school students – World Socialist CWI http://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 06:19:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4-150x150.png school students – World Socialist CWI http://worldsocialist-cwi.org/ 32 32 Cheshire Academy Going Mask-Optional later this month https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/cheshire-academy-going-mask-optional-later-this-month/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 06:11:22 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/cheshire-academy-going-mask-optional-later-this-month/ Cheshire Academy will make masks optional on its campus this month, after students and staff return from the school’s planned spring break. Principal of the schools, Julie Anderson, explained to the herald last week that administrators decided to wait until after the next recess, scheduled for March 11-29, to ensure “students and staff enjoy their […]]]>

Cheshire Academy will make masks optional on its campus this month, after students and staff return from the school’s planned spring break.

Principal of the schools, Julie Anderson, explained to the herald last week that administrators decided to wait until after the next recess, scheduled for March 11-29, to ensure “students and staff enjoy their break.” Given that Cheshire Academy is a private boarding school with students coming from all parts of the world, it was decided that changing mask mandates should err on the side of caution.

“We’re extremely cautious,” Anderson said. “We want people to really enjoy this break, so we thought it best to be a bit more careful and keep the masks on until then.”

The Academy considers itself a fully vaccinated school community, which provides administrators with another layer of comfort in terms of switching to a mask-optional model for the remainder of the spring semester, Anderson said. Also, when the Academy meets again after spring break, more activities are planned outside, weather permitting. Given that the virus has been shown not to transmit very effectively outdoors as opposed to an indoor environment, the school is confident that it can safely move away from many of the mitigation protocols that have been in place at different times during the pandemic.

“We make these decisions in consultation with our medical director, Chesprocott (health district), and state officials,” Anderson said. “We are moving to mask optional, and it will be very important to respect everyone’s comfort level and decision (regarding masks).”

“We will ask everyone to always bring a mask with them (to school), just in case there is a situation where it is needed,” she continued.

While the school won’t officially transition to a mask-optional model until the end of March, some Academy actors will have the opportunity to remove their masks this week when they perform their show, “The Lighting Thief : The Percy Jackson Musical”. (March 9, 10 and 11). In 2020, the annual production had to be canceled due to COVID-19, while last year cast members had to wear masks throughout the performance. But this year, the masks may come off…at least while the students are performing on stage.

“They’re so excited,” she said. “Our students have been so good, but they are happy to take the masks off. I know our athletes are also excited.

The Academy is following in the footsteps of most Connecticut schools in moving away from mask mandates, after Governor Ned Lamont’s statewide mandate expired on February 28, handing the decision over to local districts and to schools for the first time since the start of the pandemic. The Cheshire School District moved to a mask-optional model last week, and Superintendent of Schools Jeff Solan said officials do not plan to mandate masks unless required by a state authority. State.

Anderson commented that the Academy will always retain the ability to institute a mask mandate on its own if it deems necessary, even in the absence of a state mandate. This, she explained, is a product of the school’s student body containing so many overseas and overseas students, with limited space to quarantine them if they test positive.

“It just adds another layer to the decisions we have to make, so we want to be as flexible as possible,” she said.

Anderson joked that she would rather find a word other than “pivot” to describe the reactions of the school community over the past two years, but reiterated that administrators, teachers, students and parents had to be “agile” in order to deal with the uncertainty of the pandemic. For example, she admits that last June and July she had assumed masks would no longer be needed by the time students resume classes in September. Even as recently as last November, Anderson was thinking of ways to open up more.

“Then our medical director (Debra Bond), who is a rock star, said to me, ‘Oh, Julie, we have the omicron coming,’ and she was right,” Anderson said.

At no time during the school year has Cheshire Academy been forced to close due to an outbreak of COVID-19, and Anderson said that while a number of students and teachers have tested positive, the school has had no more than five students requiring isolation at any one time.

The Academy decided to extend its normal winter vacation, sending students home in early December, in response to the increase in the number of cases caused by omicron.

Now, members of the school community are preparing for a return to something more like normal.

“We are planning our big graduation ceremony for this year,” Anderson said, after the last two ceremonies had to be changed due to COVID. “We haven’t had a full on-campus reunion (for alumni) in three years, so we’re excited to schedule this.”

“It’s just exciting to get back to what we do best,” she continued. “I think there’s a percentage of people who are a bit anxious. They may feel like now we’re going to be exposed, but for the most part, I think everyone is feeling excited. It feels like the end is in sight. »

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I make a six figure income, so why did the government just give me $750 in food stamps? https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/i-make-a-six-figure-income-so-why-did-the-government-just-give-me-750-in-food-stamps/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 11:43:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/i-make-a-six-figure-income-so-why-did-the-government-just-give-me-750-in-food-stamps/ Two of my children recently received something in the mail called a Electronic Pandemic Benefit Transfer debit card, known as P-EBT, each charged $375. The cover letter explained that the money was for K-12 schoolchildren enrolled in the National School Meals Program – free and reduced lunch — during the 2020-2021 school year but who […]]]>

Two of my children recently received something in the mail called a Electronic Pandemic Benefit Transfer debit card, known as P-EBT, each charged $375.

The cover letter explained that the money was for K-12 schoolchildren enrolled in the National School Meals Program – free and reduced lunch — during the 2020-2021 school year but who missed these meals while schools were closed due to COVID-19.

But here’s the problem: my income exceeds the eligibility cap for such a thing, and yet my children weren’t actually enrolled in the program during the 2020-2021 school year…because they weren’t even enrolled at all in public schools!

They attended a private school and we prepared or paid for their lunches ourselves.

I smelled the smell of government waste, tracked it to its source, and this is what I found:

In early May 2020, P-EBT cards began being mailed to thousands of eligible students in Alabama, according to a news Release from the Alabama Department of Human Resources, which oversees the distribution of the cards with assistance from the Alabama Department of Education.

The state announced last April that a second round of benefits would be issued and notices posted in June, Augustand December said additional funds would be distributed statewide.

A spokesperson for the Alabama Department of Human Resources told me that 460,958 students received more than $144,279,786 in benefits for the 2019-20 school year. For the next school year, 2020-2021, he said 477,172 students received $326,682,316 in benefits, and when the summer months were added, the total for the year rose to 503,040 students. and $507,913,066 in funds.

That’s just over $652 million in benefits spread over 19 months.

So how did $750 end up in my mailbox?

Records provided by the Department of Human Resources show that Conduct of State and Local Services of Washington, DC, has secured a contract to handle the distribution of the cards. While records show various costs for the contract, past and potential, the department’s spokesperson told me it cost about $11 million to distribute the cards.

But the data — the actual names of those who are eligible and the amount of financial benefit they should receive — comes from the Alabama Department of Education.

Now remember spring and summer 2020. We had no idea how bad the pandemic was, how long it would last, and what we had to prepare for.

People were hoarding toilet paper. It was crazy there.

And in this context, school officials were trying not only to provide meals to those who had already signed up for the free and reduced lunch program, but also to the thousands more who had signed up since the start of the pandemic.

I spoke with the director of the Alabama Department of Education’s Child Nutrition Program and the spokesperson for the department. They both described a chaotic and confusing process of collecting and sorting through these existing and incoming accounts while navigating the process of moving to a new student data management system.

Records show that during the 2020-2021 school year, 347,663 Alabama public school students were enrolled in the free and reduced lunch program. But as the Department of Human Resources spokesperson said, 477,172 students received P-EBT benefits for that year, and a total of 503,040 if summer is included.

That’s quite a big difference, somewhere between 129,509 and 155,337 students.

And if each of them received the $375 that my children received (which depends on how long each student’s school is closed), that would be between $48 million and $58 million.

Officials said part of the difference can be explained by counting private schools that are on the free and reduced-price meal program, residential child care facilities and those that were added to the program during the effort to provide meals to families during the pandemic. , although all still had to meet the eligibility criteria. It’s just not clear what those numbers are, precisely.

It was a “pretty messy situation,” the Alabama Department of Education spokesman said, while the department’s child nutrition program director said some of the numbers needed “finagling.”

Being charitable was a sign of the times in 2020. People did the best they could with the challenges they faced and the resources and information they had.

Elaine Waxmanprincipal researcher at the Urban Institute, studied the national program and explained in a Washington Post story states faced a huge knowledge management problem.

“Centralized databases for this type of information were very rare, and education departments were not set up to collect and monitor these types of data,” Waxman said.

I cut up my P-EBT cards with a pair of scissors and returned them to the distributor with a note explaining that my children were not eligible. The Alabama Department of Education spokesperson said he hoped others in my place would do the same. While I share his hope, I’m not very confident about it, especially since the total at the grocery checkout has increased by 7.5% due to inflation over the past year. only.

One of the arguments Conservatives make against large government programs is that they are simply too big for anyone to manage properly, regardless of experience, resources or intent. You can add the P-EBT program to the long series of proofs for this argument.

Still, the federal government has extended the program, and state officials told me they are currently exploring the option, though no decision has been made.

First, the program must be paused, or even stopped completely. The list of eligible students of 2020-2021 cannot be considered the basis for distributing so much money.

Second, the solution to feeding students enrolled in the free and reduced lunch program is to KEEP SCHOOLS OPEN.

We can forgive the mistakes of the past, especially since it was a crisis. But education is supposed to be about learning.

And we can start by learning from our mistakes.

J. Pepper Bryans is a conservative opinion writer from Mobile who lives in Huntsville. Readers can find it at https://jpepper.substack.com.

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Lumen Christi Wins WAEC Award | The Guardian Nigeria News https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/lumen-christi-wins-waec-award-the-guardian-nigeria-news/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 02:20:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/lumen-christi-wins-waec-award-the-guardian-nigeria-news/ Lumen Christi International High School, Uromi, Edo State received another Augustus Bandele Oyediran Award for producing the best overall results in WASSCE for school applicants in 2021 in Nigeria. This is the sixth time the Catholic boys’ boarding school has won the award, having won it in 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014 and 2016. A letter […]]]>

Lumen Christi International High School, Uromi, Edo State received another Augustus Bandele Oyediran Award for producing the best overall results in WASSCE for school applicants in 2021 in Nigeria.

This is the sixth time the Catholic boys’ boarding school has won the award, having won it in 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014 and 2016.

A letter signed by Moyosola Adeyegbe, Acting Head of Public Affairs on behalf of the Head of the West African Examinations Council (WAEC) National Office, Patrick Areghan, which was made available to The Guardian, has declared that the award will be presented to the school during the official opening ceremony of the 70th annual meeting of Council on Tuesday, March 15, 2022.

The letter stated that the event will take place at the Convention Centre, Transcorp Hilton Hotel, Abuja at 12 noon.

The director of the institution, the Rev. Theophilus Itaman, in an interview, said the award will encourage the school and its students to shoot for more outstanding achievements.

He attributed the award to the style of education of the students in the school, saying that they are not only taught academically, but are also morally and spiritually cultivated as required by the church.

Ituman said a child who already has the fear of God is not difficult to nurture.

“So the moral training that children receive by being brought up not just in academics shapes them well enough to excel. We also send our teachers for training to build themselves,” said.

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Collegiate’s new Dutch mascot is a flashpoint in the race debate https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/collegiates-new-dutch-mascot-is-a-flashpoint-in-the-race-debate/ Sat, 19 Feb 2022 20:27:09 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/collegiates-new-dutch-mascot-is-a-flashpoint-in-the-race-debate/ The national judgment on race and privilege that has caused upheaval in schools across the country came at Collegiate, one of New York’s most prestigious private schools, when a group of students of color publicly demanded that the 400-year-old institution “address its own problems of racism and intolerance. In response, Collegiate officials created a 17-member […]]]>

The national judgment on race and privilege that has caused upheaval in schools across the country came at Collegiate, one of New York’s most prestigious private schools, when a group of students of color publicly demanded that the 400-year-old institution “address its own problems of racism and intolerance.

In response, Collegiate officials created a 17-member task force, which a year later produced a comprehensive 407-page report on the school’s “history and symbols,” filled with charts, findings survey and feedback from dozens of people connected to Collegiate.

Then in January, three years after students called for change, the final result of the study arrived in an email to parents and alumni: Collegiate’s mascot had a facelift.

In recent years, schools across the United States, from private schools like Collegiate to public high schools to Ivy League universities, have struggled to adapt to rapidly changing racial norms. and privileges by diversifying faculties, expanding curricula and adopting anti-racist guidelines.

Many of New York’s exclusive Collegiate private school counterparts, who are fiercely protective of their privacy, have faced their own controversies. At Brearley, Chapin and Spence, among others, disturbing testimonies from students of color have been compiled on dedicated social media pages. At Grace Church School and Dalton, anti-racist training led to minor uprisings and angry letters.

At Collegiate, it was the school’s mascot – a winking caricature of a crow’s-foot Dutch settler – who appeared as a flashpoint. The decision to change it has, predictably, caused some outcry, but on both sides.

Some people lamented that what they saw as an important part of Collegiate’s heritage was being erased. They viewed the Dutch mascot as a harmless embodiment of school pride and a loving connection to the tradition of the all-boys institution on Manhattan’s Upper West Side.

Others backed the initial call to change the mascot, seen by some as offensive, from its Eurocentric and racist connotations to its crude depiction of a disability, a peg leg. But they saw the result of the vast research project as a simple transformation that did not confront the broader issues of race and inclusion at Collegiate.

“It does next to nothing to address systemic racism and socio-cultural inequality at Collegiate,” said Luca Rojas, 32, who graduated from the school in 2008.

While redesigning the mascot is laudable, Mr. Rojas said, changing it only “scratched the surface of what really needs to be done to address systemic racism and socio-cultural inequities at Collegiate, which only makes the make it even more hollow and performative.

Others saw merit in the movement. A more recent graduate, Rifat Islam, 20, called the issue of mascots “a difficult balancing act for the school”.

Mr Islam, who graduated from Collegiate in 2019 and is now a junior at Yale, added: ‘It is more important to me that we have engaged in conversation.

The task force report, which is posted on the Collegiate website, also refers to plans to create a second task force devoted to the school’s policies on student admissions and retention, but offers no further details.

Officials at Collegiate, a K-12 school with about 650 students, did not respond to messages seeking comment for this article on changes to the curriculum, faculty or other aspects of the school.

Founded in 1628, Collegiate has a long list of prominent graduates that includes one of America’s Founding Fathers, New York’s first Governor John F. Kennedy Jr. and actor David Duchovny. With tuition and fees of around $60,000 per year, it is consistently ranked among the top private schools in the country. Most graduates go on to study at top-tier colleges.

A main objection to the mascot was that it was known to many as “Peg Leg Pete” and widely seen as representing Peter Stuyvesant, the 17th century Dutch wooden-legged leader of New Amsterdam whose legacy has has come under increasing criticism due to its property. of slaves, support for slavery and anti-Semitic policies.

The Stuyvesant name is still used by the prestigious public school Stuyvesant High School, where sports teams are known as the Peglegs, and by the sprawling residential complex of Stuyvesant Town on Manhattan’s East Side.

The Collegiate controversy began in February 2019, when the organization for students of color, Jamaa, said in a letter published in the school newspaper that “Collegiate must address its own issues of racism and intolerance.” .

The Jamaa letter, signed by 28 students, called for a more inclusive, less Eurocentric curriculum and for greater diversity among teachers and administrators beyond “cisgender heterosexual white men.”

In 1969, the letter noted, there had been two black students in the class. In 2019, there were also two black students in the class.

“Collegiate is a place where black children have their hair clogged and constantly touched without their permission as if they were animals in a petting zoo,” the letter reads.

Among the nine steps the students asked the school to take was #5: “a serious reassessment of our school’s mascot.” The letter called Stuyvesant a “vehement anti-Semite” who “ruled through hatred and racism.”

“Is this the man we want to represent Collegiate?” asked the letter. “Do his values ​​match ours?

The report calls the Dutch mascot “an ubiquitous reference in school life, synonymous with the school itself”.

The report said the task force – which included students, staff and college administrators – had “embraced an anti-racism mission and sought to engage students and teachers to challenge whiteness, racial privilege and prejudice. “.

A historian hired as part of the effort examined Collegiate’s place in history amid problematic items such as Stuyvesant’s personal legacy and the existence of slavery in early Dutch Manhattan.

The task force interviewed and polled more than 1,600 students, parents, faculty members and alumni about the school’s mascot and other symbols, which it noted “often become an indicator of feelings just below the surface, whether in school or in society, especially when it comes to race and power.

Some of those interviewed were asked to come up with a word or phrase relating to the Dutchman’s nickname and mascot. Responses ranged from positive (“iconic,” “historic,” “ubiquitous”) to negative (“racism,” “anti-Semitism,” “embarrassing”).

Finally, after three years of study and redesign work, a modernized image of Dutch was sent to thousands of parents and alumni last month.

Gone are the aspects that some people had called offensive, including the original character’s wooden leg and even his identity: the new character is shown in silhouette, with his face obscured.

As part of the same revision process, Collegiate dropped other traditions, including references to God in the secular school’s motto and on its official seal.

The report also recommended addressing other offensive parts of Collegiate’s history, including a fight song printed in a 1964 textbook that the task force said was worth “revisiting.” The song salutes Collegiate’s colonial ancestors, “those hardy old Dutchmen” who arrived in America and “announced to the wandering red men, ‘You must get out of the way.'”

Chinmay Deshpande, a 2020 graduate and task force member, said that despite the “undeniably reprehensible” connection to Stuyvesant, there had been considerable resistance to the mascot change. Among those who opposed the move, many former students emailed school officials asking why the issue was being considered.

“If that’s the answer,” said Mr. Deshpande, 19, “then I’m very pessimistic for systemic change at Collegiate.”

Alumni reaction to the mascot change has been mixed.

Some graduates told the task force that they supported the mascot change; others said it would be tantamount to giving in to political correctness. Some have suggested keeping the mascot but using it to educate students about Collegiate’s complicated history.

“I wonder why we spend so much time and effort and money on this?” said an elder in the task force report. “The future excellence of our students is not linked to a sporting symbol, but to how we interact with each other inside and outside the classroom.”

Another graduate, in an apparent investigation into Jamaa’s complaints in 2019, said, “Don’t let a child try to add a paragraph to their college essay destroy over 200 years of tradition.”

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Hands across the hemisphere: students helping students https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/hands-across-the-hemisphere-students-helping-students/ Sat, 19 Feb 2022 01:32:00 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/hands-across-the-hemisphere-students-helping-students/ Convinced that empowering girls in developing countries is one of the most effective ways to promote environmentally sustainable economic development, local high school students created a program to support the Escuela Vera Angelita (EVA), a new non-profit boarding school for girls in Nicaragua. . Gracey Dodd and Aanchal Chaudhary, students at High Bluff Academy (HBA), […]]]>

Convinced that empowering girls in developing countries is one of the most effective ways to promote environmentally sustainable economic development, local high school students created a program to support the Escuela Vera Angelita (EVA), a new non-profit boarding school for girls in Nicaragua. . Gracey Dodd and Aanchal Chaudhary, students at High Bluff Academy (HBA), a small college preparatory school in Rancho Santa Fe, founded the Hands Across the Hemisphere Club. The HBA club is raising money for the $5,000 annual tuition for Tatiana Leonor, an eighth-grader who aspires to be a teacher, to attend EVA.

“It is very important that girls get an education. We’d like to think we’ve progressed further than we actually have. Around the world, there are still places where girls have little or no rights, and it’s important to give them the resources to pursue their dreams,” said Chaudhary, a senior at High Bluff Academy.

The HBA club is raising money for the $5,000 annual tuition for Tatiana Leonor, an eighth-grader who aspires to be a teacher, to attend EVA.

(Rita Szczotka)

EVA, an initiative of the American non-profit organization Visions Global Empowerment in partnership with philanthropist Robert D. Friedman, is an environmentally sustainable boarding school for girls in grades 5-12 from underserved and vulnerable communities. The campus spans 437 acres in the community of La Grecia in San Ramón, Matagalpa, Nicaragua. When the project began in 2019, it employed 600 construction workers from surrounding towns, helping the local economy and families struggling for their livelihoods. EVA opened its doors to students in January 2022 with an inaugural class of 82 and 170 full-time faculty and staff.

“It has been a dream come true for me to witness the Escuela Vera Angelita progress from a mere vision to a reality. and resources, but it improves the local community and fulfills the 17 United Nations Sustainability Goals. I am grateful to Rob Friedman for his generosity and vision, and to Greg Buie for his leadership, and I am honored to chair the Board Board of Directors of this exceptional nonprofit humanitarian organization,” said Tamara Lafarga, Chair of the Board of Directors of Visions Global Empowerment, and resident of Rancho Santa Fe.

Girls’ education can be a powerful weapon in breaking the chain of poverty. According to UNICEF, “girls who receive an education are less likely to marry young and more likely to lead healthy and productive lives. They earn higher incomes, participate in the decisions that affect them most, and build a better future for themselves and their families.

Nicaragua is the poorest country in Central America and the second poorest in the Western Hemisphere with a population of 6.6 million, about twice the size of San Diego County. UN-Women estimates that in Nicaragua, 35% of women are married or in union before the age of 18 and nearly 10% before the age of 15.

Girls’ education also has a wider impact on societies. Evidence from multiple development sources demonstrates that educated women strengthen economies and reduce inequalities, contributing to more stable societies that give all citizens, including boys and men, the opportunity to fulfill their potential. Similarly, failing to promote girls’ education has consequences: a study conducted by the World Bank in 2018 indicates that “limited educational opportunities for girls and barriers to completing 12 years of schooling cost to countries between US$15 trillion and US$30 trillion in losses. lifetime productivity and income.

Girls’ education is also essential to protect the environment. Nestled between the Caribbean and the Pacific, Honduras and Costa Rica, Nicaragua is considered the “second lung of the Americas”. Home to 24 volcanoes, 70 unique ecosystems, and rainforests and cloud forests, the preservation of Nicaragua’s environment is essential not only for the nation but also for the Americas and, ultimately, for the world.

“The fact that EVA focuses on eco-education is great. It’s so important for our generation to learn how to protect the environment, something we talk about a lot here in California, but needs to happen everywhere. Supporting the girls at EVA will not only help them, it will also help us,” said Dodd, a junior at High Bluff Academy.

Not only are eco-education and environmentally sustainable development central to the EVA curriculum, but the girls will actually experience it. EVA’s unique campus has the capacity to harvest its own water, energy and food, and process much of its waste onsite. Ongoing efforts to restore the watershed and primary reforestation have already had an impact on the resurgence of plant and animal life. Great attention was paid during the campus design process to protecting the natural environment and minimizing its long-term ecological footprint. EVA is also on its way to becoming the first LEED-certified school project in Nicaragua.

HBA students hope to encourage other schools to support EVA’s unprecedented efforts by creating their own Hands Across the Hemisphere clubs. There are still girls who need sponsorship, and in the not-too-distant future, EVA hopes to offer internship opportunities and experiential service trips to American students on its campus.

If you are interested in starting your own Hands Across the Hemisphere club to support the girls of Escuela Vera Angelita, HBA student leaders would be happy to help. For more information, please email ellen@highbluffacademy.com.

To support the HBA Hands Across the Hemisphere club’s efforts to raise funds for Tatiana, donate through High Bluff Academy’s gofundme.com page. For donations of $50 or more, you will receive a t-shirt. — Ellen Sullivan is a teacher at High Bluff Academy

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Community Message: SHARP Literacy Reading Programs with Marquette and Carroll Universities https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/community-message-sharp-literacy-reading-programs-with-marquette-and-carroll-universities/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 01:42:24 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/community-message-sharp-literacy-reading-programs-with-marquette-and-carroll-universities/ Editor’s note: Community posts are where community announcements and event posts are posted. If you have a community-focused event that you think our readers would be interested in, please submit here. SHARP Literacy has announced details of the 2021/2022 student-athlete reading programs in partnership with the Marquette Golden Eagles men’s basketball and lacrosse teams, and […]]]>

Editor’s note: Community posts are where community announcements and event posts are posted. If you have a community-focused event that you think our readers would be interested in, please submit here.

SHARP Literacy has announced details of the 2021/2022 student-athlete reading programs in partnership with the Marquette Golden Eagles men’s basketball and lacrosse teams, and the women’s soccer team, and the men’s basketball team. Ball Carroll University Pioneers. This is the seventh and fifth consecutive year, respectively, of SHARP’s partnership with Marquette and Carroll University on the reading program. This year’s Reading with the Golden Eagles and Reading with Pioneers sessions began in October and will continue through May.

The partnership provides elementary students participating in the SHARP Literacy educational program at Milwaukee and Waukesha area schools the opportunity to meet and read with student athletes. As part of the program, athletes spend time reading with K4 – 5and level students (in person with Carroll University Pios and virtually with Marquette Golden Eagles) and discuss the importance of reading in all aspects of their education. Athletes also share their childhood reading experiences with students and answer their questions. This is a unique educational opportunity for young SHARP students, according to Lynda Kohler, president and CEO of SHARP Literacy. “These kids light up when athletes walk into their classroom or appear on their computer screens. As the athletes share their personal stories, the children see how reading has made a difference in their lives. It’s an inspiring experience for the students, but also for the athletes, as they have the opportunity to serve as mentors and give back to their community.

In the 2021/2022 academic year, the Reading Partnership Program with the two universities will include participation from approximately 30 student-athletes and five Milwaukee-area schools, including Blessed Sacrament, Browning Elementary School, Granville Lutheran School, Kluge Elementary School and St. Martini Lutheran. School and two schools in the Waukesha area, including Whittier Elementary School and La Casa de Esperanza.

Both university partnership programs are based on community service. “I am very proud of our partnership with SHARP Literacy and its mission to inspire children to become lifelong learners,” said Shaka Smart, head coach of the Marquette University Men’s Basketball Program. . “Marquette student-athletes enjoy being part of the ‘Read with the Golden Eagles’ program and making a positive impact on the Milwaukee community. Carroll University’s partnership with SHARP offers athletes the opportunity to inspire young students, according to Paul Combs, head coach of men’s basketball at Carroll University. “This program offers our student-athletes the unique opportunity to share their love of learning and reading with younger learners. Community service is an important part of what it means to be a pioneer, and our partnership with SHARP Literacy helps us put that tradition into action.

SHARP Literacy, Inc. is a Milwaukee 501(c)(3) nonprofit educational program whose mission is to partner with educators to foster a love of learning and advance the future of children through innovative experiences and programs based on STEAM. The primary goal of SHARP Literacy is to provide elementary school students with an imaginative learning experience that builds confidence, self-esteem, and a greater awareness of the world. This year, SHARP Literacy, Inc. will impart foundational literacy skills to thousands of urban elementary school students and educators at 49 schools in Milwaukee, Racine and Waukesha. For more information, visit www.sharpliteracy.org.

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Two years after COVID closures, students from international schools return to Victoria https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/two-years-after-covid-closures-students-from-international-schools-return-to-victoria/ Sun, 30 Jan 2022 03:30:07 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/two-years-after-covid-closures-students-from-international-schools-return-to-victoria/ The ‘State of Education’ still has more international high school students than the rest of Australia, although numbers have plummeted during COVID from nearly 9,000 at the end of 2019 to just over 4,800 in the end of last year. Victorian government schools accredited to teach international students – more than 100 secondary schools and […]]]>

The ‘State of Education’ still has more international high school students than the rest of Australia, although numbers have plummeted during COVID from nearly 9,000 at the end of 2019 to just over 4,800 in the end of last year.

Victorian government schools accredited to teach international students – more than 100 secondary schools and 50 primary schools – were forced to suspend new enrollments last year as the state battled coronavirus outbreaks.

There are now around 3,300 international students enrolled in public schools. Tuition fees for international students in public schools this year range from $12,628 for elementary students to $18,819 for grades 11 and 12.

Homestay fees range from $200 to $370 per week, according to government documents. Students can also study online in Term 1 and 2 before flying to Australia later this year.

Phil Honeywood, from the International Education Association of Australia, said newcomers were crucial and that schools and governments “really need to make sure we tick all the boxes to meet the challenges they will face.

“This will include finding enough foster families, overcoming certain vaccination protocols [for under-18s]and making sure they don’t start the school year late due to lack of commercial flights.

But Tracey O’Halloran, who runs Australia’s Education Assessment Services – which helps schools market overseas and tests international students – is optimistic of a quick rebound.

“The school sector will take time to recover, maybe four to five years,” she said.

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“Parents of school-aged children will take the time to feel confident again to send the child abroad while there is still uncertainty. But we hope it will be much sooner .

Throughout COVID, dozens of the state’s most expensive private schools have advocated for the urgent return of international students.

Among them is Oakleigh Grammar, which has 20 international students this year, up from 50 before the pandemic.

Principal Mark Robertson said 10 students had remained in Australia throughout the pandemic, five had left other schools which had closed their international student programs and the other five had arrived by air over the summer , mainly from Cambodia.

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COVID has also expanded Victoria’s boarding schools, which have become increasingly reliant on international students over regional and rural Australians.

Many have kept their doors open over the past two years to deal with students who have been unable to return to their home countries.

Katherine Tong, boarding captain at Burwood PLC Girls’ School, has not seen her family in China for 842 days (as of Thursday). She said the boarding house had become a home away from home.

“Although I can’t see my real family, my friends and all the staff are really nice, so I feel like I’ve found a second home in Australia,” the 17-year-old said.

Katherine plans to visit her family when she graduates and then go to university in Australia.

A spokeswoman for Victoria’s Department of Education said: ‘Throughout the pandemic we have continued to support current and prospective international students, we are providing additional wellbeing and learning support to students on land and abroad, as well as financial support for international students. face difficulties. »

Opposition education spokesman David Hodgett said it was fantastic to bring international students back to Victoria.

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“Admissions”, by Kendra James – The New York Times https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/admissions-by-kendra-james-the-new-york-times/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 13:39:02 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/admissions-by-kendra-james-the-new-york-times/ ADMISSIONSA surviving boarding school memoirBy Kendra James At the start of her memoir, “Admissions,” Kendra James describes an off-campus adventure near her new boarding school. The students accompanying him are, like James, Black – among the few black students at Taft, an elite school that, like so many others, was built for wealthy white boys. […]]]>

ADMISSIONS
A surviving boarding school memoir
By Kendra James

At the start of her memoir, “Admissions,” Kendra James describes an off-campus adventure near her new boarding school. The students accompanying him are, like James, Black – among the few black students at Taft, an elite school that, like so many others, was built for wealthy white boys. Wandering the Connecticut countryside, James and his friends take a goose egg from a nest. They plan his care, using dormitory lamps to warm the unhatched gosling, which James names Crookshanks. The egg is moved from a solitary office to a solitary office.

When school staff members finally discover the egg, intact and fetid, in James’ room, James is not present. A white peer accused her of stealing $20, and James made an excruciating calculation: because she lacks the resources to speak out against the interpersonal and institutional racism driving the conflict, falsely claiming responsibility is the easiest way to further education. James confesses and is suspended. Staff find the egg which, James writes, “had partially split open in their hands, sending a smell of rotten eggs and partially grown goose down the hallway”.

She adds, “I was okay with that.”

No tears for Crookshanks. But the reader holds the loss, which is not about a bird, of course, but about teenagers trying to settle in a place that has admitted them without extending a sense of belonging to them. It’s part of a series of heartaches from James in his fresh and fun memoir. For James, and for students like her, Taft is no nest.

But maybe it was. James was the first Black American legacy at Taft – “legacy” here meaning the child (or grandchild or great-grandchild) of a graduate. (A previous black alumnus whose daughter was Bermuda; the distinction would have been lost on members of Taft’s white community, but it’s essential for James.) James’s father, from the south side of Chicago, entered at Taft through a scholarship program, and by the time James enrolls, he is a trustee.

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Now that the autopsy report is out, by Olu Adebayo – https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/now-that-the-autopsy-report-is-out-by-olu-adebayo/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 18:04:10 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/now-that-the-autopsy-report-is-out-by-olu-adebayo/ [ad_1] This will be my second speech since the unfortunate death of Sylvester Oromoni Jnr .; the 12-year-old student from Dowen College, Lekki, Lagos. I intervene because I am a parent and actor in the field of education. It is gratifying that the police have taken bold steps to address the problem despite reluctance. At […]]]>


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This will be my second speech since the unfortunate death of Sylvester Oromoni Jnr .; the 12-year-old student from Dowen College, Lekki, Lagos.

I intervene because I am a parent and actor in the field of education.

It is gratifying that the police have taken bold steps to address the problem despite reluctance. At least some effort has been made.

But now, Sylvester’s parents are not convinced that justice will be served. His father, according to reports, has vowed to continue seeking justice in the case.

Oromoni’s lawyer Femi Falana also rejected the autopsy report, calling it too hasty.

Falana reportedly said authorities were aware that the Lagos State Chief Coroner had ordered an inquest into the circumstances surrounding the boy’s death.

Although aggrieved parties have the right to maintain their position, it is important to clarify that in seeking justice, we do not let emotion take over.

Sometimes it is better to leave the culprits unpunished than to punish the innocent. Insisting that the young boy was murdered without clear medical evidence will not help the cause of justice.

We must ensure that those who do not know anything about Sylvestre’s death are not unduly charged. There are already too many cases of innocent people in detention suffering for what they know nothing about.

Warri and Lagos’ medical reports, police said, confirmed the young man had not been murdered.

If, on the other hand, the young man was murdered and the authorities are manipulated into tampering with the autopsy report, we can only hand them over to God’s tribunal. Nobody can do much. But parents can also continue to seek legal redress.

Cases similar to that of Oromoni Jnr have been ignored. But the good thing about this particular case is that some action would be taken. This is where the Lagos State Police and Government are to be commended.

Lagos State Police Commissioner Hakeem Odumosu provided an overview of actions taken by authorities so far.

He said five students and three homemakers from Dowen College were released following the autopsy results.

It is instructive to note that three of the five detained students were apparently not there when the young boy was allegedly bullied and poisoned.

Odumosu said all parties to the case, including the deceased’s family, the school administration and witnesses, have been questioned by him.

According to him, “During the public interview, it was unanimously agreed that another autopsy should be performed in the presence of pathologists from all parties. The investigation was extended to Delta State and Abuja.

He said the same case was reported to Regional Command in Warri, Delta State, on December 1, 2021.

According to Odumosu’s statement, an autopsy was first performed by a consultant pathologist, Dr Clement Vhriterhire of Warri Central Hospital.

The result attributed the cause of death to “acute lung injury from chemical poisoning in the context of blunt trauma.”

It was after that that a toxicological screening was recommended. Pending the toxicology result, another autopsy was ordered by the Coroner Magistrate of Lagos due to the status of jurisdiction.

The second autopsy, according to Odumosu, was performed at Lagos State University Hospital on December 14, 2021, attended by representatives of all parties involved in the case.

The result, he said, attributed the cause of death to sepsis, lobar pneumonia with acute pyelonephritis and pyomyositis of the right ankle.

Dr Clement Vhriterhire, the same doctor who performed the first autopsy, attributed the cause of death to “acute bacterial pneumonia due to severe sepsis”.

He said that a case of torture, intimidation and forced application of poisonous substances against the suspects could not be established.

He also rejected the claim that the deceased was coerced into joining a sectarian group.

Autopsies of Lagos and Warri confirm that the deceased died of natural causes according to Odumosu.

Dr SS Soyemi, a consultant pathologist who led a team of pathologists to perform the autopsy, said: “Oromoni’s death was caused by sepsis following infections of the lungs and kidneys resulting from an autopsy. ankle injury. No evidence of blunt trauma in this body. Results in the esophagus and stomach are not consistent with chemical poisoning. Death, in this case, is natural.

Odumosu said the legal opinion from the Directorate of Public Prosecutions indicated that there were no prima facie cases of murder, manslaughter and / or malicious administration of poison with intent to harm, against students and housekeepers, so they could not be prosecuted. .

The school for its part did everything humanly possible to get to the bottom of things. He took the lead in investigating the young man’s death.

It’s comforting enough that he didn’t show any form of arrogance. Rather, he cooperated with the authorities to get to the bottom of the problem.

The school is expected to have learned some useful lessons from the events of the past two months.

In the future, the school must strengthen its security and put measures in place to prevent future incidents. The number of its security cameras should be increased in every nook and cranny of the school.

The school should also make an effort to perform a medical and moral background check of the type of students it admits.

It’s a new start for Dowen College. This is another phase. This is a phase where all hands must be on the deck. Staff and students must be emboldened and courageous to meet the challenges ahead.

They must learn to appreciate each other. Students, for their part, must avoid any form of temptation to endorse public stereotypes. They have a pedigree. This pedigree has been maintained over the years. They should not allow strange forces to bring them down.

They must understand that they are now like a city on a hill. Any moral infringement on their part will take the head of the media and reference will be made to the events of the last few months. Now is the time to be on their toes and watch out for things that could damage their good reputation.

Sylvester’s parents on the other hand and indeed parents generally have a lot to learn. Given the boy’s critical condition, the parents might have been expected to take him to a nearby hospital in Lagos instead of trekking hundreds of kilometers to Warri.

Sylvester passed away on November 30, 2021. He was withdrawn from school on November 24, 2021. There was a six day period between the time he was withdrawn from school and the time he passed away.

What informed Warri’s trip upon seeing the boy’s critical condition? Did the boy have a health problem that could only be cured by Warri? Did he have a special Warri-based doctor due to his medical history?

The answers to these questions can be like crying over broken milk. But then parents should listen to their wards when they file complaints. Our children should be free to express their views on matters that affect their well-being. It is true that we know what is best for them, but sometimes what is best for them does not really suit them.

We need to be able to determine if our children have the capacity to stay in the hostel. Not all children can bear to be left alone without parental supervision. Some kids are just not cut out for boarding school. While there is nothing wrong with living in a home, we should try to understand the psychology of our children and treat them accordingly.

For some members of the public who are stoking the embers of hatred for Dowen College, it’s time to rest. If the school collapses today, it will not add value to the life of another institution. Many people benefit from the impact of the school. Although it is a fee-based school, many students from needy homes are offered scholarships by the school. We can only encourage the school to do better and to control the management when it is wrong.

Adebayo wrote from No 77 Adeobola Street, Surulere, Lagos

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Connecticut Universities and Colleges Requiring COVID Booster Injections for Next Semester https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/connecticut-universities-and-colleges-requiring-covid-booster-injections-for-next-semester/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 15:14:02 +0000 https://worldsocialist-cwi.org/connecticut-universities-and-colleges-requiring-covid-booster-injections-for-next-semester/ (WTNH) – With positive rates of COVID-19 rising and fear of the new omicron variant, several Connecticut colleges and universities have required booster shots for those returning to campus for the next semester. Yale University COVID-19 Coordinator Stephanie Spangler sent a letter regarding COVID-19 booster injections, saying in part, “Given these findings against the backdrop […]]]>

(WTNH) – With positive rates of COVID-19 rising and fear of the new omicron variant, several Connecticut colleges and universities have required booster shots for those returning to campus for the next semester.

Yale University COVID-19 Coordinator Stephanie Spangler sent a letter regarding COVID-19 booster injections, saying in part, “Given these findings against the backdrop of the current wave of infections, University leaders have decided that all eligible students be required to receive reminders before returning to campus for the spring semester. Additionally, all faculty and staff should receive reminders as soon as they become eligible. “

Wesleyan University will require reminders for all students, staff and faculty and beyond the university’s vaccine tenure policy.

“Thanks to our high vaccination rates, mask warrants and robust testing protocols, the Wesleyan campus community has consistently maintained lower COVID-19 positivity rates than our surrounding region,” wrote the president of Wesleyan University, Michael Roth. “The vast majority of faculty, students and staff are currently eligible to receive their booster and must upload a copy of their updated immunization card to WesPortal, showing the date they received their booster, by Friday the 14th. January. “

Another college requiring booster injections is the University of the Sacred Heart. In a letter sent, officials from Sacré-Coeur school said all students, faculty and staff who plan to be on campus must receive the full COVID-19 vaccination, including a booster .

Those exempt from this requirement are students enrolled in fully online programs, faculty students, and staff who may have requested a religious or medical exemption prior to the 2021-2022 academic year.

In addition to the recall warrants, Yale school officials sent a letter to students and staff at Yale, saying they wanted students to be able to return home now, rather than risk spreading COVID-19 in the finals in person.

From December 19, all exams will either be remote or instructors will offer remedial exams or alternative methods to complete the semester.

To help students adjust to the sudden change, Yale officials are offering students the following options.

If your instructor offers a remote exam at the scheduled time, you can take that exam at that time or choose to defer it as described below.

If you need to postpone academic work due to your travel disruption, synchronous exam, home exam, final assignment, etc., you can request and receive this permission from your college dean. residential; TIor ABX’s temporary grade will appear on your transcript.

If your instructor offers the option to cancel the final exam and base your final grade on the work you have already submitted this semester, you will have the additional but non-reversible choice of accepting that grade, converting it to the grade. of “CR” (which will not count towards the regular credit / D / failure score limit), or request an ABX from your resident college dean and catch up as described above.

If your instructor chooses to replace the final exam with another assignment, please follow these instructions.

Marvin Chun (Dean of Yale College), Tamar Gendler (Dean, Faculty of Arts and Sciences), Lynn Cooley (Dean of Graduate Schools of Arts and Sciences)

Yale classes are still scheduled to resume on Jan. 18, but officials said students should allow for the possibility of some or all of the activities taking place remotely at the start of the semester.

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