandfathered.

He said he could not comment on the particular issue of proximity because two lawsuits had been filed against the city, including one relating to the school buffer, and he had not yet been able to discuss the cases with the city commission. in camera.

Leal said the city’s zoning amendments regarding marijuana regulations provide “deviations from required standards that allow for deviation from setback,” including the 1,000-foot buffer zone.

Planning Commission members said the map the city made available to potential applicants regarding marijuana facilities identified industrial areas where such activity is permitted, but did not include the vocational school.

“I think when staff were looking at schools, they were looking at schools in traditional single-family zoning, where schools are supposed to be,” Planning Commissioner Sharlan Douglas said. “Applicants developed plans and submitted proposals on the assumption that there was no educational buffer or educational setback in this area.”

She said the petitioners made a “good faith request” to us and that the body should “judge it based on that good faith request”.

Mayor Michael Fournier said he was “struggling with the technicalities of the law,” citing that he believed the project met the seven special land use criteria set out in city ordinances regulating such projects.

Douglas and Fournier, who both voted against denying the special land use and site plan, also both sit on the city commission. Planning commissioners Gary Quesada, Ann Bueche and Paul Curtis voted in favor of the denial recommendation.

Quesada said that while he thought it was a “great project,” he didn’t believe the agency “had the discretion to override state law in this case.”

Bueche said she felt the school should have been identified on the map and that its omission was “regrettable” because Royal Oak voters support recreational marijuana retailers in the city.

“I think the buffer should be maintained, personally,” she said. “Given it’s a school and given the 1,000 feet, I can’t support this project either.”

Curtis said he didn’t have a problem with cannabis in the community, but he objected to “treating this particular school any differently than any other school in our community.”

“I don’t want to communicate to students that they are somehow different from other students in our community,” Curtis said.

Proposed royal treatment
The second public hearing involved Royal Treatment, a proposed marijuana retailer located in a vacant approximately 3,000 square foot building at 408 to 424 E. Harrison Ave. It would combine the parcels and operate as 420 E. Harrison Ave.

The petitioners propose substantial exterior and interior improvements, including environmentally sustainable features such as a pocket park, gated parking lot, green roof, solar panels and wind turbines. If approved, the operators have pledged $50,000 a year to Royal Oak charities.

Residents of nearby residential properties opposed the project. Concerns included traffic from the estimated 200 to 300 initial sales per day, an increase in crime, as well as a divergence from the character of the area.

Many neighbors said the area in question, although zoned industrial, is a haven for high-end residential developments that have led to a “south-end renaissance” of the city.

The property in question is located approximately 50 feet from the building of Phil Baciak, who spoke at the meeting and wrote a letter of opposition to the project on behalf of the residents of 33 on Harrison Condos. It is also near Lawson Park.

“The City of Royal Oak has nearly 12 square miles of land – we as a community must protect the sanctity of our neighborhoods and refuse to allow these high traffic retail businesses (similar to a fast food restaurant ) to open in areas that we have turned into beautiful residential areas,” wrote Christopher Ott, president of The Crossings at Irving Avenue Homeowners Association, in a letter to the Planning Commission.

Fournier said he understood the traffic issues.

“I’m not sure there’s a solution for everything that would go there,” he said.

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Nicaragua to take over six universities seen as critical of Ortega – Organization for World Peace https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/nicaragua-to-take-over-six-universities-seen-as-critical-of-ortega-organization-for-world-peace/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 01:57:25 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/nicaragua-to-take-over-six-universities-seen-as-critical-of-ortega-organization-for-world-peace/ Lawmakers loyal to Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega passed legislation on Monday transferring control of six top universities to the state. The legislation is the latest in a series of moves designed to stifle opposition to Ortega’s authoritarian government. Officials claimed that universities were closed due to non-compliance with financial regulations. Opponents, however, say the charges […]]]>

Lawmakers loyal to Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega passed legislation on Monday transferring control of six top universities to the state. The legislation is the latest in a series of moves designed to stifle opposition to Ortega’s authoritarian government. Officials claimed that universities were closed due to non-compliance with financial regulations. Opponents, however, say the charges are just an excuse to justify the suppression of opposition movements.

The University crackdowns are the most recent bid for power by the Ortega administration attempting to eliminate all opposition and dissent. The administration has already arrested and detained more than 30 political opponents on presumably fabricated charges, ranging from well-known millionaire bankers to lesser-known student leaders. Before the closures, universities were one of the last centers of resistance to abuses of state and police power. Student protests played a central role in 2018 protests that began as opposition to a policy of Social Security reform but eventually catalyzed widespread anti-government protests.

“At the heart of these measures is a blatant attempt to undermine the student movement, one of the pillars of the struggle for democracy in Nicaragua,” said Tamara Taraciuk Broner, acting Americas director at Human Rights Watch. Opponents and academics share fears that the state’s growing influence over public and private life is a sign of accelerating crackdown efforts in the near future. Universities will likely be filled with Ortega loyalists, and criticism of the government will have quick repercussions.

Gonzalo Carrión, a lawyer for the human rights group Nicaragua Never Again, warned of the serious implications of the crackdown: “The goal is to impose a single model of thought, a vertically organized society to perpetuate Ortega in power. Ernesto Medina, the former rector of the León campus of the National Autonomous University of Nicaragua, said the government takeover was a “warning to some 30 remaining private universities”, calling the attack on the institutions a higher education “the culmination of a process of deterioration of the entire institutional framework of the country.

The latest legislation targeting universities is indicative of the erosion of democracy in Nicaragua. It functions as a deliberate and strategic maneuver to reconfigure the functioning of Nicaraguan society as a whole, a preemptive movement to suppress public dissent and student organizing as Ortega’s rule moves ever closer to total dictatorship. .

It is imperative that the international community expresses its support for Nicaraguan civilians, condemning Ortega’s flagrant abuse of power, including the sponsorship of state-sanctioned violence and the use of scare and intimidation tactics against civilians. International observers must remain categorical in their demands that political opponents wrongfully imprisoned be released, that universities remain autonomous, and that elections take place without interference, manipulation or obstruction.

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SILVERMAN’s Newest Building, Swift & Co. Brings New Life to Hamilton Park, Jersey City https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/silvermans-newest-building-swift-co-brings-new-life-to-hamilton-park-jersey-city/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 17:39:54 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/silvermans-newest-building-swift-co-brings-new-life-to-hamilton-park-jersey-city/ Swift & Co. is the newest building at SILVERMAN in Jersey City. One cannot miss the architecturally significant brick facade of the newest building in Jersey City’s historic Hamilton Park district. The nearly complete building, named Swift & Co., has a modern yet striking facade pushing the design envelope, while creating spacious apartments, retail and […]]]>
Swift & Co. is the newest building at SILVERMAN in Jersey City.

One cannot miss the architecturally significant brick facade of the newest building in Jersey City’s historic Hamilton Park district. The nearly complete building, named Swift & Co., has a modern yet striking facade pushing the design envelope, while creating spacious apartments, retail and office space.

Jersey City-based SILVERMAN’s latest development is a nine-story mixed-use building located one block from Hamilton Park. SILVERMAN began leading the transformation of Hamilton Park into a vibrant community neighborhood in 2005 with the two-block redevelopment bringing many new restaurants, shops, schools and businesses to the area. The opening of Swift & Co. marks the continuation of the company’s redevelopment plans.

Swift Co Apartments 220 Ninth Street Jersey City 7
Many residences offer views and terraces.

Swift & Co. offers studio, one-, two-, and three-bedroom residences for rent, most with terraces and scenic views.

SILVERMAN was inspired by the history of the neighborhood, with the help of the Jersey City Public Library, to name the building. In 1885, Swift & Co. stables occupied the space at 220 Ninth Street well into the 1940s. Beyond the name, the Jersey City Public Library’s historical map collection influenced the color scheme and design. typographic style.

Swift Co Apartments 220 Ninth Street Jersey City 5
The interiors focus on providing an exceptionally productive and healthy environment for residents.

Swift & Co. presents a contemporary counterpoint to the neighborhood’s 19th-century architecture while drawing inspiration from its historic industrial past with cutting-edge design by Studio V Architects. A clean form with an elegant design of bricks with various textures is essential in the context of the district.

Inspired by biophilic and Italian modern design of the 20th century, Swift & Co. interiors seek to strengthen our connection with nature, by selecting thoughtful and inspiring materials. The sleek and striking lobby features durable materials including Italian marble terrazzo and a massive, eye-catching sculptural concierge desk, carved from naturally fallen acacia, taking us back to the forest.

Swift Co Apartments 220 Ninth Street Jersey City 8
An eye-catching sculptural acacia concierge desk makes a statement in the lobby.

The lobby features orange mailboxes, inspired by the unique red-orange hue of the feathers of the Nordic flickers frequently spotted in Hamilton Park. ANDlight Pebble LED lighting above the mailboxes echoes the pebble shapes found in the terrazzo marble flooring.

Swift Co Apartments 220 Ninth Street Jersey City Mail
Orange mailboxes and lighting.

Swift & Co. offers a soothing escape from city life and cultivates a working and living community like nowhere else in Jersey City. Residents enjoy access to several shared outdoor terraces, health club membership including an indoor lap pool, and a contemporary activity-based rooftop lounge with views of the city’s skyline. Manhattan. In the base of the building, SILVERMAN will open co-working Allo, with a focus on health and wellness, linked to their popular Andco space.

Swift Co Apartments 220 Ninth Street Jersey City 3
Large rooms.

Swift & Co. apartments have a modern aesthetic with key elements adding warmth and space. Floor-to-ceiling windows and cove lighting create exceptional light and air, while multiple lighting systems and dimmers create ideal ambience and comfort.

Swift Co Apartments 220 Ninth Street Jersey City Living
Elegant kitchen.

Kitchens feature sleek cabinetry, glazed ceramic tile, Miseno cabinet hardware, and stainless steel appliances. Bathroom palettes use earth tones, sandy beige and deep ocean blue for a sense of serenity. Many apartments have a washer and dryer and a walk-in closet.

Swift Co Apartments 220 Ninth Street Jersey City 2
Luxury baths create a soothing retreat.

Interiors and creative direction by Rebecca Johnson of Swimclub Studio with architect Marie Tedrick, design by Sydelle Reed of Sydelle Interiors. Art, textiles and furniture are sourced from independent artists and designers, including Rosie Li, Brit Kleinman of Avo Studio, ZZ Driggs and Deep Space Gallery.

Swift & Co. is one block from historic Hamilton Park, surrounded by Jersey City’s finest restaurants, bars, shops and services. Every Wednesday, Hamilton Park is home to a popular Farmer’s Market featuring seasonal produce and prepared meals. The neighborhood includes Chickie Italian Restaurant, Rumba Cubana, Hamilton Inn, Madame Claude Wine and Word Bookstore. Swift & Co. is close to Newport and Grove Street PATH stations, the Holland Tunnel and the NJ Turnpike. The neighborhood is also home to some of the best public and private schools in the city, including Hamilton Park Montessori School, Scandinavian School, and Cooperative Garden Preschool.

Swift Co Apartments 220 Ninth Street Jersey City 1
Swift & Co. is already over 60% let.

Make your move now to experience Hamilton Park’s premier community and unique residential amenities, plus a luxury apartment to call home.

Swift & Co. is already proving popular among tenants. “The response has been exceptional, with demand far exceeding our expectations. We opened our rental office just three weeks ago and are now over 60% pre-let. We still have many great options available,” said Vanessa Imme, Leasing Manager for SILVERMAN.

Swift & Co. offers a variety of studio, one-, two-, and three-bedroom homes starting at $2,400. For more information, visit the SILVERMAN website or call 201-434-1000 for a private viewing.

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Rich teens tout test scores colleges no longer need | Way of life https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/rich-teens-tout-test-scores-colleges-no-longer-need-way-of-life/ Tue, 01 Feb 2022 02:58:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/rich-teens-tout-test-scores-colleges-no-longer-need-way-of-life/ Wealthy college applicants submit SAT and ACT scores at a higher rate than their low-income peers, even though many colleges — even the most selective ones — have made these tests optional. Some 53% of students from the wealthiest households submitted this school year, according to data from Common Application, the nonprofit behind the standardized […]]]>

Wealthy college applicants submit SAT and ACT scores at a higher rate than their low-income peers, even though many colleges — even the most selective ones — have made these tests optional.

Some 53% of students from the wealthiest households submitted this school year, according to data from Common Application, the nonprofit behind the standardized application form. On the other hand, only 39% of the poorest have done so.

Figures disaggregated by socioeconomic status demonstrate “that more work is needed to effectively engage and support students from diverse communities across the country in the college admissions process,” the researchers wrote in a report released this week. last. The report reflects applications for the admissions cycle through January 17.

Yet, as glaring as the differences are, the data shows that overall test submissions among rich and poor are down from the 2019-20 school year – 78% of the wealthiest sent scores during this term, while 71% of the lowest earning students did. The difference between the bidders has increased over two years.

Colleges across the United States have made requiring standardized testing optional in part to level the playing field for low-income students who may not have the same type of access to testing centers during the coronavirus pandemic. COVID-19. The tests have also long been criticized for favoring wealthier students who can afford tutoring.

Applications among first-generation students — those whose parents did not earn a bachelor’s degree — rose 20% from the previous two years. And poorer students accept offers not to send sheet music. Among recipients of fee waivers, an income indicator, 36% who received them sent scores for 2021-22.

The Common Application has seen a dramatic drop in the number of schools requesting SAT or ACT scores this year. Only 5% of the organization’s roughly 850 member schools have requested the scores, down from 55% in 2019.

Although schools have said students don’t need to submit grades, it’s still unclear how test scores are used in admissions decisions and what percentage of admitted students submitted grades, a said Jenny Rickard, executive director of the joint and former application. Head of Admissions at Bryn Mawr College.

Harvard, Yale and Princeton universities, for example, declined to provide data to Bloomberg last week on the number of applicants who entered their current freshman courses or were admitted in the first application round. in December. Last month, Harvard said the tests would be optional for several more years for eighth-graders and they would not be penalized for not submitting them.

Rickard urged schools to publish this data. “University admissions have suffered from a lack of transparency,” she said. “Now is the time for institutions to be transparent. Students are already trying to figure out if they should take the test.

Still, applicants from public or private schools with more resources are likely to continue taking the exams, said Matthew DeGreeff, dean of the college board at Middlesex, a boarding school in Concord, Massachusetts.

“Tests can only help you, they can’t hurt you,” said DeGreeff, a former Harvard admissions officer. “It can position you as a candidate.”

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©2022 Bloomberg LP Visit bloomberg.com. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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What Parents Need to Know About Private School Safety Plans K-12 schools https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/what-parents-need-to-know-about-private-school-safety-plans-k-12-schools/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 14:33:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/what-parents-need-to-know-about-private-school-safety-plans-k-12-schools/ Yet, while attention has focused on public schools, private schools have their share of challenges to ensure the safety of students in the event of disasters, shootings or other violent incident on the grounds of the city. ‘school. Maria Sommerville, who coordinates the Harley School Safety Plan in New York City, says private school safety […]]]>

Yet, while attention has focused on public schools, private schools have their share of challenges to ensure the safety of students in the event of disasters, shootings or other violent incident on the grounds of the city. ‘school.

Maria Sommerville, who coordinates the Harley School Safety Plan in New York City, says private school safety plans do not differ significantly from public schools, but noted that the smaller size of most private schools can be helpful in alleviating potential problems.

“Independent schools are usually small, tight-knit communities,” she says. “Faculty and staff need to know their community well enough to know when someone is in crisis, which helps reduce security concerns. “

Of course, private schools are not without risk of violence, although the available evidence suggests that it is rarer than in public schools.

A 2019 report by the U.S. Secret Service’s National Threat Assessment Center, called NTAC, assessed 41 incidents from 2008 to 2017 in which a recent or current student used a weapon to cause targeted violence (resulting in injury or death) on school property. Two of the cases involved private schools, according to a spokesperson for the Secret Service. A similar study by NTAC in 2021 looked at 67 cases in which schools were able to avoid a planned attack. Only one of the cases was in a private school.

Much like public schools, private schools are regulated primarily by state and local governments, and private school safety rules vary by region. Despite different laws, experts say best practices in school safety and violence prevention are largely the same for public and private institutions.

“Whether a school is public or private, school communities should follow the framework outlined in the guide from the US Secret Service’s National Threat Assessment Center,” NTAC chief Lina Alathari said in a statement.

Best practices for preventing violence in schools

The NTAC guide, titled Improving School Safety Using a Threat Assessment Model, was updated in 2018 and states that it is intended to help schools “identify students of concern. , assess their risk of engaging in violence or other harmful activities and identify intervention strategies to manage this risk.

The guide includes best practices for schools of all types:

  • Create a threat assessment team that includes faculty, staff, administrators, coaches, and others to oversee a threat assessment process.
  • Define behaviors that should trigger immediate action, such as threats, violence, or guns on campus.
  • Establish a system for students, parents, teachers and others to anonymously report concerns about potential threats. “Make sure it… is monitored by staff who will follow up on all reports,” the guide says.
  • Determine a threshold for which intervention by the police must be requested.
  • Establish threat assessment procedures that will guide the investigation of the severity of a threat. This includes establishing whether a student has communicated their plans; has access to weapons; researched attack plans or tactics; and whether there are any emotional factors and motivations that might be relevant.
  • Develop risk management options that schools will adopt after the threat assessment is complete.
  • Promote a safe school climate that encourages intervention in student conflict and / or bullying and allows students to communicate their concerns.
  • Provide training to all school staff, students, parents and law enforcement.

Jay Brotman, an architect who helped design the new Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut after a gunman killed 20 children and six staff in 2012, said school security plans should include controlling access to the school building, especially during peak periods like pick-up and drop-off.

Brotman also says that school buildings should be designed to promote both safety and positive feelings and emotions among students and faculty.

“Instead of having solid walls everywhere, you need more glass – an opening of spaces and doors,” he says. “Transparency, high visibility, good lighting, daylight – all of these increase the feeling of well-being and community, as well as security. “

How private school safety plans differ from public plans

Myra McGovern, spokesperson for the National Association of Independent Schools, said variations in school safety plans relate less to whether the institution is public or private and more to the number of students and faculty and the type of establishment in which they are housed.

Yet, she says, there are some differences between public and private schools when it comes to school safety.

“There are certain barriers that public schools face when implementing safety measures, such as having to deal with multiple layers of bureaucracy to secure funding, which independent schools are less likely to overcome,” she said. . “But there are also complexities that independent schools face that public schools may be less likely to handle, such as working with child safety details of prominent politicians in other countries.”

McGovern also noted that private boarding schools have additional challenges as “they have to consider the safety of students and teachers where they live as well as where they go to school.” For example, she noted that during the California wildfires, a boarding school was forced to evacuate and find alternative housing for all of its students and dozens of horses in its equestrian program, while also finding a safe space to continue the course.

While the national conversation on school safety has focused on school shootings in recent years, it’s also important to have plans in place for natural disasters. The Federal Emergency Management Agency provides risk assessment tools and guidelines for schools to use when developing plans.

Questions to ask

Whether it’s evaluating your existing school or choosing a new one, Sommerville says there are a few questions about safe school policies parents should ask:

  • Does the school have a safety plan?
  • How many hours of school counseling does the school offer each week?
  • How does the school mitigate bullying?
  • Do you know your students and families well?

“Students can’t learn if they don’t feel safe,” she says. “Parents should expect teachers and staff to know their students by name. “
Looking for a school? Discover our Directory K-12.

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Gilmore Bell announces new director and shareholder https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/gilmore-bell-announces-new-director-and-shareholder/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/gilmore-bell-announces-new-director-and-shareholder/ [ad_1] SALT LAKE CITY – (COMMERCIAL THREAD) – Gilmore & Bell, PC, a public finance law firm, is pleased to announce that Jacob B. Carlton has been appointed Director of the Salt Lake City office. Mr. Carlton assists his clients with municipal finance matters, focusing on tax-exempt private business bonds, including housing and 501 (c) […]]]>


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SALT LAKE CITY – (COMMERCIAL THREAD) – Gilmore & Bell, PC, a public finance law firm, is pleased to announce that Jacob B. Carlton has been appointed Director of the Salt Lake City office.

Mr. Carlton assists his clients with municipal finance matters, focusing on tax-exempt private business bonds, including housing and 501 (c) (3) bonds. He is also experienced in the area of ​​mortgage income bonds and regularly acts as legal advisor to public housing authorities in multi-family residential rental bond transactions. In addition, he has represented government and local bond issuers as an advisor in charter school financings and LIHTC financings. Mr. Carlton was called to the Utah Bar in 2008. He received his BM (summa cum laude) from Weber State University in 2002 and his JD from Gonzaga University School of Law in 2008, where he was a writer. deputy chief of Gonzaga Law Review.

Gilmore & Bell, PC is also pleased to announce that Claymore K. (Clay) Hardman has been appointed shareholder of the Salt Lake City office.

Mr. Hardman focuses on municipal finance matters, with an emphasis on securities offerings, securitizations, secondary market transactions, mergers and acquisitions, corporate restructurings, corporate loan financings. tax and related transactions. He represents a variety of government entities, housing authorities, investment banks, lenders, loan officers, private and charter schools, and various 501 (c) (3) organizations. Mr. Hardman was called to the Utah Bar in 2015. He received his Bachelor of Science degree from Brigham Young University, Marriott School of Management in 2011 and his JD (Honors) from the University of Utah. , SJ Quinney College of Law in 2015 where he served as Executive Process Editor for the Utah Law Review and president of the Business Law Society.

About Gilmore Bell

Gilmore bell is one of the leading public finance law firms in the United States. The company primarily represents government entities and 501c3 organizations to negotiate financing alternatives, including bond and lease transactions, economic development incentives, and public-private partnerships. For more than 25 years, Gilmore Bell has ranked in the national top 10 for the number of opinions of bond advisers rendered on municipal bond issues. Gilmore Bell has offices in Utah, Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, and Illinois. For more information, visit our website www.gilmorebell.com.

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Council to hold public hearing Monday on redevelopment plan for former Speeds Automotive | News https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/council-to-hold-public-hearing-monday-on-redevelopment-plan-for-former-speeds-automotive-news/ Sat, 18 Dec 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/council-to-hold-public-hearing-monday-on-redevelopment-plan-for-former-speeds-automotive-news/ [ad_1] CADILLAC – Cadillac City Council will be holding several public hearings on Monday. Three of the hearings will focus on a redevelopment plan for an obsolete property on Mitchell Street; two will relate to proposed changes to the city’s ordinances on medical and recreational marijuana; and another testament for an extension of tax linked […]]]>


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CADILLAC – Cadillac City Council will be holding several public hearings on Monday.

Three of the hearings will focus on a redevelopment plan for an obsolete property on Mitchell Street; two will relate to proposed changes to the city’s ordinances on medical and recreational marijuana; and another testament for an extension of tax linked to the remediation of contaminated groundwater in the industrial park.

Automobile Speeds Project

According to council documents, Lee Richards and Elizabeth Schnettner own and are redeveloping the former Speeds Automotive property and adjacent property into a mixed-use residential / commercial project.

The development is currently planned to have 14 apartments totaling 8,828 square feet and commercial / retail space totaling 5,000 square feet. The estimated private investment in development is $ 2,994,532.

Because the income from rental income is not sufficient to cover the costs of rebuilding the building, in addition to the level of operating costs, the project will only be able to continue if the economic development tools and incentives available to the city ​​are used.

To help with the redevelopment, council will consider approving a brownfield tax increase funding plan and a local tax abatement under the Obsolete Property Rehabilitation Act.

According to council documents, the brownfield plan was prepared to facilitate development by reimbursing the costs of lead and asbestos abatement, demolition and infrastructure through the capture of increased taxes generated by the private investment. The costs of eligible activities are estimated at $ 386,036.

The project also includes an OPRA tax allowance which will freeze the value of the building for local taxes for 12 years but provide for the collection of state taxes to reimburse eligible brownfield activities. The OPRA was used for the redevelopment of the Cobbs-Mitchell building and is comparable to the Commercial Redevelopment Act and Commercial Rehabilitation Act rebates that were established and previously used on other projects in the city, say the officials. board documents.

Marijuana Ordinance Amendments

Last month, the council voted to remove some restrictions on marijuana manufacturing facilities in areas of the city zoned for general industry and light industry.

Council subsequently voted to hold public hearings to discuss changes to ordinances establishing distance regulations for these facilities.

Cadillac city manager Marcus Peccia said the Cadillac Planning Commission unanimously approved recommendations that such facilities should not be built in close proximity to public or private schools.

Since arbitrary distance requirements – like not allowing establishments to operate within 1,000 or 500 feet of a school, for example – are not imposed on Cadillac’s other industries, Peccia said he doesn’t it would not be appropriate to impose such restrictions on marijuana.

Council will hear public comments on the planning commission’s recommendation not to build such facilities in close proximity to schools.

TIFA extension

For 30 years, the town of Cadillac has diverted tax revenues from Harry Janderjagt Industrial Park for cleanup efforts after various contaminants from industrial activities were discovered years earlier in the groundwater supply.

According to the plan approved by the council in 1991, “The city established the (Local Development Finance Authority) for the purpose of acquiring, constructing, installing and equipping a groundwater treatment plant in order to provide water to the district and simultaneously to decontaminate groundwater. found on adjacent plots of land and close to the district, thus making the rest of the property in the district susceptible to development.

The tax hike funding plan that was approved in 1991 expires this year and earlier this month Cadillac city council voted in favor of a public hearing to extend it for two years.

Cadillac City manager Marcus Peccia said previous estimates predicted it would be another two or three decades before cleanup efforts can be completed, although they currently do not have a specific timeline.

“It just takes time,” said Peccia, who added that “significant achievements” have been made in cleaning up groundwater over the past 30 years; he said a pending analysis of groundwater should paint a more accurate picture of how long work will need to be continued.

Cadillac City Council meets Monday at 6 p.m. at the Cadillac Municipal Complex, located at 200 North Lake Street.

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Fairstead Unveils Newly Renovated Apartments at Atlantis in Virginia Beach https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/fairstead-unveils-newly-renovated-apartments-at-atlantis-in-virginia-beach/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 23:28:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/fairstead-unveils-newly-renovated-apartments-at-atlantis-in-virginia-beach/ [ad_1] VIRGINIA BEACH, Virginia, November 18, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Fairstead, a vertically integrated, goal-oriented real estate company committed to sustainability and the creation and preservation of high-quality housing, today unveiled newly renovated homes at Atlantis Apartments in Virginia Beach. The first of 208 affordable apartment homes has undergone large-scale renovations, with families moving […]]]>


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VIRGINIA BEACH, Virginia, November 18, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Fairstead, a vertically integrated, goal-oriented real estate company committed to sustainability and the creation and preservation of high-quality housing, today unveiled newly renovated homes at Atlantis Apartments in Virginia Beach. The first of 208 affordable apartment homes has undergone large-scale renovations, with families moving into apartments with brand new kitchens, bathrooms, flooring and more this week. Fairstead hosted an open house for all residents of Atlantis to see the completed units and imagine their new homes.

This step marks the start of the first phase of a year of renovation of the apartments. Home to more than 600 residents, the renovation project will bring much-needed improvements – the first in 15 years – to the 51-year-old property.

“Fairstead is committed to the future of Atlantis,” said Estelle Chan, director, development at Fairstead. “We are proud to show our progress and give the residents of Atlantis a glimpse of the transformation to come at home. Across the country, Fairstead creates and maintains high quality housing that allows residents to stay and thrive in the communities they love.

Fairstead acquired the Virginia Beach property in July and invests $ 15 million in renovations for the 12-acre community, including new kitchens, appliances, bathrooms, flooring and fixtures, as well as new and improved windows, roofs and HVAC systems. In addition to existing amenities – a daycare, laundry room, basketball courts, and playgrounds – Fairstead is adding a community garden, fitness center, and computer room.

Following the acquisition of the property in July, Fairstead launched the neighborhood’s first public-private collaboration on Atlantis Community Day, created to provide essential community social services in partnership with more than 20 civic organizations and local religious to Atlantis residents, as well as Fairstead’s first annual event $ 25,000 donation to support the Virginia Beach Parks and Recreation Youth Opportunities Office. The new public-private collaboration includes representatives from the Seatack Civic League, Virginia Beach Public Libraries, Palms Church, the Department of Education, Housing and Neighborhood Preservation, Parks and Recreation, the Department of Health, local law enforcement and Fairstead.

Since acquiring the property, Fairstead has worked with local partners to deliver services and programs to Atlantis. Fairstead created a monthly partner-parent meeting to encourage closer links between school and home and provided transportation for children to school in case of driver shortages. The Virginia Beach Public schools brought their reading bus to Atlantis, a fun and engaging way for families to promote reading and literacy. Atlantis parents hosted a fall community Halloween festival, with support from Fairstead, after connecting through a monthly partner and parent meeting. Fairstead also coordinated a COVID vaccination clinic, providing access to the vaccine to Atlantis and our neighbors.

Fairstead’s design and construction team leads its renovation projects across the country. Since march 2020, Fairstead completed 1,199 renovations. Having an internal team provides cost effective and efficient solutions for the project. This group of experienced professionals, drawn from architecture, engineering, design and data science, bring a holistic and innovative approach to the renovation process. Fairstead has comprehensive repossession procedures, which have been streamlined in the transition of over 10,000 units to in-house management due to acquisitions and the transfer of assets to in-house management.

Fairstead recently announced a new $ 500 million commitment of equity capital to strategically develop the company’s operations, including expanding its multi-family housing portfolio and enhancing the company’s accessory technology, sustainability and community impact programs. The company made significant acquisitions this month, including 691 affordable housing units for seniors and families in Newark, New Jersey. The Alexandria Redevelopment and Housing Authority (ARHA) recently announced that it has chosen Fairstead, in partnership with Mill Creek Residential and The Communities Group, to redevelop the Samuel Madden Homes in Old Town Alexandria, where the company will establish. a sustainable mixed-use community. with affordable housing and for the workforce.

About Fairstead

Fairstead is a goal-oriented, vertically integrated real estate developer specializing in creating high quality, sustainable housing. Since 2014, Fairstead has acquired or developed more than $ 4 billion owned. With offices in new York, Maryland, and Caroline from the south, the Fairstead team manages more than 90 communities across the country and manages its comprehensive real estate platform, which includes acquisitions and development, venture capital investments in prop technology, design and construction, energy and sustainability, property management, marketing and leasing. The company also administers one of the most proactive community impact programs in the industry to provide on-site support services to residents. For more information, visit www.fairstead.com.

SOURCE Fairstead

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New York City shows signs of retail recovery despite empty offices – WWD https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/new-york-city-shows-signs-of-retail-recovery-despite-empty-offices-wwd/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/new-york-city-shows-signs-of-retail-recovery-despite-empty-offices-wwd/#respond Thu, 11 Nov 2021 23:24:47 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/new-york-city-shows-signs-of-retail-recovery-despite-empty-offices-wwd/ [ad_1] Despite a recent survey that quantified the continuing shortage of office workers in New York City, some executives in the Business Improvement District reported increased foot traffic, improved retail sales and optimism for the coming months. On Wednesday, the New York City Partnership released a survey of 188 large companies that found only 28% […]]]>


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Despite a recent survey that quantified the continuing shortage of office workers in New York City, some executives in the Business Improvement District reported increased foot traffic, improved retail sales and optimism for the coming months.

On Wednesday, the New York City Partnership released a survey of 188 large companies that found only 28% of Manhattan office workers returned to their desks. Additionally, office vacancy rates are at a 30-year high of 18.6%, and by January, only 13% of office workers are expected to be back in their Manhattan offices five days a week.

This week alone, unionized workers in Hearst were reluctant to return to the office once a week soon. As they and others struggle for more flexible hours, the city’s ecosystem is feeling its absence not only in sales of quick and casual lunches, but also in property tax revenues. Forty-nine percent of office workers are expected to return on average during the work week by January, according to the new survey.

Despite these discouraging figures, IDB leaders presented a more optimistic outlook on Thursday.

Dan Biederman, chairman of the 34th Street Partnership and executive director of Bryant Park, expects turnstile numbers to hit 80% just after the New Year. Small buildings are already at 80% and large buildings at 40%, he said, adding that TJX had just brought workers back to its office building at 5 Bryant Park, where the retailer occupies a few floors.

Part of their confidence comes from observational clues, such as the increased influx of people between 7 and 8 a.m. at 9 West 57th Street, home to “large legal and financial firms,” ​​according to Biederman, who lives off. across the street. People are better dressed than a year ago, and many are wearing suits again, he said. Neither Mayor Bill de Blasio nor Mayor-elect Eric Adams may have to do anything to encourage a return to office, he said. “It seems to be coming back. People got tired of the WFH.

Dan Pisark, vice president of retail services and special projects at 34th Street Partnership, said Penn Station is busier with travelers on Long Island Railroad and New Jersey Transit, as well as Amtrak to some extent. Subway stations near 34th Street are increasingly crowded. More and more people are walking around with shopping bags, especially at Macy’s and H&M, he said. Emphasizing that coronavirus cases have declined significantly, vaccination rates are significant, wearing masks is prevalent outdoors and foreign travelers vaccinated may return, Biederman and Pisark are “positive” about continued improvement.

Madison Avenue has seen a wave of store openings and expansion in existing stores of late.

Stretching from 57th Street to 86th Street, Madison Avenue BID has the advantage of sitting in a predominantly residential area instead of relying on office workers, said executive director Matt Bauer. Art House, a fine arts hub, will take over the former Barneys New York space on Madison Avenue. AG Jeans and Studs, Sleepy Jones and Christophe have opened new stores; Bogner unveiled an outpost and Brunello Cucinelli recently expanded. Giorgio Armani is in a temporary space as he is renovating another building. Hermès is building a new flagship at 702 Madison Avenue.

William Greenberg Desserts was expanding into what was once the Alexis Bittar store. The latter moved to another location on Madison Avenue. Bauer noted that a few pop-ups have become permanent stores such as Mackage’s LTDxNYC and Lizzie Tisch. Seaman Schepps will open a new store. With a current vacancy rate of 16%, that figure was around 19% a year ago.

Encouraged by the return of international travelers, Bauer expects there will be “some kind of shock” over the holidays, but that more people will visit the city next spring. Corinthia Hotels will also open their first US location in what was once Surrey in 2023.

Noting how the New York Social Diary increasingly covers events and galas, Bauer said the return of such events is a sign that things are returning to normal.

“Not only are there many events taking place in the community here, but they are also aimed at charities that are often based here,” he said. “Planning for these events often takes place in restaurants and hotels here. And people buy clothes to wear [to the galas on Madison Avenue stores]. “

The return to in-person learning in public and private schools has also brought families back to the neighborhood, he added.

With a few hundred stores, the Hudson Yards / Hell’s Kitchen Alliance lost just one retailer – Neiman Marcus – during the pandemic, group chairman Robert J. Benfatto said. “We did better than I expected. Most of the places remained. Any restaurant I’ve lost, a new one has opened or one is in the works.

Restaurants remain the strongest sector due to the number of tourists to the area and the return of some office workers, he said. “The traffic is worse than it has ever been,” Benfatto said, adding that many hybrid workers are more likely to drive for their two days of work in the office each week.

Two new office buildings are slated to open next summer with one that will have Facebook, or Meta, and Blackstone as key tenants, and the other will have Pfizer as its primary occupant. Meta and Pfizer signed before the pandemic. Together, the buildings have approximately 1 million square feet of space. One is almost fully leased and the other is about 60% leased, Benfatto said. This should bode well for retailers in the region and will translate into thousands of additional workers in the region, he added.

At NoHo, foot traffic improves during the day and increases as the week progresses, according to Cordelia Persen, executive director of NoHo BID. Unlike Midtown, where many office towers remain largely vacant, some NoHo workers have returned to their offices, which tend to be smaller with high ceilings and opening windows. The responsibility of bringing down five employees for thousands is very different, she noted. In turn, restaurants in the area have started serving lunch again, Persen said.

“We mostly have a lot of small businesses. When I get in the elevator of my 12 story building, we now stop at four floors. The elevator is full again. Maybe not 100% like before. she said.

Despite this, one of the major local tenants, Meta, has not brought its employees back from NoHo, and neither has Snap. “In addition, the technology [companies] feed their employees in the office so they don’t have a food footprint on our neighborhood, ”said Persen. She worried about the impact of the lack of workers on lunchtime restaurants, but noted that several restaurants in the area have recently reopened for lunch.

Sneaker retailers Laced Up and Sneaker City each opened their first stores in Manhattan. Apparently “very successful”, they “add a lot of life to Broadway”, according to Persen. Another direct-to-consumer brand, Lalo, which specializes in raised items for children and babies, has just opened a 4,700-square-foot Bond Street flagship store that also houses a cafe.

The exterior of the new Lalo Land.
Courtesy of Lalo Land.

“Mondays and Tuesdays are very slow. It is built until the weekend. It gets much stronger. The streets are much busier after 1 p.m. Stores tell us their numbers are on the rise again. It’s just a different buying model, ”said Persen, adding that Hatch and Ulla Johnson have had strong sales.

Anticipating a busy holiday shopping season, Showfields, a three-story location that provides digital-native brands with brick-and-mortar outposts, is setting up gift-wrapping tables to encourage shoppers to buy. lots of little gifts “for anyone you’ve ever cared about in the new post-Covid happiness,” Persen said. “They predict people will want to buy more Christmas presents. They [feel] that there is more wealth, more anticipation and that people spend more. Other people have told me the same thing.

The street scene in Noho

The street scene in Noho.
Courtesy of Noho BID

The NoHo BID has around 140 spaces on the ground floor, with fashion accounting for around 35%. The executive director said she noticed an increase in traffic in September, although concerns were mounting over the Delta variant. The children returned to the classrooms and the traffic on the streets became more dynamic as a result. Construction resumes and “For Rent” signs are showing down in the area. The return of New York University students has also helped staff at some local businesses.

“I hear high-end brands saying foot traffic is coming back,” she said.

Flatiron / 23rd Street Partnership executive director James Mettham said Gap will return to Lower Fifth Avenue with the opening of a store. Harry Potter New York has opened in the neighborhood. The current BID has more than 500 companies on the ground floor, but that will increase to 700 or 800 as the expanded limits go into effect next year. The area’s current vacancy rate varies from block to block, with some having 10% vacancies and others 15-20%, especially those closer to Union Square.

A Harry Potter store in Flatiron

Harry Potter New York can be found in the Flatiron / 23rd Street partnership.
Courtesy

Overall, foot traffic in the area has improved month over month. There is around 75% of foot traffic in 2019, which is “really promising,” Mettham said. Still impacted by the drop in the number of international travelers, the IDB leader was enthusiastic that there had been many purchases by national and regional tourists. And the recent easing of travel restrictions in the United States is “really great,” he said.

Looking ahead to the next few months, winter is generally a bit more difficult for retail compared to the holiday season, which makes businesses in the area feel really good, Mettham said. But rolling out boosters and vaccines for children could help bring back more office workers, he added. In response to the Delta variant, some area offices are considering a return in early 2022 and / or hybrid.

As Adams assumes his new role, Mettham said, “He understands the importance of what central business districts and the community at large mean to New York City’s economy and the quality of life for residents. people in every corner – whether in Midtown, Midtown South or any borough or main streets. We look forward to working with his administration. He announced his transition the other day. He has a great perspective on all kinds of facets that move the city.

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Microfinance company launches bancassurance in Tanzania https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/microfinance-company-launches-bancassurance-in-tanzania/ https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/microfinance-company-launches-bancassurance-in-tanzania/#respond Fri, 05 Nov 2021 08:21:53 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/microfinance-company-launches-bancassurance-in-tanzania/ [ad_1] Faidika is a subsidiary of Letshego Holdings Limited (LHL), a listed and Botswana-based holding company focused on financial inclusion in Africa. Faidika’s four main Bancassurance products were recently launched in Dar es Salaam in partnership with Sanlam, Sanlam Life, Alliance General, Britam General, Strategies General and Medical, First Assurance General, Jubilee Life and Jubilee […]]]>


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Faidika is a subsidiary of Letshego Holdings Limited (LHL), a listed and Botswana-based holding company focused on financial inclusion in Africa.

Faidika’s four main Bancassurance products were recently launched in Dar es Salaam in partnership with Sanlam, Sanlam Life, Alliance General, Britam General, Strategies General and Medical, First Assurance General, Jubilee Life and Jubilee General.

The company now offers Life Insurance, Health Insurance and Damage Insurance products, including property insurance coverage – all risks, industrial – all risks, fire and related risks, automobile, accident, home, burglary and theft, professional liability, goods in transit. and marine and freight insurance coverage, among others. In addition, Faidika will also offer clients its insurance premium financing, in order to allow their smooth integration and easy access to the acquisition of insurance products.

Faidika Chairman and CEO Baraka Munisi said: “The launch of this new line of insurance products is an exciting step that truly aligns with our vision to become a world-class leading financial services organization. This Bancassurance offering is part of our commitment to diversify our product offering, to deliver a unique customer value proposition and, at the same time, to elevate the Faidika offering to generate increased value through diversified revenue sources.

A key goal of Faidika is to reach the general public through its extensive network of branches and satellite operations across the country to provide access, convenience and financial inclusion to Tanzanians, including people living in the most remote regions of the country.

Faidika Board Chairman Adam Mayingu added: “We are extremely proud to be associated with the Tanzania Insurance Regulatory Authority (TIRA), the body that regulates all insurance services in the market. bancassurance in order to guarantee mutual benefit for all relevant stakeholders. At Faidika, we understand that our rapid responsiveness to customer needs generates trust, improves customer relationships, and enhances the customer experience, all leading to happy and satisfied customers.

Thanks to their new bancassurance solutions, Faidika is now able to provide its clients with added value and full services as a homogeneous and unique financial service provider, offering a wide range of relevant and innovative solutions for the benefit of existing clients. and potentials.

Faidika’s Head of Sales, Marketing and Distribution Channels, Asupya Nalingigwa, added, “Recognizing the peace of mind that our insurance solutions will provide to many Tanzanians, we are committed to increasing their convenience and access them, by offering them our attractive financing of insurance premiums, as part of our comprehensive Bancassuarance offer, offering our clients even more advantages.

Faidika is a licensed financial services provider that provides loans to individuals in the public and private sectors. The company is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Letshego Group and operates as a non-bank financial institution with 16 branches, 4 sub-branches and 86 satellite offices with a workforce of 58 employees. Their customer reach is enhanced through strategic partnerships, innovative delivery and their new enhanced digital channels.

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